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Soul Asylum Announces Tour Dates With The English Beat

Soul Asylum Announces Tour Dates With The English Beat

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Minneapolis rockers Soul Asylum announces new U.S. tour dates with The English Beat in support of its newest album, Change of Fortune, which was released on March 18, 2016.

In addition, the second single from the album, “Doomsday,” will impact at radio on May 23rd.  The song was featured as the Song of the Day on Minneapolis’ tastemaker station KCMP The Current.  Listen to “Doomsday” here.

Change of Fortune is three years in the making, recorded while the band toured non-stop, had a few line-up changes and some soul searching, but upon listening to Change of Fortune, it’s clear the band’s trademark ragged-but-right sound is still very much intact.

About Change of FortuneBlurt Magazine writes that the album “kicks serious f*cking ass,” while Relix adds, “the new album shows a band still at the peak of their prowess, with clear potential for garnering whatever fortunes the future may hold.”  And Innocent Words offers, “’Change of Fortune’ is a straightforward rock & roll album led by Pirner’s poetic gift for storytelling and finds the frontman soul-searching along the way…while maintaining that signature Soul Asylum sound which so many fans love.”

The heart and soul of Soul Asylum remains and they continue to produce heartfelt and passionate rock n’ roll.  The band consists of David Pirner on guitar and vocals, Michael Bland on drums, Winston Roye on bass and Justin Sharbono on guitar.

Tour dates (more dates to be added shortly):

Sat, May 21, 2016 – Dallas, TX – Wildflower Festival
Sat, Jun 4, 2016 – Memphis, TN – Marquette Park
Thu, Jun 16, 2016 – Burlington, ON, CAN – Sound Of Music Festival
June 18, 2016 – Apple Valley, MN – Weesner Family Amphitheater*
June 19, 2016 – Kansas City, MO – Boulevardia*
June 22, 2016 – Warrendale, PA – Jergel’s Rhythm Grille*
Jun 23, 2016 – Baltimore, MD – Sound Stage*
Jun 25, 2016 – Boston, MA – The Royale*
Jul 1, 2016 –  Fairfield, CT – Ridgefield Playhouse*
Jul 2, 2016 – Philadelphia, PA – Trocadero*
Jul 5, 2016 – Kent, OH – The Kent Stage*
Jul 9, 2016 – Chicago, IL  – Thalia Hall*
Jul 10, 2016 – Rochester, MN – Down By the Riverside
Jul 12, 2016 – Vail, CO – Gerald Ford Amphitheater
Jul 21, 2016 – Los Angeles, CA – Whisky A Go-Go
Jul 28, 2016 –  Royalton, MN – Halfway Jam
Jul 30, 2016 – Sterling Heights, MI – Dodge Park Bandshell

*Dates with The English Beat

https://www.facebook.com/SoulAsylum
www.soulasylum.com

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CHANGE OF FORTUNE: Dave Pirner On Life, Music & Soul Asylum’s New Album

CHANGE OF FORTUNE: Dave Pirner On Life, Music & Soul Asylum’s New Album

soul-asylum-2016-1

With 35 years in the music game and 11 albums under his belt, Dave Pirner of Soul Asylum has seen it all. Through the years he experienced his fair share of ups and downs, along with occasional tragedies and triumphs. This struggle stokes the creative fire burning within him and carries him forward as a songwriter who continuously strives to explore new sonic territory.

The story of Soul Asylum began in Minneapolis, Minnesota, back in the early 1980s, when the original lineup took shape. However, the band was anything but an overnight success. After several indie releases on Minneapolis’ Twin/Tone Records and A&M, Dave Pirner and Soul Asylum exploded onto the national scene when the band released its groundbreaking album “Grave Dancers Union.” Soul Asylum followed up this success with “Let Your Dim Light Shine” in 1995, which climbed to #6 on the Billboard 200 and featured the #1 Modern Rock track “Misery.” After releasing “Candy From a Stranger” in 1998, the band members wanted to concentrate on writing and took a break from recording. The band reconvened in 2004 to begin work on their ninth full-length album, joined by a new drummer, Michael Bland. Sadly, shortly thereafter, bassist Karl Mueller was diagnosed with throat cancer and passed away after finishing his work on the new album. “The Silver Lining” was released in 2006 and was dedicated to Karl’s life and memory. The band took a long and unscheduled hiatus as they grieved and dealt with the loss of their friend and bandmate. In 2012, Soul Asylum released the aptly titled “Delayed Reaction.”

In 2016, Soul Asylum returns with their 11th studio album, “Change of Fortune,” released on March 18th via eOne Music. An effort three years in the making, it was recorded while the band toured non-stop, had a few lineup changes and some soul searching, but upon listening to “Change of Fortune,” it’s worth the wait. Soul Asylum loyalists will discover the group’s trademark ragged-but-right sound intact. The heart and soul of Soul Asylum remains and they continue to produce heartfelt and passionate rock n’ roll. The band consists of David Pirner on guitar and vocals, Michael Bland on drums, Winston Roye on bass and Justin Sharbono on guitar.

Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with the driving force behind Soul Asylum, frontman Dave Pirner, to discuss his life in music, the challenges of bringing “Change of Fortune” to life, the music and artists who inspire him and what the future holds for the band.

Your music has been a part of our lives for many years. What are some of your earliest memories of music?

Hmmmm. Hold on, Jason. I am going deep! [laughs] Some of my first memories of music are listening to my mother sing in church and going to Methodist church camp. I guess I was singing campfire songs and shit like that. I also remember hearing the song “When You’re Hot You’re Hot!” I remember hearing that on the radio and saying, “You’ve gotta get that 45.” Sometimes, when I would hear things on the radio, I wouldn’t know the title of the song. I would end up going, “It goes like this mom! When you’re hot ‘cha hot and when you’re not you’re hot-tah!” [laughs] My mom was like, “What the fuck do you want me to do?” We used to go to Zare’s Shopper City, which is kind of like a Target nowadays, and sing the tune to the person working in the record section to see if they could figure out which song I was talking about! I also remember going to the lake with my folks and they had about four different cassettes. I listened to those cassettes quite a bit. Before that, I would make drum sets out of my mom’s pots, pans and round Quakers Oats containers. I made drum sets out of whatever I could find in the house and would bang on them. I would also sing Elvis Presley. I think it was “Hound Dog.” I was doing an Elvis Presley impersonation a long fuckin’ time ago! [laughs] I was into impersonating Elvis before I even knew it was a thing! [laughs]

At what point did you realize music was something you wanted to pursue seriously and, ultimately, do as a career?

Well, that is kind of a tough one. [laughs] One day, I called my boss from Milwaukee and I said, “I don’t think I am going to be coming in tomorrow because I am in Milwaukee.” He said, “Well, don’t bother coming back.” That was my last job so, at that point, there I was. I was with the band in a pickup truck and I was like, “Well, I guess this is it for me.” I never went and found another job, so it all sort of happened by default. I think it was all part of my dream but I never knew it was possible. In a way, I just sort of kept at it. When I was playing trumpet and stuff in school, I never really thought, “Oh, I am going to be a professional trumpet player!” [laughs]

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You achieved great success in your career but keeping the momentum going is not an easy process. To what do you attribute your longevity?

For me, it got to that point where I said, “OK, this is me and this is what I do.” The nature of it is to be relentless, passionate, patient, persistent and a little bit crazy! You just start thinking, “Fuck, I am going to do this come hell or high water and no one is going to give me permission to do it. Maybe no one will encourage me to do it but it is what I love to do and I’m gonna do it!” Things happen and bands change like they do, from people quitting, dying or whatever the case may be. When things like that happen I start thinking, “Oh fuck! It’s over!” Then somebody else in the band will go, “No it’s not. We’ll figure this out.” It is sort of a combination of dedication and raw devotion, as far as I am concerned. I love doing it and you can’t take that away from me, I guess! [laughs]

Soul Asylum just released their 11th studio album, “Change of Fortune.” When did you start planting the seeds for what would become this album?

My deal is that I start on the next record when the last one is finished, so I had an engineer over here yesterday and we are getting ready to demo some songs and stuff. It is really just an ongoing cycle. I just start doing it! I am always writing and always trying to come up with ideas or having things popping into my head. It is a process! We had a lot of the DIY aesthetic with this record and I am really proud of it. I am also really more convinced than ever that no one can grant me permission or tell me I can’t do it!

Did you have goals or aspirations in mind when you started?

Yeah, in the way that I have always been trying to get to Soul Asylum music. How it ends up becoming that is kind of a high standard, whether it is my own personalized standard or someone in the band. Someone might say, “That song doesn’t move me but that one does.” I am like, “Alright! Let’s work on that one then!” I just keep pitching songs to the band until we have enough songs for a record. Now that the band is versatile and incredibly adaptive at playing so many different styles, vibes, moods and grooves, it gives me the opportunity to put some music out that I have always wanted to put out. I think that is a big part of the motivation and satisfaction that goes with it. I get to crystallize some of these ideas that I have been struggling with for as along as I can remember. I have been trying to get them out of my head and onto the record for ages.

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What can you tell us about your songwriting process? What changed and what stayed the same through the years?

The major change is that I have started fuckin’ around with computers. As the digital thing is this weird angle, where if I have an idea, I can get it into Pro Tools immediately and start working on it. I sort of have the seed for the idea and I have to hum it into a tape recorder and play the guitar part into a tape recorder. It is probably always most constructive to sit down with an acoustic guitar, a piece of paper and a pencil and work it out. I am looking at all my tools right here. Sometimes I sit at the piano, sometimes I pick up the acoustic guitar and sometimes I pull a chair up to the Pro Tools studio. It has evolved in every which way. Back in the day, I used to bring a part into practice and we would play it over and over and over again. The next day, I would bring in another part and we would play that over and over and over again. Then we would play them both, one after the other. The next day I would bring in one more part and so on. At some point, you are like, “Wait a minute, this has too many parts!” [laughs] Or you might say, “I like that part but not the other part.” We would flesh it all out in the practice space. Around the time of “Grave Dancers Union,” I started playing acoustic guitar and that is what kind of made that situation different. Before that it was all punk rock and there were definitely no acoustic guitars involved! [laughs] It was kind of a delayed reaction, no pun intended, to pick up an acoustic guitar at that point was something I should have done much earlier.

I am sure each project brings a unique set of circumstances. Did you face challenges in bringing “Change of Fortune” to life?

Oh God! [laughs] Yeah, every record has its own trials, tribulations, drama and bullshit. There is always the questions of, “Where are we going to get the money? How’re we gonna … ? When are we gonna … ? Who’s available?” All those sorts of things go into this process. When we used to get bankrolled $800,000 to go to LA or New York to be in a studio for two-and-a-half months, there were fewer questions. Those days are long gone and now it is a lot more streamlined. When me, Michael [Bland] and John Fields started making some of the rough skeletons for the tunes, we were missing Tommy [Stinson], who had just gone back to Axl Rose. We didn’t really want to make a solo record or a Soul Asylum record. We found Winston and his playing on this record just tickles the cockles of my balls! Over the course of making the record, the band rallied around it. It wasn’t really a complete band when we started working on it, so that was a big challenge.

You worked with John Fields in the past. What does he bring out of the band creatively?

I think that Michael and John had a really, really great rapport before I started working with the two of them. They had worked on all kinds of projects together. Oddly, it was John who I ran into on the street and he said, “I’ve got to get you in the studio with Michael Bland.” I said, “That sounds great to me but I’m not sure how I am going to make that happen.” Before we knew it, Michael got freed up and auditioned for the band. It was the shortest audition in history! I instantly said, “Holy shit! There he is! I have been waiting my whole life for this guy!” To that effect, John can engineer and play bass at the same time, which is pretty awesome. He has producer chops, whatever that means. He understands all the engineering and all the ins and outs of a professional studio situation. To that degree, when the three of us are working, John is engineering, Michael is at the drum kit and I am playing guitar and singing, it is extremely efficient. He is just a super talented guy.

What does the title of the album, “Change of Fortune,” mean to you?

Well, I don’t know but it has a lot to do with New Orleans. I think that the music, song to song, is affected by the atmosphere of New Orleans. Maybe when you are in a Second Line parade and celebrating somebody’s death, perhaps it is a positive way of looking at something. Maybe it forces you to believe things are going to have to get better. Basically, that is it. It was Winston’s idea to name the record after the song. He did it in a way that was like, “Goddamnit, I am tired of talking about this! Let’s just call the record ‘Change of Fortune!’”’ I went, “OK! Done!”

What impact has New Orleans had on you as a singer, songwriter and performer?

Fuck, man! Probably so much that I don’t even have a full grasp of the full breadth of what is what I went down there for and how I absorbed it. The idea for me is not to co-op something or be influenced necessarily, inspired perhaps, but it was the spirit of the music that lives there that is unique to this one place in the world. I was so swept up and sucked into it. I would hear a few things and think, “What the fuck is this?! Oh, my god! I have to go where this music is coming from!” We would stop there on tour and take a day off in New Orleans. I was like, “Holy shit! What is going on here?! There is so much music just oozing out of everything.” I was also a trumpet player as a kid. I guess I didn’t really know how the trumpet was supposed to sound, even after seven years of taking trumpet lessons in Minneapolis. [laughs] When I got to New Orleans, there was a guy on every corner just playing the shit out of that thing! [laughs] The rhythm, dancing and culture was just so beautiful to me and so different than what I grew up with. I had spent time trying to live in New York and Los Angeles. I really wanted the culture. There is just such a crazy melting pot of culture and music in New Orleans that is not rock and roll. It is kind of all the things that informed rock and roll and enabled it to exist. It is a living history that sort of came out of Congo Square and some of these places where these different people coming to America from south of New Orleans and from Africa. Everyone was celebrating life in a way that is very musical. For me, it was so different than the punk rock thing. I am still an anger management punk rock dude! I still love the whole thing where the crowd is looking at the band and the band is looking at the crowd and everyone is like, “Fuck you, fuck you, I hate you, this sucks!” I loved that and then, all of a sudden, I am hanging out in these clubs that don’t have a cover charge, watching the most amazing musicians I had ever seen in my life and they are all smiling and happy. I was like, “Maybe it is time for me to stop screaming fuck you at everybody!” [laughs]

What is going on right now musically that has you excited? Anything we should keep an ear out for?

I just got back from SXSW and that is a crash course in what is happening right at this moment. A lot of the music I was hearing seemed familiar. I found myself saying, “Where have I heard this before?” My guitar player, Justin, who listens to the progressive radio station, The Current, in Minneapolis, said, “You probably heard it on The Current.” He was right. It was all the really fresh music that is coming out that is not hip-hop! I just thought it was bizarre that there was no jazz or anything like that at SXSW. It is pretty white. I love hip-hop. I am looking at a Lizzo record right now, who is a local artist. She is a singer and a rapper. A girl named Dessa.

My most recent discovery is Trixie Whitley. I was at the record store in Austin, Texas, called Waterloo. I grew up hanging out in record stores, so really love the feeling of being in a record store and talking to the clerk about what is going on with the new shit. I love that interaction and scouring the bins. Trixie Whitley is Chris Whitley‘s daughter. I was very close with Chris and I miss him. I always knew about Trixie. I was staying in Chris’s apartment in The Village in New York for a few months. There was a couple pictures of her around. She was 7 or 8 years old at the time. She was a kid who would occasionally come to her dad’s shows. I never actually witnessed it but she would dance around on stage or do something, I don’t know. Everybody said it was really awesome. Then she put out this album called Black Dub with Daniel Lanois. I met a lot of people who ended up being a part of some sort of post-Kingsway Studio community. It was this beautiful mansion in the French Quarter that had the most incredible gear. Chris [Whitley] had made a record there. He came back and visited quite a bit. He played on my solo record, this, that and the other thing. I have always been aware of Trixie and I knew there were producers, Lanois amongst them, who really loved Chris and really saw something there that was kind of magical. Trixie has taken that magic by the balls! It is ridiculous to me! She used to sound even more like her dad, which gives me shivers! I’m like, “Holy shit! I can hear her father in her voice and in the way she plays the guitar.” I put Trixie’s new record at the top of my list. I love it and think it is so good!

I listen to a lot of music. I mean, I bought 15 new CDs in the last week-and-a-half. That is the one that is really standing out to me. I also got the new Cage The Elephant record. I have been following that band since the first record. It has been interesting to watch them develop. I keep my ear to the tracks and listen to it all. I am really focusing on the jazz that is coming out of New Orleans and whatever Trombone Shorty is doing. I also love metal and hip-hop. I don’t really keep track of new country but I love old country music. I am always putting on something from Johnny Cash or Willie Nelson.

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When it comes to your body of work, how have you most evolved?

[laughs] I think I have devolved! [laughs] I had a Devo period there! Honestly, I guess it is kind of a constant reconstruction. You sorta have to build it up, break it down and figure out how the rhythm is fitting together. It is an ongoing learning experience. When I first got to New Orleans, I was very much into the fact that there wasn’t a lot of major chords going on. Coming from punk and folk music, it sounds really sophisticated to be listening to some really interesting chords, ya know? [laughs] It’s little things like that which are big things! It is learning how to play the drums was sort of essential to understanding how rhythm works on a trap kit. Those are ongoing things. I don’t know if my piano playing gets much better over the years but it certainly explores the instrument. It’s like the opposite of a Pandora’s box, things keep coming out of it that are cool! [laughs]

Where do you see yourself headed in the future musically as a solo artist or with Soul Asylum?

The solo thing is always something to fall back on and I think it is important for me to go do solo acoustic gigs just to keep the nerve sort of fresh. It kinda scares the hell out of me, so I have to do it now and again just to remember I can. [laughs] With those shows, I don’t have the comfort of having the band with me. I wanted the experience of making a solo record and I did it. Ultimately, I came back to the band. It’s like putting a really comfortable pair of jeans back on. I like being in a band and the gang sort of feeling. I also like that you are representing everybody, by being in a band, and not saying, “It’s all about me. What you are going to be hearing is a drummer, a bass player, two guitar players and a few dudes singing!” Hello! It’s Soul Asylum! That is what it is! It is much cooler, more fun and more exciting to people to be part of a team. I am happy that we are able to move it forward together.

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One last question before I let you go. I know you are big fan of Aquaman.

Oh yeah!

Are you excited about the push he seems to be getting in the DCU?

My Aquaman action figure still has the vintage orange and green outfit. I was at a comic con and I bought a DVD of all the animated shows. Originally, we had a band called the OGs and we had a song called “Superheroes.” The girl singer was Wonder Woman, the bass player was Superman and I was the drummer and I was Aquaman. We had this song where we each took a verse about our superhero adventures. [laughs] I hear he has some sort of a cameo in “Batman V. Superman,” I am not sure if it is true. Aquaman certainly seems to have a little bit of an elusiveness about him, ya know. I don’t think that will be spoiled by him getting more props from the DC world. I was also into the Sub-Mariner too. I’d be curious to know who would win that fight! [laughs]

Thanks for your time today, Dave!

Alright man, I appreciate you! Take care!

For all the latest news and developments on Soul Asylum, visit their official website at www.soulasylum.com. Connect with the band on social media via Facebook and Twitter.

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Zakk Wylde Debuts “Sleeping Dogs” From Forthcoming Solo LP

Zakk Wylde Debuts “Sleeping Dogs” From Forthcoming Solo LP

Zakk Wylde

Zakk Wylde

Guitar icon ZAKK WYLDE today has debuted an all new music video for the track “Sleeping Dogs” from his forthcoming solo LP. Long time collaborator Justin Reich was tapped to direct.  “Black Label Brethren O’ Doom Father Justin Reich Did Another Amazing job Directing the video,” says Wylde. “I asked Father Justin to capture the sights, sounds, smell and feel of the first day my parents dropped me off at kindergarten. Watching the video made me realize why I’m so fond of reading and vegetables.”

Grammy nominated, SLIPKNOT and STONE SOUR frontman COREY TAYLOR will appear on the “Sleeping Dogs” album version as well. Wylde continues, “Having Father Corey Taylor’s brilliant Voice sing on ‘Sleeping Dogs’ fulfilled my vision of the two of us as the modern day Simon & Garfunkel. We may not be as legendary, talented or as handsome as those two, but we’ve eaten at some of the same restaurants as them.”

“Sleeping Dogs,” “Tears of December” and “Lost Prayer” are now available as an iTunes instant gratification tracks, meaning fans who pre order the album on iTunes will get the single immediately. An additional pre order bundle is also available offering a Book Of Shadows II CD plus a 17″x11″ poster.

You can also find ZAKK WYLDE on the cover of the new April/May issue of REVOLVER MAGAZINE. The cover is being revealed for the first time today. Wylde is also on the cover of the May issue of GUITAR WORLD with legendary blues guitarist BUDDY GUY. Click here to view.

Zakk Wylde will release Book Of Shadows II on April 8th, 2016 via Entertainment One Music (eOne Music), his first solo release in 20 years. This release is the highly anticipated follow up to 1996’s Book of Shadows LP, a classic album Wylde released between his work with Ozzy Osbourne that has since become a fan favorite.

The fearlessly introspective melancholy and melody of Book of Shadows helped to make its follow-up one of Rolling Stone’s Most Anticipated Albums of 2016. As fierce and diverse as his work in Black Label Society and as large as his accomplishments as lead guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne have been, Book of Shadows II offers an even richer look into the spirit and psyche of one of the most beloved pillars of the hard rock community. Brand new tracks like “Sleeping Dogs,” “Tears of December,” “Darkest Hour,” “Harbors of Pity,” and “The King” are bold proclamations of intense feeling and powerful catharsis.

Zakk Wylde’s powerful pipes, mayhem-inducing charisma, mischievous humor, and instantly recognizable pinch-harmonic driven blues based histrionic guitar shredding have made him the world’s most beloved American Guitar Hero.

Keeping up with his road dog reputation Wylde has accumulated over the decades, he is treating 2016 no differently. Having just wrapped up a successful run on the The Hendrix Experience Tour featuring some of the biggest names in Rock N Roll celebrating the legacy of Jimi Hendrix. Wylde has wasted no time in announcing his participation in the 2016 Generation Axe Tour featuring Steve Vai, Yngwie Malmsteen, Nuno Bettencourt and Tosin Abasi. Click here for more info.

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Soul Asylum Releases “Doomsday” Single From Forthcoming Album; SXSW Dates Announced

Soul Asylum Releases “Doomsday” Single From Forthcoming Album; SXSW Dates Announced

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Soul Asylum has joined forces with Entertainment One Music (eOne Music) to release an album of all new material titled Change of Fortune on March 18th. To celebrate release week the band will be playing five shows at SXSW 2016.

””the new album shows a band still at the peak of their prowess, with clear potential for garnering whatever fortunes the future may hold” – Relix Magazine

SXSW shows include Thursday March 17 Grammy Museum’s ’40 Years of Ramones’ Tribute (Dave Pirner solo performance) at 9:15pm, Stand Up For Cancer Benefit at The Belmont at 12:30am, Friday March 18 Blurt Magazine / School Kidz Records party at 4pm, Saturday March 19 KGSR show at the W Hotel at 11:30am, Waterloo Records instore and electric set at 5pm and Official SXSW Showcase at The Scoot Inn at midnight.

Listen to “Doomsday” at this location > 

Change of Fortune’ is a straightforward rock & roll album led by Pirner’s poetic gift for storytelling and finds the frontman soul-searching along the way…while maintaining that signature Soul Asylum sound which so many fans love” – Innocent Words

Change of Fortune is the band’s eleventh studio album. Their career began with several indie releases on Minneapolis’ Twin/Tone that garnered them attention from a few major labels. The group signed with A&M Records in 1988 where they released three albums Clam Dip & Other DelightsHang TimeAnd the Horse They Rode In On. In 1992 Soul Asylum was signed to Columbia Records and released its groundbreaking album Grave Dancers Union, which included the Grammy Award winning “Runaway Train.” Soul Asylum followed up this success with Let Your Dim Light Shine in 1995, which climbed to #6 on the Billboard 200 and featured the #1 Modern Rock track “Misery.” After releasing Candy From a Stranger in 1998, the band members wanted to concentrate on writing and took a break from recording. The band reconvened in 2004 to begin work on their ninth full-length album, joined by a new drummer, Michael Bland. Sadly, shortly thereafter, bassist Karl Mueller was diagnosed with throat cancer and passed away after finishing his work on the new album.  The Silver Lining was released in 2006 and was dedicated to Karl’s life and memory. The band took a long and unscheduled hiatus as they grieved and dealt with the loss of their friend and band-mate.  In 2012 Soul Asylum released the aptly titled Delayed Reaction that was deemed “quick to embrace” by influential music blog Consequence of Sound.

“a perfectly blended mix of musical harmony” – ReadJunk

Soul Asylum is: David Pirner on guitar and vocals, Michael Bland on drums, Winston Roye on bass and Justin Sharbono on guitar.

https://www.facebook.com/SoulAsylum
www.soulasylum.com

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BOOK OF SHADOWS II: Zakk Wylde Debuts “Sleeping Dogs” Single,Album Art and Tracklist

BOOK OF SHADOWS II: Zakk Wylde Debuts “Sleeping Dogs” Single,Album Art and Tracklist

zaak-wylde-2016-1

Guitar icon ZAKK WYLDE today has debuted an all new single titled “Sleeping Dogs” from his forthcoming solo LP. Artwork, created by Wylde and longtime collaborator John Irwin, is being revealed today along with 14-song tracklisting. “Sleeping Dogs” will also be available as an iTunes instant gratification track, meaning fans who pre order the album on iTunes will get the single immediately.

An additional pre order bundle is also available offering a Book Of Shadows II CD signed by Zakk plus a 17″x11″ poster. Limited to 1,000 bundles.

'Book of Shadows II'

‘Book of Shadows II’

The track listing for Book of Shadows II is:

1. Autumn Changes
2. Tears of December
3. Lay Me Down
4. Lost Prayer
5. Darkest Hour
6. The Levee
7. Eyes of Burden
8. Forgotten Memory
9. Yesterday’s Tears
10. Harbors of Pity
11. Sorrowed Regret
12. Useless Apologies
13. Sleeping Dogs
14. The King

Zakk Wylde will release Book Of Shadows II on April 8th, 2016 via Entertainment One Music (eOne Music), his first solo release in 20 years. This release is the highly anticipated follow up to 1996’s Book of Shadows LP, a classic album Wylde released between his work with Ozzy Osbourne that has since become a fan favorite.

The fearlessly introspective melancholy and melody of Book of Shadows helped to make its follow-up one of Rolling Stone’s Most Anticipated Albums of 2016. As fierce and diverse as his work in Black Label Society and as large as his accomplishments as lead guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne have been, Book of Shadows II offers an even richer look into the spirit and psyche of one of the most beloved pillars of the hard rock community. Brand new tracks like “Sleeping Dogs,” “Tears of December,” “Darkest Hour,” “Harbors of Pity,” and “The King” are bold proclamations of intense feeling and powerful catharsis.

Zakk Wylde’s powerful pipes, mayhem-inducing charisma, mischievous humor, and instantly recognizable pinch-harmonic driven blues based histrionic guitar shredding have made him the world’s most beloved American Guitar Hero.

Keeping up with his road dog reputation Wylde has accumulated over the decades, he is treating 2016 no differently. Having just wrapped up a successful stint on the 2016 Axes and Anchors Cruise, Wylde wasted no time in announcing his participation in the 2016 Generation Axe Tour featuring Steve Vai, Yngwie Malmsteen, Nuno Bettencourt and Tosin Abasi. Click here for more info. Zakk is currently on tour with The Hendrix Experience Tour featuring some of the biggest names in Rock N Roll celebrating the legacy of Jimi Hendrix.

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Zakk Wylde To Release ‘Book Of Shadows II’ On April 8th, 2016

Zakk Wylde To Release ‘Book Of Shadows II’ On April 8th, 2016

Zakk Wylde

Zakk Wylde

Guitar icon Zakk Wylde will release Book Of Shadows II on April 8th, 2016 via Entertainment One Music (eOne Music), his first solo release in 20 years. This release is the highly anticipated follow up to 1996’s Book of Shadows LP, a classic album Wylde released between his work with Ozzy Osbourne that has since become a fan favorite. Book Of Shadows II was recently named as one of the “Most Anticipated Metal Releases of 2016” via Rollingstone.com.

Wylde has been feverishly working on new material since he wrapped up Black Label Society’s “Unblackened” spring tour last year. All songs on Book of Shadows II were recorded and produced at Wylde’s legendary home studio, The Black Vatican, which produced several of Wylde’s recent releases. The new effort will be followed by a wave of tour dates in support to be announced soon.

Zakk Wylde is no stranger to showing the lighter, introspective side of his music, having previously released two Black Label Society albums of stripped down material. The Song Remains Not the Same was released in 2011 which included acoustic versions of songs originally released on Order of the Black and 2013’s Unblackened, a live acoustic album that was recorded live at Club Nokia in Los Angeles.

Zakk will also be in full participation in this year’s NAMM Convention taking place at The Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, CA January 21-24. Zakk’s newly minted line of Guitars known as Wylde Audio will be on full display in Room 210-D and will be signing from 3pm – 5pm on Friday Jan 22. ZAKK SABBATH, a side project featuring guitarist/vocalist Wylde, bassist Blasko (OZZY OSBOURNE, ROB ZOMBIE) and drummer Joey Castillo (DANZIG, QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE) performing only BLACK SABBATH SONGS will be playing at The Grove of Anaheim Saturday January 23rd.

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Soul Asylum To Release New Album, “Change of Fortune,” In March 2016

Soul Asylum To Release New Album, “Change of Fortune,” In March 2016

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Soul Asylum partners with Entertainment One Music (eOne Music) to release an album of all new material titled Change of Fortune on March 18th, 2016. When asked about the band’s upcoming and 11th studio album, frontman David Pirner replied Everything on the menu is excellent.”

”We are thrilled to be working with such a great trailblazing band as Soul Asylum,” adds Chuck Oliner, Director of Marketing and Promotions, eOne Music.  “We wait to lead off 2016 with the first single from their new album Change of Fortune.  Loyal Soul Asylum fans will be blown away with the new album, and new fans will understand why we are all so excited they are back.   Welcome back Soul Asylum, and get ready to see Dave, Michael, Winston and Justin on tour in 2016.

The band’s PledgeMusic campaign offers pledger exclusives that include signed copies of the new album, your name in the liner notes, live and rare Grave Dancers Union download, custom t-shirt designed for Pledgers only, Skype drum workshop with Michael Bland, guest list for life, private acoustic show, private full band concert, original Dave Pirner artwork, vintage band promotional posters and much more. Pledging also allows access to a Pledger-only section of the site where the band is continuously posting video updates, audio clips and more. New pledger exclusives are being added weekly so check it out at www.pledgemusic.com/projects/soulasylum

After several indie releases on Minneapolis’ Twin/Tone Records and A&M, Soul Asylum released its groundbreaking album Grave Dancers Unionwhich included the Grammy Award winning “Runaway Train.” Soul Asylum followed up this success with Let Your Dim Light Shine in 1995which climbed to #6 on the Billboard 200 and featured the #1 Modern Rock track “Misery.” After releasing Candy From a Stranger in 1998, the band members wanted to concentrate on writing and took a break from recording. The band reconvened in 2004 to begin work on their ninth full-length album, joined by a new drummer, Michael Bland. Sadly, shortly thereafter, bassist Karl Mueller was diagnosed with throat cancer and passed away after finishing his work on the new album.  The Silver Lining was released in 2006 and was dedicated to Karl’s life and memory. The band took a long and unscheduled hiatus as they grieved and dealt with the loss of their friend and band-mate.  In 2012 Soul Asylum released the aptly titled Delayed Reaction that was deemed “quick to embrace” by influential music blog Consequence of Sound.

Change of Fortune is three years in the making, recorded while the band toured non-stop, had a few line-up changes and some soul searching, but upon listening to Change of Fortune, the wait is most certainly worth it.  Soul Asylum loyalists will be happy to discover the group’s trademark ragged-but-right sound is still very much intact.

The heart and soul of Soul Asylum remains and they continue to produce heartfelt and passionate rock n’ roll.  The band consists of David Pirner on guitar and vocals, Michael Bland on drums, Winston Roye on bass and Justin Sharbono on guitar.

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Drowning Pool Signs With eOne Music, To Release New LP In 2016

Drowning Pool Signs With eOne Music, To Release New LP In 2016

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Platinum selling metal act DROWNING POOL has announced a worldwide deal with eOne Music and plans to release a new LP next year. “We are truly honored to be part of the eOne family,” says the band. “We would like to thank eOne for not only their support, but also for allowing us the autonomy to make the record we envision.” The yet to be titled new record will be the band’s follow up to Resilience,released in 2013.

The band is currently in the studio with renowned producer Jason Suecof (AUGUST BURNS RED, DEICIDE, DEATH ANGEL) and will wrap production this fall. “We are excited to welcome Drowning Pool to the growing roster of bands at eOne,” says eOne VP of Metal/Rock Scott Givens. “I’m personally looking forward to unleashing the band’s new single later this year.”

Drowning Pool have beaten the darkness and now they celebrate life on life’s terms. The core trio of C.J. Pierce (guitar), Stevie Benton (bass) and Mike Luce (drums) mine hardship, struggle and disappointment to emerge victorious each time, crafting empowering hard rock anthems. Drowning Pool songs conjure emotions that deeply connect with those who persevere against the odds and sacrifice to survive, and their music transcends boundaries of race, class and lifestyle as well, resonating with people from all walks of life who look to music to get them through life’s challenges.

Jason Moreno’s powerful vocals enabled him to quickly master Drowning Pool’s dense catalog when he became the band’s frontman in 2012. From his reverent delivery of the late Dave Williams mosh-pit ready lyrics in the ubiquitous signature hit “Bodies,” to his powerful take on Top 5 Active Rock hits like “Step Up” from Desensitized (2004), “37 Stitches” from Full Circle (2007), and “Feel Like I Do” (Drowning Pool, 2010).

Moreno injects fresh life into the songs with his unique stamp. As Revolver Magazine noted in their review of Resilience: “Drowning Pool continue to produce consistently killer albums with an unmistakable sound.” 

Drowning Pool is: C.J. Pierce – Stevie Benton – Mike Luce – Jasen Moreno

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SIMPLICITY: Tesla’s Jeff Keith On His Career and the Band’s Powerful New Album!

SIMPLICITY: Tesla’s Jeff Keith On His Career and the Band’s Powerful New Album!

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When it comes to rock ‘n’ roll, few bands have become so deeply engrained in the hearts and minds of generations of music fans. With legions of dedicated fans around the world, Tesla has firmly carved out their own space in rock and roll history. Never a band who is content with reveling in their past successes, this group of dedicated artists continues to push forward and challenge themselves musically. Tesla has just unveiled a brand new LP titled ‘Simplicity’  which is now available via Tesla Electric Company Recording’s arrangement with Entertainment One Music and Distribution. ‘Simplicity’ is the band’s seventh studio full length LP and fifteenth release overall. 

For the ambitious album, the band locked themselves away for weeks writing the new material with long time A&R man Tom Zutaut on his 150 acre ranch in the woods of Virginia. There the band discovered and wrote the music that was still inside their imagination and quickly allowed the ideas to flow, transforming those ideas into 14 powerful tracks filled with emotional, powerful subjects relevant to the band’s current state. Legendary engineer Michael Wagener (Metallica, Skid Row, Motley Crue) was then tapped to put the final touches in place. Ultimately the process of making the album was very simple on a production level, but complex emotionally as the band and co-producer Tom Zutaut poured every ounce of passion and thought into the process during the two month period. This resulted in hours and hours of listening and collaborating over every detail but usually ending up being the most obvious choice; the simplest thing was always the best.

Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently sat down with Telsa frontman Jeff Keith to discuss his music roots, the evolution of his legendary band and their songwriting process, the creation of ‘Simplicity’ and much more.

Tesla's Jeff Keith

Tesla’s Jeff Keith

Anytime I talk to a musician, I like to take it back to the beginning and hear a little bit about their formative years. What are some of your first musical memories?

The first record I had growing up in Georgetown, California, the population was 900 and still is 900, is getting a “Peter Cottontail” record but I didn’t have a record player. Whenever I found someone who had a record player, I would have them play it for me. I loved singing “Here comes Peter Cottontail, hoppin’ down the bunny trail, hippity, hoppity Easter’s on its way! [laughs] Then I got a Davy Jones record, it was a solo record. Then I didn’t many records after that because it was so hard to find a record player. Then 8-Track tapes came along! My friends and I would pass around 8-Track tapes with no labels, so we never knew who the band was or what the label should have looked like because it was gone! We would put in those tapes and use a match book to make sure it played somewhat straight and enjoyed it. Sometimes during your favorite part of the song it would fade out and fade back in around track three or four!

Looking back on those early years, who would you consider some of your biggest influences?

The first concert I went to, when I was nineteen, was ‘Day On The Green.’ Aerosmith was headlining. There was also Foreigner, Pat Travers and AC/DC and Van Halen opened the show. It was 1978 and it was my first concert. There was all kinds of stuff that influenced me. Like I said, there were 8-Track tapes being passed around with stuff from the late 1960s, which was always a big influence; Jimi Hendrix and all that kind of stuff. There is stuff that I would never mention like Grand Funk, [sings] “Seems I got to have a change in scene, ’cause every night I have the strangest dreams.” There was also stuff like Foghat, Montrose and the big ones like the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Aerosmith and the list goes on and on. I have been so inspired by so many things!

Was there a catalyst of some sort that made you know pursuing a career in music was something you definitely had to do?

Jeff Keith

Jeff Keith

My brothers and I had a little living room band; we didn’t have a garage band when I lived in Georgetown. After work, we would jam in the living room and play our favorite Black Sabbath and AC/DC songs and so on and so on. The town I lived in had two bars, two gas stations, a post office and a volunteer fire department, so I didn’t have magazines to look at and say “I want to grow up and be that!” I drove a truck for seven years after I graduated high school from Oklahoma and went back to Georgetown. I am a Cinderella story. I joined City Kidd at age twenty-four. What got me to where I got an audition with City Kidd was I put on a Walkman with headphones and joined a contest down in Sacramento. There were two songs to choose from and I chose “Your Love Is Driving Me Crazy.” I won two hundred bucks from that contest. You would just sing into a live mic with the Walkman headset on and I could hear the crowd cheering. I came back to Georgetown, after I won my two hundred bucks, and all my friends were going “Little buddy, you should go down to Sacramento and be in a band.” I said, “I don’t know, man. I’m driving the truck. That just sounds too farfetched.” The next thing you know, these two girls who knew the City Kidd’s singer was quitting. It was a Wednesday night and they said “Come down to The Rock Factory tonight.” That was the place I did the contest with the Walkman. The next thing you know, they got me up with the band and I sang “You’re Love Is Driving Me Crazy.” I didn’t nothin’ about microphones, monitors or feedback. I didn’t know nothin’ about eating the microphone, as they call it. I happened to come over and share the mic with Frank [Hannon] and he heard me regular voice in his ear. The other guys, like Brian Wheat and a few others in the band at the time, said “We couldn’t hear nothin’! This guy knows nothin’ about nothin’ and we couldn’t even hear his voice.” Frank goes, “We shared the mic. I know he knows nothin’ about anything but I heard his natural voice and this is our guy!” That is what saved my career in City Kidd which was renamed Tesla when we were making the first record. That is my Cinderella story!

We are here to talk about Tesla’s new album, ‘Simplicity.’ A friend and I we talking recently about how the band has had a landmark album every ten years on “the four.” In 1994, you had ‘Bust A Nut.’ In 2004, you had a comeback album of sorts with ‘Into The Now.’ In 2014, what makes ‘Simplicity’ a significant record for the band this time around?

Tesla - 'Simplicity'

Tesla – ‘Simplicity’

Songwriting is my second favorite thing to do after performing. I love the process of writing songs. It all starts with a little idea and it builds. It goes over here and you try a few things that don’t work but you find something that does. The next thing you know, the song comes to an end result. I love the process. We always like to keep things fresh and write a new album whenever we get a chance. It always seems to have to do with four! [laughs] An album every four years, except for “Into The Now,” which was after four years of breaking up. That is why it was about 8 years! [laughs] We love the process of songwriting and we are passionate about writing songs, like I said, from the heart. We were grateful to be back together and we are grateful to still be together. We are stronger than ever! We have a new record out that we are very happy with, so happy with! We are excited to go out there and work extra hard to promote this new record. We love the way it came out and that is how we have always made records. We make a record we love and if you guys love it; we are in a great place! If you guys don’t like it and everyone around us says, “We think it’s shit,” we can always say, “Well, we love it and that is a great place to start!”

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Did you handle songwriting any differently this time around? What can you tell us about your process these days?

I will give you a little background. Dave Rude is a great guitar player and brings so much to the table with songwriting and playing. He is a great guy and a great person. When Tommy [Skeoch] was gone, first and foremost, we said we weren’t going to let the band breakup again and Frank found Dave Rude on MySpace or something, which is unheard of today! [laughs] At any rate, at that particular time, we found him on MySpace. My work theory is that I get a melody. I heard Paul McCartney say “It’s all about the melody,” so I come up with the melody from what the music is making me feel. Being there during the process of building the music and saying “Let’s go here. Let’s go there.” Dave gets me a feeling going and I get a melody. I hum the melody out and I just la-de-da a melody out. Most of the time I will write the verse and the chorus out. Then I will present it to the band and say “How do you like this idea and where it’s going? Otherwise, I am not going to keep presenting it.” The majority of the time, they will go “Love it, love it.” Frank and even Dave, on a few songs, helped me fill in the blanks for the second verse and chorus if we were changing it up.

Sometimes, those guys are even more prolific with words. I am just a dumb ass Okie and a truck driver from Georgetown, so if they get too prolific, I say “Remember, I am the guy going door to door selling this vacuum cleaner, so we have to knock it down a few notches because I can’t sell Shakespeare for ya!” They were really good with helping me fill in some blanks and stuff. It works really well and it was really a team effort on ‘Simplicity.’ I really loved it and everyone stepped up. Back in the days, they would all individually feed me songs. I would be holed up and they would feed me these songs and whichever ones I was clicking on, those are the ones that made the record for ‘Mechanical Resonance’ to ‘The Great Radio Controversy’ and all the way up to ‘Bust A Nut’ and ‘Into The Now.’ On this record, with time constraints, I need some help filling in some of blanks, ya know.

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The say you learn something from every new project. Looking back on bringing this album to life, what did you learn along the way?

We write a song called “MP3,” which is about the technology of today. There is a line in the song, “We’ve got to get back to simplicity” is in the chorus and that is why we named the record “Simplicity.” But yeah, I learned that with Pro Tools and all that stuff you can do 459,000 tracks but we always try to keep a live feel to it. Playing is live is what it ultimately boils down to because we always like to keep a live feel. With this new technology, you have to be careful of how many tracks you get going because you can put stack upon stack and not be able to recreate it live. In order to keep hold of the reigns and pull back on that stuff was definitely a learning experience. Of course, it was a team effort and from the heart, as I said. I learned that we are more grateful than ever to be still out here doing it. We are lovin’ every minute of it!

Tesla

Tesla

When you look back at your career, what do you consider the biggest evolution?

The thing that sticks out is that we have learned to be closer to each other than ever. We have always been brothers but we have been through so much. We have had this second chance after breaking up when I didn’t think we would be together ever again. We got back together and did ‘Into The Now,’ wrote it, mixed it and produced it ourselves. Like I said, to still be doing it today, we are just so grateful. Gratitude is definitely the most important thing that sticks out to me.

What is the best piece of advice you can pass along to aspiring musicians looking to pursue a career in the music industry in today’s climate?

Play from the heart and really live every single note and word. That way you will always have that satisfaction because a lot of times when you are trying to make it, back then or even today, you may never get that break but at least you always have the songs that come from the heart. Always speak from the heart!

Great advice! Thanks for your time today, Jeff. ‘Simplicity’ is certainly an album to be proud of! We look forward to spreading the word!

Awesome! Thank you very much, Jason! Take care!

Get the latest news and tour dates directly from Tesla at their official website, www.teslatheband.com. Connect with the band on Facebook.com and Twitter.

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