Tag Archive | "hank williams III"

DEVILDRIVER To Release Star-Studded Outlaw Country Covers Album “Outlaws ‘Til The End”

DEVILDRIVER To Release Star-Studded Outlaw Country Covers Album “Outlaws ‘Til The End”

Globally renowned, chart-topping band DEVILDRIVER may be one of the most notable groups in metal, but their personal taste in music reaches far beyond heavy music. Thanks to widely lauded albums like 2005’s epoch-shredding The Fury Of Our Maker’s Hand, 2011’s ante-upping, ultra-brutal Beast and 2016’s acclaimed career peak Trust No One, the band – led by iconic vocalist Dez Fafara – are firmly established as one of the most consistent and best loved bands in modern metal. That said, in 2018, all expectations of who and what DEVILDRIVER are will be torched.

As first teased by Fafara last year, the band’s upcoming full-length album of outlaw country-gone-metal anthems, Outlaws ‘Til The End, will finally see its day. The highly-anticipated, monstrous collection of savage metal interpretations will be released via Napalm Records on July 6, 2018, and pre-orders are available now in multiple formats via http://smarturl.it/OutlawsTilTheEnd-NPR with more format options coming soon. Merchandise such as t-shirts, long-sleeve shirts, flasks, keychains, and more are available here: www.indiemerch.com/devildriver/pre-orders

Head to Rolling Stone Country now to hear a clip of DEVILDRIVER’s cover of Hank3’s “Country Heroes”, featuring Hank3 himself, and read all about Outlaws ‘Til The End: https://www.rollingstone.com/country/news/devildriver-recruit-hank-3-for-outlaws-til-the-end-album-w518419

Outlaws ‘Til The End is both a startling curveball and a ferocious statement of individuality from a band who have been a constant and effective force in the heavy metal world for the best part of two decades now. “I think real music has always gotten to me, whether it’s the blues or even real Goth music like Bauhaus and Sisters Of Mercy, as well as outlaw country greats like Johnny Cash, Wayne “The Train” Hancock, and Willie Nelson,” Fafara explains. “That stuff has always attracted me, and this is absolutely the real McCoy. The blues and outlaw country are what made rock n’ roll. They were around before rock n’ roll… and in my head, I’ve always heard these songs heavy.”

From the opening seconds of Hank3’s”Country Heroes” onward, Outlaws ‘Til The End is simply one of the most invigorating records the band have made yet. More importantly, these evocative, irresistible songs have all been wholly rebuilt from the ground up, powered by the classic DEVILDRIVER sound and embellished with Fafara’s unmistakable feral roar. Outlaws ‘Til The End was produced, mixed and recorded with Steve Evetts (Dillinger Escape Plan, Every Time I Die, Sepultura, The Cure), with Devildriver guitarist Mike Sprietzer also lending recording talents. The album was mastered by renowned engineer Alan Douches.

Completing this unprecedented project is a host of metal and country luminaries providing unforgettable cameos: horror metal icon Wednesday13 lends his incensed rasp to George Jones’ “If Drinking Don’t Kill Me”, 36 Crazyfists frontman Brock Lindow brings fire and soul to Steve Earle’s, “Copperhead Road”, and Fear Factory’s Burton C. Bell helps to turn Richard Thompson’s anti-war classic, “Dad’s Gonna Kill Me”, into a brooding gothic metal extravaganza. Meanwhile, Lamb of God members Randy Blythe and Mark Morton contribute to an exhilarating decimation of Willie Nelson’s “Whiskey River” before Randy makes a second appearance on DEVILDRIVER’s version of cowboy standard “Ghost Riders In The Sky”; the latter featuring the son of Johnny Cash himself.

DEVILDRIVER Outlaws ‘Til The End track listing:

1. “Country Heroes”
Written by Hank Williams III
Performed by Hank3 & Dez Fafara

2. “Whiskey River”
Written by Johnny Bush and Paul Stroud; recorded by Willie Nelson
Performed by Randy Blythe, Mark Morton of Lamb of God & Dez Fafara

3. “Outlaw Man”
Written by David Blue; recorded by the Eagles
Performed by Dez Fafara & Neal Tiemann of DEVILDRIVER

4. “Ghost Riders in the Sky”
Written by Stan Jones
Performed by John Carter Cash, Ana Cristina Cash, Randy Blythe & Dez Fafara

5. “I’m the Only Hell (Mama Ever Raised)”
Written by Bobby Bobby Borchers, Wayne Kemp, Mack Vickery; recorded by Johnny Paycheck
Performed by Dez Fafara & DEVILDRIVER

6. “If Drinking Don’t Kill Me (Her Memory Will)”
Written by Harlan Sanders, Rick Beresford; recorded by George Jones
Performed by Wednesday13 & Dez Fafara

7. “The Man Comes Around”
Written by Johnny Cash
Performed by Lee Ving of Fear & Dez Fafara

8. “A Thousand Miles From Nowhere”
Written by Dwight Yoakam
Performed by Dez Fafara & Neal Tiemann of DEVILDRIVER

9. “Copperhead Road”
Written by Steve Earle
Performed by Brock Lindow of 36 Crazyfists & Dez Fafara

10. “Dad’s Gonna Kill Me”
Written by Richard Thompson
Performed by Burton C. Bell of Fear Factory & Dez Fafara

11. “A Country Boy Can Survive”
Written by Hank Williams Jr.
Performed by Dez Fafara & DEVILDRIVER

12. “The Ride”
Written by J.B. Detterline Jr., Gary Gentry; recorded by David Allan Coe
Performed by Lee Ving of Fear & Dez Fafara

“I knew right away that I wanted to have guests on this record, and the first guest I wanted was John Carter Cash,” Fafara recalls. “I didn’t want this thing to exist without John, without Hank3 or without Randy [Blythe]. Basically, there were a certain amount of guests that I definitely wanted on it, but as I kept asking people, everyone kept saying yes! Randy and Mark [Morton] are both from the country and they were immediately on board. With John, we wound up talking for two hours when we first met, all about his love of heavy metal and my love of outlaw country and my love of his dad’s music. All he wanted to do was talk about metal and all I wanted to do was talk about outlaw country. It was the craziest thing.”

Not only just content with a collaboration with John Carter Cash, the album also features the iconic voice of Fear, US punk rock legend Lee Ving. “Lee has a country band called Range War and when he first started in music, his mother gave him her mandolin to play, so he played country music before he ever did punk rock,” Fafara notes. “I’ve been fortunate enough in my career to do songs with Ozzy and some of the greats, but doing a song with Lee Ving? What can I say… he’s my ultimate hero in life. I had a Fear shirt on the first time I ran away from home, you know?”

Still charging forward, proudly against the grain and on the form of their lives, DEVILDRIVER have never made a record like Outlaws ‘Til The End before. But then, nor has anyone else.The perfect marriage of badass country grit and neck-wrecking groove metal supremacy, it’s a pistol-packing game-changer delivered by true heavy metal outlaws.

Stay tuned for more new music and videos coming soon in anticipation of Outlaws ‘Til The End.

Upcoming DEVILDRIVER performances:
7/12 – Oshkosh, WI @ Rock USA
7/15 – Mansfield, OH @ The World-Famous Historic Ohio State Reformatory, Home of the “Shawshank Prison” – INKCARCERATION Music and Tattoo Festival

DEVILDRIVER online:
www.devildriver.com
www.facebook.com/devildriver
www.twitter.com/devildriver
www.instagram.com/devildriver

DEVILDRIVER is:
Dez Fafara – Vocals
Mike Spreitzer – Guitar
Neal Tiemann – Guitar
Diego Ibarra – Bass
Austin D’Amond – Drums

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HANK3 Kicks Off the Third Leg of His Full U.S. Tour On August 10th

HANK3 Kicks Off the Third Leg of His Full U.S. Tour On August 10th

Hank3, the most infamous hellbilly rock n’ roll outlaw of all time, will kick off the third leg of his already-popular 2012 U.S. tour this week on Friday, August 10th in Fort Worth, TX! The tour begins at the Rail Club and will blaze through several western states up until September 4thwhen it comes to a stop in Boulder, CO at the Boulder Theater. See below for all current tour dates and stay tuned for updates.

Late last year, music legend Hank3 released four new records to fans simultaneously—an action unprecedented in his career. These titles include Ghost to a Ghost/GuttertownAttention Deficit Domination and 3 Bar Ranch Cattle Callin. The records were released through his own record label, Hank3 Records, in distribution partnership with Megaforce Records (MRI). Hank3’s U.S. tour is his chance to commemorate these new albums and share a personal, candid set with his dedicated fans. The only way fans can be sure to witness this rare opportunity is to get tickets now through their local venue!

HANK3 TOUR DATES:

8/10 – Ft. Worth, TX @ Rail Club

8/11 – Austin, TX @ Emos

8/14 – Albuquerque, NM @ Sunshine Theater

8/15 – Tempe, AZ @ Marquee Theater

8/17 – Los Angeles, CA @ House of Blues

8/18 – Las Vegas, NV @ House of Blues

8/19 – San Diego, CA @ House of Blues

8/22 – Santa Cruz, CA @ The Catalyst

8/24 – San Francisco, CA @ Regency Ballroom

8/25 – Reno, NV @ Knitting Factory

8/26 – Redway, CA @ Deans Creek Campground

8/28 – Portland, OR @ Roseland Theatre

8/29 – Missoula, MT @ Wilma Theater

8/30 – Spokane, WA @ Knitting Factory

9/1 – Seattle, WA @ Showbox Studio

9/2 – Boise, ID @ Knitting Factory

9/3 – Salt Lake City. UT @ In The Venue

9/4 – Boulder, CO @ Boulder Theater

 

For more information on Hank3 and his upcoming tour, please visit http://www.hank3.com/.

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A New Beginning: Hank Williams III Talks Creative Freedom & New Albums!

A New Beginning: Hank Williams III Talks Creative Freedom & New Albums!

Hank Williams III has spent the better part of twenty years on the road, developing his own unique style and amassing legions of devoted fans, all while carrying the torch for his grandfather’s legacy and the other country outlaws who paved the way. Recently released from the creative shackles that had been binding him at Curb Records, Hank III spent the early part of 2011 holed up in his studio at The Haunted Ranch fanning his creative flames and piecing together a monstrous new project. His hard work and undying devotion to his art has resulted in an unprecedented three album release – the double-country ‘Ghost to a Ghost/Guttertown,’ the doom-rock ‘Attention Deficient Domination,’ and the speed metal ‘Cattle Callin’. All three of the albums are to be released on September 6th through his very own, just-launched label Hank3 Records. With a full tour on the horizon to boot, there is little doubt that 2011 will shape up to be one of his biggest years to date. Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with Hank III to discuss his epic release, the challenges involved with that huge undertaking, the misconceptions that surround him, his hopes for preserving his grandfather’s legacy at The Grand Ole Opry and much more.

No one knows better than you about being chained creatively after your long sentence with Curb Records. Did you do anything to celebrate your release?Nah, man. I just started writing and playing. The winter time around here is kinda depressing anyway, but there was no big party or anything like that. My big party was creating something all over again musically. I was just glad to finally be done with that, have it behind me and I was looking forward to the new beginning.You have definitely been busy creatively. Why did you decide to drop all of the albums at the same time?

Basically, I just wanted to do something in my eyes that is d

ifferent. I don’t think that it has ever been done before as far as approaching three different genres at once. Yeah, there have been cross-over songs and a bunch or different people have recorded different styles of songs but I don’t think releasing that many different records in that many different genres has been done. Another reason I wanted to do it was to get back on the road and concentrate on that for the next two years. I think that this is the first time ever, out of my whole career, that I have ever had a record come out and then be able to do a tour. That is just not how I am. I tour because I tour. That’s what I do! I just wanted to come out of the gate strong, that was another inspiration!Did you feel any more pressure this time around seeing that you are finally free of those creative shackles?It was definitely getting to me. The workload was pretty massive with doing the recording aspect, the playing aspect, the mixing, the mastering, the artwork on all of it! Yeah! I was getting pretty spun out from the process but hard work pays off and who knows if I will ever have the type of energy to pull something off like this again. It was tiring but exciting all at the same time.

What can you tell us about the writing process for these albums? Did it vary from album to album?

Basically, I started with the country first. I would be a little more serious for about eight or nine hours in the daytime. As the nighttime would come in, I would sorta switch gears. I would either play guitars on the “Attention Deficit Domination” stuff or start working on the “Cattle Callin’” record. So I kept it serious during the daytime but then I would loosen up and have a little bit more fun at night. I did that daily from 8 a.m. until I couldn’t go any further. So, half and half. That is where a lot of those ambient sounds and some of the weirder stuff on the “Guttertown” record came from, just havin’ fun and experimenting a little more at night.

Were there any specific influences that were ringing in your head at night while you were putting that together?

There are all kinds of different vibes on that album. You definitely have got a little bit of a Charlie Daniels influence, a little bit of a Primus influence, you’ve got your weird ambient sounds like Sunn O))). I don’t know where you would say that some of the Latino or Mexican flavored sort of stuff comes from. All sorts of different stuff. As far as the “ADD” record, there is definitely some Sleep and The Melvins influence for sure. On the country album, there is a little bit of something from everywhere. Yeah, there are a few country songs on this record but there is a lot of stuff that isn’t considered country at all in my eyes. We’ve got a bunch of Cajun influence on there like Nathan Abshire and those old Cajun guys definitely had a lot of influence on the “Guttertown” record.

You have some guest appearances along the way. What can you tell us about those and how they shaped up?

As far as Hellstomper, I was raised listening to a band called Hellstomper and a lot of my sound came from them. I was always a big fan. He has a song called “Don’t Sing My Songs.” “You can steal my wife, you can have my dog, you can take my car, just don’t sing my songs.” I called him up and said, “Man, I’ve got a song that sounds too much like ya’ll. A. I need permission and B. will you sing on it with me?” So, it was cool to have Alan King come in and lay down his tracks. Les Claypool is on the “Time To Die” song. I just went out and gave him a whole bunch of classic country stuff, I made a little package for him. I said, “It would be awesome if you might consider playing on a track one day.” I grew up with that band and all of his projects. He has been a huge influence just because he is just so open minded and does so many different things musically. It was awesome to have him be a part of it. The same kinda thing unfolded with Tom Waits. We had talked about it for a while and he did that “Mojo” piece on me, so we got to be in person and get to know each other a little bit so that it felt more natural for him. He definitely liked the Cajun style and ended the record with “Ghost to Ghost” song. That was definitely epic for us! The last two are Dave Sherman from Earthride, which is a stoner rock/doom metal band, T-Roy from Sourvein, which is also a doom rock band. As I recall, those are all the outsiders that are on the record.

That is great stuff. Anybody else you are interested in collaborating with in the long term?

There are so many, man! Ya know, Wayne Hancock and I have been talking about making a WH/HW album for a long time. It is hard to say, ya know. Sometimes I write songs and I have people in mind but who knows. There is so much influence, whether it is Buzz from The Melvins, The Reverend Horton Heat, Mike Patton or Dave Lombardo from Slayer, the list goes on and on. We will have to see what the future holds, man.

Let’s talk a little about “Attention Deficit Domination.” This focuses a lot on your life as a percussionist. Is that something you have been looking forward to doing for a while now?

I have been wantin’ to slow it down. For so many years, I have played so fast in Assjack and never have gotten to feel the groove as much. So I was lookin’ to slow it down, basically. Yes, there is a lot of percussion on that record, you’ve got an acoustic drum set and a Roland drum set. It was a lot of fun for me to slow it down and sludgin’ out. That is another part of my career that I haven’t had the opportunity to focus on much. We have been playing it a lot lately, gettin’ it ready to bring on the road. We’ll see where it goes from there. Bands like Black Sabbath, Pentagram, The Melvins, Sleep, Earthride — all of those kinda bands had so much influence on that style of music and I am listening on the past, I am stuck on the old stuff. We’re playing with older gear and doing all these things to pay respect to that kinda sound.

“Cattle Callin’” is one of the more unique records that I have heard in a while. What spawned the idea for “Cattle Core?”

Well, I was kinda raised around that a good bit. I have worked cattle, my granddad used to take me to the auctioning barns. I’ve branded cattle, I’ve had to drag them off the side of the field, I’ve herded them, so I have definitely been around it. I have always had a fascination with the auctioneers’ speed. Most of the guys that I wanted to use, I didn’t get a chance to use because they just didn’t feel right and thought that I might be pokin’ fun at them. I mean, if you type in Hank III and do a quick read about me, you might see some negative stuff out there. [laughs] A lot of these men were 70-years-old and not wanting to associate themselves with me. But, thank god for guys like Tim Dowler out of Canada, Mitch Jordan and Jason Miller, who let me create my vision and take it to the next level. I just thought it was an interesting fit, kinda like shining a different kinda light on the heavy metal stuff. It was a lot of fun creating it and getting to know these guys as well. It was pretty exciting! I am already hopin’ that I get permission from the guys that weren’t interested this time around to bring them in for the next go-round. I have been trying really hard to find that one kid that might want to come out on the road, so that we can have a real auctioneer on stage as opposed to workin’ around samples. That is something that we are trying to piece together.

You recorded all of these albums at your studio, The Haunted Ranch. You seem very comfortable there. What can you tell us about the place?

It just has a really laid back feelin’ to it. The whole house is dedicated to music, it is gear everywhere, cables, posters! I mean, the whole kitchen is full of pedals. I don’t know, it is a real comfortable feel. I have had a lot of bands come through and say that they feel at home here. It’s not uptight. You walk into some studios and automatically feel nervous, I guess because it is so nice or so well kept. I guess this place just has kind of a work vibe to it. If you get freaked out from the work side of things, you can go outside and relax for a bit. It is a whole house dedicated to music, man. A lot of different sounds. The rooms kinda flip-flop. Sometimes we will use one as a drum room but then it will turn into a vocal room, stuff like that. It’s one of a kind for sure.

What was the biggest challenge in putting the whole package together in such a short time-frame?

The hardest part, I would say, was the mixing process. At that point, my gears were already gettin’ kinda burnt and it was hard to have the patience that comes with working on a mix for what is supposed to sound good. I’ve already blown my ears doin’ 20 years on the road and never wearing any earplugs. That makes things a bit harder. The writing was fine but someone like me, you pick it apart so much that there is a certain time that you have to let go and say, “OK, that’s it! I already spent a week on this song and 200 tries to get it where it supposedly sounds good.” That is definitely the hardest part of the process for me.

What can we expect from your new label, Hank3 Records? Are you looking to develop new projects with this outlet?

I am gonna just worry about puttin’ out my stuff. I don’t want to ever be in the position to do another musician wrong or make them feel like they didn’t get what they deserved. That is kind of a tough situation to be in and I think that since I have so many different sounds, I can just worry about puttin’ out what I do and that will be enough. I am just lookin’ forward to havin’ a chance to do whatever it is that I want to do. If I want to do this or if I want to do a sci-fi record, well that could be next. It will be great not to have to go through so many different lawyers to make music. It will be a great thing for me.

That has to be a breath of fresh air for you.

Absolutely, man! There is a lot of new creativity happening and I am looking forward to seeing what it brings out of me.

You touched on it briefly but what do you think is the biggest misconception out there about you at this point in your career?

It’s hard to say. Maybe people think I am a super stoned out, drugged out kid but there is a shitload of work that I do. If you have seen one of my live shows, you can see that. Writers that were sayin’ 10 years ago that I was ridin’ the coat tails of the Hank WIlliams name, well, maybe they see things differently now. I am definitely not takin’ the easy road, I am just doin’ what I do and that is being a musician and playing music. I don’t know. I take pride in doing the longest show for the cheapest ticket price, man! We started out with a crew and a bus out there for seven bucks. Now I am able to keep it runnin’ as a national act for about 24 bucks. I take pride in that. I think that it is a time to give, especially right now with everything going on with the economy. We play to the working man and woman out there. That is what we are proud of.

We aren’t getting any younger, Shelton. What kind of a toll does touring and playing these extended sets take on you both physically and mentally?

Man, that is a day by day thing! I will deal with that when I get back out there! I have always had a history of being sick on the road. The voice will be there for a week and then it will be gone for a week. I will be strong for a week and then I am barely able to do it but man, I live for that moment on stage. I do whatever I can to prepare to have a good voice for any given night, sometimes it is there, sometimes it’s not. My goal has always been to work the road as hard as I can until I am at least 50 but look at Lemmy. Look at Willie. Look at these guys that are just knockin’ it out and takin’ it to the next level! So who knows, where I will be but I git the rest of my life to play short shows! Right now I have the energy and I am focused on keepin’ it a long show with all the different genres for all of our crowds out there.

Do you think that somewhere down the line when you do start slowin’ down that we might get an autobiography out of you to get an idea of all that has gone on behind the scenes and on the road?

That would definitely be interesting. Writing is hard for me due to my A.D.D. and the dyslexia and stuff like that, it has always been a challenge for me. But yeah, in time I think it could be an interesting book but I think I have a few more stories to live out there before I settle into writing one. But, I bet it would be interesting for sure!

One of the biggest blunders in music history is the fact that your grandfather is not a member of the Grand Ole Opry. Why do you think this has dragged on for so long and what can we, as fans, do to help right that wrong?

To me it is a simple matter of respect. Why they just won’t bring him back into the circle these days after the fact is just way beyond me. The biggest thing that I would like to see is just a ceremony or a dedication saying, “Tonight we are bringing Hank Williams back into the circle.” Whether it is a statue in front of The Grand Ole Opry or a show that is dedicated to reinstating his name would mean all of the world to me and to his legacy. It is a matter of respect and you should show respect where it is due. Tom Waits, his piece that he did in the “Mojo” magazine, basically sums it up. Right now, it’s the same ol’, same ol’. People can just talk about it, spread the word, sign the petition, cross their fingers and keep bugging these people to provide a respectful closing to say “Welcome Back.” It is as simple as that.

We will help spread the word on that and your new releases, Hank! Thanks for your time and all the best to you. We will see you on the road!

Thank you, man! I appreciate it!

For the latest news on Hank Williams III, all of his musical ventures and upcoming tour dates, visit his official website at www.hank3.com

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Pantera’s 20th Anniversary Edition Of ‘Cowboys From Hell’ Now Streaming!

Pantera’s 20th Anniversary Edition Of ‘Cowboys From Hell’ Now Streaming!

The 20th Anniversary Edition of PANTERA’s Cowboys From Hell is currently streaming in its entirety on AOL’s Full CD Listening Party at this location. The Deluxe and Expanded editions of Pantera’s Cowboys From Hell were released on September 14th at all retail outlets, including Pantera.com and Rhino.com.

Check out Icon Vs. Icon’s recent interview with Pantera frontman Phil Anselmo at this location >

PANTERA found its growl and groove on COWBOYS FROM HELL, a landmark album whose bone-powdering intensity, razor-sharp riffing and pummeling rhythmic assault represented a turning point in modern metal when it was released in 1990. More than just PANTERA’s major label debut, many consider this album to be the official debut of the PANTERA lineup with singer Philip Anselmo, guitarist “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott, his brother, drummer Vinnie Paul and bassist Rex Brown.

To celebrate the 20-year anniversary of COWBOYS FROM HELL, Rhino rounds up a three-disc Ultimate Edition, a three-disc Deluxe Edition, and a two-disc Expanded Edition. All three editions include a newly remastered version of the original album along with unreleased and rare live performances from the “Cowboys From Hell” Tour.

The Ultimate and Deluxe Editions will also feature a disc of unreleased demos for nearly every album track, plus, “The Will To Survive,” a previously unreleased song recorded during the album’s sessions.

“’The Will To Survive’ is a great track. With so many killer songs, it was hard to pick and choose the ones that should make our major label debut,” says Paul. “After hearing it for the first time in about 20 years, its a pretty stellar performance and I am definitely proud that it will see the light of day for all the die hard PANTERA fans around the world! It shows the true musical diversity of the band at that time!”

The Deluxe and Expanded Editions of COWBOYS FROM HELL will be released September 14 at all retail outlets, including www.pantera.com and www.rhino.com. The Deluxe Edition will be available for a suggested list price of $29.98 (physical) and $17.99 (digital) and the Expanded Edition for $19.98 (physical) and $12.99 (digital).

The Ultimate Edition will feature all three discs included in the Deluxe Edition and will be housed in an intricate box including several replica memorabilia pieces from the Cowboys era. The Ultimate Edition will be available on November 23 and final pre-order details, as well as the contents, will be unveiled soon on PANTERA’s Facebook page <http://www.facebook.com/Pantera>.

Pantera... in simpler times.

Along with the remastered version of COWBOYS FROM HELL, all three sets include a disc of live music recorded during the tour for the album. It begins with seven unreleased performances from PANTERA’s September 15, 1990 appearance at the Foundations Forum metal convention in California, a show recorded for radio broadcast but never released commercially. The remainder of the disc contains the five-song EP Alive And Hostile, a collection of performances recorded in 1991 at the Monsters of Rock festival in Moscow that was previously available only in Australia as part of a 1994 boxed set.

The Ultimate and Deluxe Editions of COWBOYS FROM HELL include a third disc that contains the previously unreleased “The Will To Survive,” along with demos for 10 of the album’s 12 songs, including early versions of the title track, “Psycho Holiday,” “The Art Of Shredding” and “Cemetery Gates.”

After being turned down “twenty-eight times by every major label on the face of the earth,” ATCO Records A&R rep Mark Ross saw the band when Hurricane Hugo stranded him in Texas. The rest, as they say, is history, including another seven years and over a million miles of touring for COWBOYS to be certified Platinum (one million album sales) by the RIAA.

The album’s liner notes include essays by each of the band’s surviving members, producer Terry Date, and the aforementioned Ross. Recalling the first time he saw Pantera, Ross writes, “By the end of the first song, my jaw was on the floor. The sonic power of it all—the attitude and the musicianship—blew me away. Basically, you had to be an idiot to not think they’re amazing. I mean, how could you see these guys and not think, Holy shit!?
PANTERA
COWBOYS FROM HELL
Disc One – Ultimate, Deluxe, and Expanded Editions
1.    “Cowboys From Hell”
2.    “Primal Concrete Sledge”
3.    “Psycho Holiday”
4.    “Heresy”
5.    “Cemetery Gates”
6.    “Domination”
7.    “Shattered”
8.    “Clash With Reality”
9.    “Medicine Man”
10.  “Message In Blood”
11.  “The Sleep”
12.  “The Art Of Shredding”

Disc Two – Ultimate, Deluxe, and Expanded Editions
(Tracks 1-7 Recorded Live at Foundations Forum, Los Angeles, CA 9/15/90)
(Tracks 8-12 Recorded at For Those About to Rock: Monsters in Moscow, 1991)
1.    “Domination” – Live*
2.    “Psycho Holiday” – Live*
3.    “The Art Of Shredding” – Live*
4.    “Cowboys From Hell” – Live*
5.    “Cemetery Gates” – Live*
6.    “Primal Concrete Sledge” – Live*
7.    “Heresy” – Live*
8.    “Domination” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
9.    “Primal Concrete Sledge” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
10.  “Cowboys From Hell” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
11.  “Heresy” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
12.  “Psycho Holiday” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†

Disc Three – Ultimate and Deluxe Editions Only
1.    “The Will To Survive”*
2.    “Shattered” – Demo*
3.    “Cowboys From Hell” – Demo*
4.    “Heresy” – Demo*
5.    “Cemetery Gates” – Demo*
6.    “Psycho Holiday” – Demo*
7.    “Medicine Man” – Demo*
8.    “Message In Blood” – Demo*
9.    “Domination” – Demo*
10.  “The Sleep” – Demo*
11.  “The Art Of Shredding” – Demo*

* Previously Unreleased
† Unreleased in the U.S
(COWBOYS FROM HELL originally released on July 24, 1990)

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Pantera To Premiere Unreleased Track “The Will to Survive” Via Facebook On August 30th

Pantera To Premiere Unreleased Track “The Will to Survive” Via Facebook On August 30th

Rock legends Pantera will be premiering the track ‘The Will to Survive’ on their official Facebook Page at Noon EST on August 30th. The track is from the Deluxe and Expanded editions of Pantera’s Cowboys From Hell will be released September 14th at all retail outlets, including Pantera.com and Rhino.com.

Check out the packaging for the three-CD Deluxe 20th Anniversary Edition of Cowboys From Hell below:

PANTERA found its growl and groove on COWBOYS FROM HELL, a landmark album whose bone-powdering intensity, razor-sharp riffing and pummeling rhythmic assault represented a turning point in modern metal when it was released in 1990. More than just PANTERA’s major label debut, many consider this album to be the official debut of the PANTERA lineup with singer Philip Anselmo, guitarist “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott, his brother, drummer Vinnie Paul and bassist Rex Brown.

To celebrate the 20-year anniversary of COWBOYS FROM HELL, Rhino rounds up a three-disc Ultimate Edition, a three-disc Deluxe Edition, and a two-disc Expanded Edition. All three editions include a newly remastered version of the original album along with unreleased and rare live performances from the “Cowboys From Hell” Tour.

The Ultimate and Deluxe Editions will also feature a disc of unreleased demos for nearly every album track, plus, “The Will To Survive,” a previously unreleased song recorded during the album’s sessions.

“’The Will To Survive’ is a great track. With so many killer songs, it was hard to pick and choose the ones that should make our major label debut,” says Paul. “After hearing it for the first time in about 20 years, its a pretty stellar performance and I am definitely proud that it will see the light of day for all the die hard PANTERA fans around the world! It shows the true musical diversity of the band at that time!”

The Deluxe and Expanded Editions of COWBOYS FROM HELL will be released September 14 at all retail outlets, including www.pantera.com and www.rhino.com. The Deluxe Edition will be available for a suggested list price of $29.98 (physical) and $17.99 (digital) and the Expanded Edition for $19.98 (physical) and $12.99 (digital).

The Ultimate Edition will feature all three discs included in the Deluxe Edition and will be housed in an intricate box including several replica memorabilia pieces from the Cowboys era. The Ultimate Edition will be available on November 23 and final pre-order details, as well as the contents, will be unveiled soon on PANTERA’s Facebook page <http://www.facebook.com/Pantera>.

Pantera... in simpler times.

Along with the remastered version of COWBOYS FROM HELL, all three sets include a disc of live music recorded during the tour for the album. It begins with seven unreleased performances from PANTERA’s September 15, 1990 appearance at the Foundations Forum metal convention in California, a show recorded for radio broadcast but never released commercially. The remainder of the disc contains the five-song EP Alive And Hostile, a collection of performances recorded in 1991 at the Monsters of Rock festival in Moscow that was previously available only in Australia as part of a 1994 boxed set.

The Ultimate and Deluxe Editions of COWBOYS FROM HELL include a third disc that contains the previously unreleased “The Will To Survive,” along with demos for 10 of the album’s 12 songs, including early versions of the title track, “Psycho Holiday,” “The Art Of Shredding” and “Cemetery Gates.”

After being turned down “twenty-eight times by every major label on the face of the earth,” ATCO Records A&R rep Mark Ross saw the band when Hurricane Hugo stranded him in Texas. The rest, as they say, is history, including another seven years and over a million miles of touring for COWBOYS to be certified Platinum (one million album sales) by the RIAA.

The album’s liner notes include essays by each of the band’s surviving members, producer Terry Date, and the aforementioned Ross. Recalling the first time he saw Pantera, Ross writes, “By the end of the first song, my jaw was on the floor. The sonic power of it all—the attitude and the musicianship—blew me away. Basically, you had to be an idiot to not think they’re amazing. I mean, how could you see these guys and not think, Holy shit!?
PANTERA
COWBOYS FROM HELL
Disc One – Ultimate, Deluxe, and Expanded Editions
1.    “Cowboys From Hell”
2.    “Primal Concrete Sledge”
3.    “Psycho Holiday”
4.    “Heresy”
5.    “Cemetery Gates”
6.    “Domination”
7.    “Shattered”
8.    “Clash With Reality”
9.    “Medicine Man”
10.  “Message In Blood”
11.  “The Sleep”
12.  “The Art Of Shredding”

Disc Two – Ultimate, Deluxe, and Expanded Editions
(Tracks 1-7 Recorded Live at Foundations Forum, Los Angeles, CA 9/15/90)
(Tracks 8-12 Recorded at For Those About to Rock: Monsters in Moscow, 1991)
1.    “Domination” – Live*
2.    “Psycho Holiday” – Live*
3.    “The Art Of Shredding” – Live*
4.    “Cowboys From Hell” – Live*
5.    “Cemetery Gates” – Live*
6.    “Primal Concrete Sledge” – Live*
7.    “Heresy” – Live*
8.    “Domination” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
9.    “Primal Concrete Sledge” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
10.  “Cowboys From Hell” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
11.  “Heresy” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
12.  “Psycho Holiday” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†

Disc Three – Ultimate and Deluxe Editions Only
1.    “The Will To Survive”*
2.    “Shattered” – Demo*
3.    “Cowboys From Hell” – Demo*
4.    “Heresy” – Demo*
5.    “Cemetery Gates” – Demo*
6.    “Psycho Holiday” – Demo*
7.    “Medicine Man” – Demo*
8.    “Message In Blood” – Demo*
9.    “Domination” – Demo*
10.  “The Sleep” – Demo*
11.  “The Art Of Shredding” – Demo*

* Previously Unreleased
† Unreleased in the U.S
(COWBOYS FROM HELL originally released on July 24, 1990)

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Pantera Rides Again On 20th Anniversary ‘Cowboys From Hell’ 3 Disc Ultimate Edition!

Pantera Rides Again On 20th Anniversary ‘Cowboys From Hell’ 3 Disc Ultimate Edition!

PANTERA found its growl and groove on COWBOYS FROM HELL, a landmark album whose bone-powdering intensity, razor-sharp riffing and pummeling rhythmic assault represented a turning point in modern metal when it was released in 1990. More than just PANTERA’s major label debut, many consider this album to be the official debut of the PANTERA lineup with singer Philip Anselmo, guitarist “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott, his brother, drummer Vinnie Paul and bassist Rex Brown.

To celebrate the 20-year anniversary of COWBOYS FROM HELL, Rhino rounds up a three-disc Ultimate Edition, a three-disc Deluxe Edition, and a two-disc Expanded Edition. All three editions include a newly remastered version of the original album along with unreleased and rare live performances from the “Cowboys From Hell” Tour.

The Ultimate and Deluxe Editions will also feature a disc of unreleased demos for nearly every album track, plus, “The Will To Survive,” a previously unreleased song recorded during the album’s sessions.

“’The Will To Survive’ is a great track. With so many killer songs, it was hard to pick and choose the ones that should make our major label debut,” says Paul. “After hearing it for the first time in about 20 years, its a pretty stellar performance and I am definitely proud that it will see the light of day for all the die hard PANTERA fans around the world! It shows the true musical diversity of the band at that time!”

The Deluxe and Expanded Editions of COWBOYS FROM HELL will be released September 14 at all retail outlets, including www.pantera.com and www.rhino.com. The Deluxe Edition will be available for a suggested list price of $29.98 (physical) and $17.99 (digital) and the Expanded Edition for $19.98 (physical) and $12.99 (digital).

The Ultimate Edition will feature all three discs included in the Deluxe Edition and will be housed in an intricate box including several replica memorabilia pieces from the Cowboys era. The Ultimate Edition will be available on November 23 and final pre-order details, as well as the contents, will be unveiled soon on PANTERA’s Facebook page <http://www.facebook.com/Pantera>.

Pantera... in simpler times.

Along with the remastered version of COWBOYS FROM HELL, all three sets include a disc of live music recorded during the tour for the album. It begins with seven unreleased performances from PANTERA’s September 15, 1990 appearance at the Foundations Forum metal convention in California, a show recorded for radio broadcast but never released commercially. The remainder of the disc contains the five-song EP Alive And Hostile, a collection of performances recorded in 1991 at the Monsters of Rock festival in Moscow that was previously available only in Australia as part of a 1994 boxed set.

The Ultimate and Deluxe Editions of COWBOYS FROM HELL include a third disc that contains the previously unreleased “The Will To Survive,” along with demos for 10 of the album’s 12 songs, including early versions of the title track, “Psycho Holiday,” “The Art Of Shredding” and “Cemetery Gates.”

After being turned down “twenty-eight times by every major label on the face of the earth,” ATCO Records A&R rep Mark Ross saw the band when Hurricane Hugo stranded him in Texas. The rest, as they say, is history, including another seven years and over a million miles of touring for COWBOYS to be certified Platinum (one million album sales) by the RIAA.

The album’s liner notes include essays by each of the band’s surviving members, producer Terry Date, and the aforementioned Ross. Recalling the first time he saw Pantera, Ross writes, “By the end of the first song, my jaw was on the floor. The sonic power of it all—the attitude and the musicianship—blew me away. Basically, you had to be an idiot to not think they’re amazing. I mean, how could you see these guys and not think, Holy shit!?
PANTERA
COWBOYS FROM HELL
Disc One – Ultimate, Deluxe, and Expanded Editions
1.    “Cowboys From Hell”
2.    “Primal Concrete Sledge”
3.    “Psycho Holiday”
4.    “Heresy”
5.    “Cemetery Gates”
6.    “Domination”
7.    “Shattered”
8.    “Clash With Reality”
9.    “Medicine Man”
10.  “Message In Blood”
11.  “The Sleep”
12.  “The Art Of Shredding”

Disc Two – Ultimate, Deluxe, and Expanded Editions
(Tracks 1-7 Recorded Live at Foundations Forum, Los Angeles, CA 9/15/90)
(Tracks 8-12 Recorded at For Those About to Rock: Monsters in Moscow, 1991)
1.    “Domination” – Live*
2.    “Psycho Holiday” – Live*
3.    “The Art Of Shredding” – Live*
4.    “Cowboys From Hell” – Live*
5.    “Cemetery Gates” – Live*
6.    “Primal Concrete Sledge” – Live*
7.    “Heresy” – Live*
8.    “Domination” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
9.    “Primal Concrete Sledge” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
10.  “Cowboys From Hell” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
11.  “Heresy” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†
12.  “Psycho Holiday” – Live, Alive And Hostile EP†

Disc Three – Ultimate and Deluxe Editions Only
1.    “The Will To Survive”*
2.    “Shattered” – Demo*
3.    “Cowboys From Hell” – Demo*
4.    “Heresy” – Demo*
5.    “Cemetery Gates” – Demo*
6.    “Psycho Holiday” – Demo*
7.    “Medicine Man” – Demo*
8.    “Message In Blood” – Demo*
9.    “Domination” – Demo*
10.  “The Sleep” – Demo*
11.  “The Art Of Shredding” – Demo*

* Previously Unreleased
† Unreleased in the U.S
(COWBOYS FROM HELL originally released on July 24, 1990)

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Jesse Dayton Talks Captain Clegg And The Night Creatures!

Jesse Dayton Talks Captain Clegg And The Night Creatures!

feature-capt-clegg

Often described as “the best kept secret in modern country music,” Jesse Dayton has achieved a level of success that most people can only dream about. Armed with an eclectic musical background and collaborations with artists such as Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, and The Supersuckers, Jesse has truly made a name for himself in the music industry. The Austin, Texas-based guitar slinger has also found further musical success in the film and television industries. Directors and producers have been knocking on Jesse’s door for years, asking him to be a part their projects. Rob Zombie took notice of Dayton’s talent and recruited him for two of his films. Jesse is responsible for creating the music of Banjo & Sullivan in The Devil’s Rejects and most recently took on the role of bringing Captain Clegg to life in Rob Zombie’s Halloween II. Humbled by his success, Jesse believes that his career is the result of proper timing, a little bit of luck, and the support he has received from his cult following of fans. Steve Johnson of Icon vs Icon catches up with Jesse to discuss his long career, the current state of country music, the creation of Captain Clegg & The Night Creatures, his upcoming tour with Rob Zombie, and the fact he may be booked up solid for the rest of his life during the month of October! Are you phantom jammers ready to begin? Yes? Well then, I give you Jesse Dayton!

jesse_dayton-1Where did you grow up?

I was born down in Beaumont, Texas. On the Texas, Louisiana border. A big Cajun music kind of scene down there. It was a great place to grow up. I have been coming to Austin all my life. So I live in Austin, Texas. That’s where I live because there’s such a burgeoning music scene. It’s kind of a liberal hub of the south, if you will.

How did music first come into your life?

Man, all kinds of stuff happened. My parents are big music fans. My whole family went to the University of Texas. They used to take me to these incredible concerts in Austin when I was a kid. It was very much like San Francisco was. We’d go to The Armadillo Palace when I was a little kid and see Willie, Waylon, Miles Davis, and Frank Zappa all on the same bill. I grew up on big doses of honky tonk music, Cajun music, and rhythm and blues. Stuff like that. Then when I got older, of course I got introduced to punk rock. I just had to immediately start rebelling against the family. [laughs]

How did you get your start in the music industry?

Man, I did all kinds of stuff. I got a record deal when I was pretty young. One thing that really helped me tremendously was a fluke. I was in Nashville and I was doing this TV interview that Kris Kristofferson was on. Waylon Jennings and his wife Jessi Colter were watching the show that I was on because they were watching for Kris. They were good friends with Kristofferson. They saw me on there and while they were watching the show, Waylon cut his finger in the kitchen while he was cooking. The next morning as I was leaving my hotel, I got a phone call saying Waylon Jennings saw me on the television show, would I come down and play guitar for him. So I started playing guitar for Waylon Jennings. That led to a whole bunch of stuff. The day that I got to the studio, Johnny Cash opened the door to the studio. He hung out with us all day, so I played with him. I played with Waylon. I got a job playing with Ray Price. I played on some Willie stuff. It just kind of snowballed after that. I was this young kid who played guitar, who was from Texas. I just got introduced to everybody in a real cool way.

Your music has been described as everything from honky tonk and rockabilly, to Americana and speed-country. For people who aren’t familiar with your music, what would you classify yourself as?

Aw man, I hate to classify. It’s really hard for me and always has been for me to put a label on it. It’s so many things from American music and I just kind of make them into hybrids. It’s just got a lot of different stuff. Honky tonk, blues, punk, psychobilly, and all kinds of stuff.

jd1You are often referred to as “the best kept secret in modern country music.” What are your thoughts on that statement?

Well it’s kind of interesting. I never really tried to appeal to the mainstream country radio people. I think because of that, that’s where I kind of got that response. A lot of those people end up liking me after they hear me. To lump me in with whoever is on modern country radio would be a huge mistake. My music is just way more gritty and more hardcore. It kind of freaks me out when people call me country because people immediately think of who’s on country music today. I think modern country music today sucks. It’s Nashville factory. Real safe, middle of the road, pop music that has very, very little to do with country music.

What do you attribute the longevity of your career to?

Man I don’t know. I somehow built a cult following of fans and I really attribute my career to them. I could somehow go on tour and play and people show up. I’ve never had to do anything super mainstream. I think a lot of it is just me going out and playing for all of those years and building up that cult following. It was always something that no record company or radio station could ever take away from me.

Being in the music industry as long as you have, are there still surprises?

Yeah. The music business is about the most cutthroat business I can think of. The thing that surprises me is the lowest depths of misery that these labels will go to prefab some artist and put them out there, and then people buy it. That is what surprises me.

What do you consider the defining moment of your career so far?

Man, I don’t know. I’ve had a lot of good things happen to me. When I made records with all of these legendary outlaw country guys, I think those will probably go down in history. Somebody will probably pick up that Jesse Dayton played guitar on that. That was a big deal. There’s been all kinds of deals. I played at the inaugural ball. I met the president. I don’t know… There’s been so many great things that have happened. Somehow people in the film industry have really taken to me. That has always given me kind of a leg up. I’ve had a lot of songs in a lot of films, TV shows, and stuff like that. One thing that happened with me is that I was one of the first artists seven or eight years ago to go to a major label and ask to be let off the label so I could start my own record label. They all thought I was crazy. Of course the house of cards totally fell and the record business went under. It helped me pin point who my audience was and who I wanted to play for. I think the defining thing of me and my career is probably when I took a hold of my career and started doing what I wanted, instead of doing what labels wanted me to do.

If someone were to go out and pick up just one of your albums, which one would you recommend and why?

‘The Country Soul Brother’ record is probably a pretty good starter kit. It’s got all of the stuff in it that I think appeals to different fans. We have a lot of rock n’ roll fans, in the same way that Waylon sold to a lot of rock n’ roll fans. We have such an edge to our music. ‘The Country Soul Brother’ record has that edge throughout the whole thing. It’s got some real aggressive guitar playing. I appeal to a lot of different people for different reasons. There are some people that come out just to listen to my guitar playing because they are guitar freaks. There are some people that come out who just want to hear that outlaw, crazy country, something different than what they hear on the radio. Then there’s the girls. [laughs]

You recently released a Captain Clegg and the Night Creatures album. How did that come about?

captcleggcdIt was such a cool deal. I had done the Banjo & Sullivan record for ‘The Devil’s Rejects’ movie. It came about in a real wild way. Rob called me and said, “Hey, we’re making this crazy white trash horror movie called ‘The Devil’s Rejects’. We think your music would be perfect. Would you be interested in doing this fake CD for Banjo & Sullivan?” I was like, “Yeah! Sure!” So I flew out to L.A. and I wrote a bunch of songs. I took them to Rob. I went into his office, it was the first time I ever met him. He died laughing listening to all of the lyrics. He just thought it was really cool, so we put out that record. The record did pretty good. Then he calls me when I am playing with Social Distortion in a theater in Hollywood. He calls me and he’s like, “Are you in L.A. right now?” I’m like, “Yeah.” He goes, “Me and Sheri are going to come down.” I was like, “OK!” It was kind of a big deal. The show I was playing with Social Distortion was real cool. Everybody was kind of freaking out because Rob and Sheri were coming backstage. Rob and Sheri come backstage and we hang out for a while. He’s like, “Hey man, I’m doing this new movie and I think I want to put you in it.” I was like, “Great!” I was like, “Sign me up man!” He watches the show and when he saw that show, that must have been where he got the idea to do the Phantom Jam scene. It was a really cool show that night. We had tons of people there just freaking out and singing along to our stuff. It was a very edgy, kind of punk rock crowd. Anyway, he called me later and said, “Hey. I want you and your band to be in the movie. I want you to play this new character. The movie is going to be ‘Halloween II’.” I was like, “Holy shit!” I was like, “Right on man!” Immediately we started to email each other song ideas back and forth. Rob was very much the person who came up with all of this. He came up with the idea for the name of the band, which he took from an old English horror movie. We started talking about hybrid music ideas. What would it be like if Buck Owens did an Iggy Pop song? What would it be if we mixed The Misfits with The Cramps? There were all of these different ideas. I just wrote all of these ideas down and I got in the car and drove to New Orleans. I checked into this haunted hotel called the Lamothe House on Esplanade Avenue and I wrote all of these songs in like two days.

What has it been like working with Rob?

Rob is the greatest. He’s a sweetheart. He’s a real nice guy and he’s very much all about ideas and art. Things don’t really turn him on. What turns him on is ideas and art. You talk about somebody who’s got some integrity. When it comes to his vision, he won’t back down for anything. Working with him… He creates a really nice vibe on the set. We did two days that were over fifteen hours long when we filmed the Phantom Jam. We went and filmed other stuff besides that that didn’t make it in the movie, which will probably make it on the DVD. The two days we did the Phantom Jam, we’re out in the middle of Georgia in this super hot barn. He’s got it all decorated like it’s a club that’s in hell. It just looks unbelievable. There was me and like four hundred extras and the crew. I didn’t hear anyone bitch the whole time. That’s just unbelievable. That’s just unbelievable man! I mean we’re in there sweating our asses off dude. It is like one hundred and five degrees in the place. We’re all made up, perfectly coiffed, with these incredible costumes on. The vibe that Rob creates on the set, it’s like no one wants to let him down. He’s just a good dude. No one bitched the whole time. I thought about that afterward and I was like, “Wow! That’s unbelievable!”

CaptainClegg_Poster_ShermanAre there any noticeable differences between Rob Zombie the musician and Rob Zombie the director?

You know, I don’t really see any differences. I think for him, it’s probably all just art. Rob’s a multi-level kind of guy. He does art and shit that’s incredible. He whipped out the artwork for the Banjo & Sullivan record himself, like it was nothing. I don’t think he sees a difference between making music, directing, drawing, and producing. The guy is a multi-talented guy and he just tries to go for what’s honest. That usually ends up being very cool. You know what I mean?

Definitely! I enjoy his movies a lot. I definitely liked this new one even though the so-called critics panned the hell out of it.

The thing is, it’s real easy to beat up on a horror movie guy. Let’s face it man, Rob’s movies are really about escapism. Rob doesn’t just make movies, he makes whole worlds. No director goes to the plane of being that elaborate to where you make your own fake TV commercials, fake TV shows, and you invent fans. Directors don’t think like that. The difference between Rob and most directors is that most directors are usually super geeky film guys, where as Rob Zombie is a cool guy that chicks are crazy about! [laughs] When people pan his movie, I think there’s got to be some kind of jealousy in there for that guy. He’s an animal man. He’s non-stop, constantly inventing and doing shit. I think people who pan his movies are just kind of jealous of him.

Did you have any input into the look of Captain Clegg and the rest of the band or did Rob have that laid out for you?

We talked about it. He had the idea. I was like, “Yeah, that’s cool man!” When we first came out with pictures of the band, a lot his crowd said, “You look like The Ghastly Ones.” Rob was like, “No! They look like The Damned!” Rob was like, “That’s where they got that look dude, The Damned. OK!” If anybody took the look from anybody, it was from The Damned. He just wanted something that was totally creepy and kind of like grave digger. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the background bio that he wrote for Captain Clegg and the Night Creatures. Rob Zombie actually sat down and wrote that shit out man. That’s just crazy. We’re four grave diggers from Sherman, Texas who decided to start a band. It’s crazy. I read it and I just busted out laughing. Everybody in his movie has these incredible back stories.

I do enjoy the fact that he takes these characters and gives them these huge back stories that you’ve never had before, especially in this new ‘Halloween.’

It’s cool. It helps actors. It helps people realize who they are. It gives you a sense of what he wants. There’s nothing worse than working with somebody who doesn’t know what they want.

l_ef462761123a4e57bfc261af17239b50Whose idea was it to come up with a full album of material and release it separate from the film’s soundtrack?

It was Rob’s idea. We didn’t know how we were going to do it. We didn’t know if we were going to get a big label to put it out. Universal put out Banjo & Sullivan. Rob was like, “How are you doing on your own label?” I said, “Man, my label is doing great!” He goes, “Why don’t we resurrect my label Zombie A Go-Go.” I didn’t know the name of it until after I wrote the song by the way. It was totally a fluke. So we made a deal. Rob let me put it out on my own label imprint with his label, which shows you how cool he is. He didn’t have to do that. He really gave me a piece of the album. If the record goes good, I’ll do really well. The record has been doing really well.

I actually downloaded it last week off of iTunes.

They’re playing it a lot on satellite radio. The buzz is spreading. Every day I jump on my Facebook or MySpace and somebody talks about how they just heard it on the radio.

Were there any challenges to making the music/album?

Yeah, there were. Like I said, it’s only difficult doing stuff like that when you don’t really know what your director wants. Rob gave me all these ideas. He would text message me. We made the video for Zombie A Go Go. Rob would text message me back, “Just saw some of the footage from the video. Needs more blood and gore! Ha Ha Ha!” Then he’d text message me later and he’d go, “What do you think about a bouncing skull, like a bouncing ball following the bouncing skull for the chorus?” Just hilarious stuff. I just made it happen man. I called some friends of mine here that are in the Austin film scene and said, “Hey! Rob Zombie wants a bouncing skull. Can you animate that for me?” It was just all fun man. The thing that you can see with Rob and his fans too, is that little inner kid inside of you gets to come out and really get mischievous and really have a good time. We’re hoping the record does that. The big news that we got and I can’t release any dates, is that Captain Clegg is going on tour with Rob Zombie. It’s going to be amazing bro. We are going to go out as Captain Clegg and the Night Creatures and play these big huge places every night and open up for him. It’s going to be amazing.

Speaking of your tour, are you going to have the go-go dancers up there with you?

I am! I’m bringing the go-go dancers with me. I’m bringing a pedal steel guitar player and The Night Creatures, the three guys backing me up. We’re doing all kinds of crazy shit. Since we only have one record of material, in the middle of certain songs we put in other people’s songs. In the middle of ‘Creeps For Cushing’ we bust into ‘War Pigs’ by Black Sabbath. Then on another song, in the middle of ‘Zombie A Go Go’ we break into ‘Hybrid Moments’ by The Misfits. It’s just a fun set. It’s like a whirlwind set. I’m excited.

DSC_0168You mentioned the ‘Zombie A Go Go’ video. Can we expect anymore videos from Captain Clegg?

I don’t know if you knew this, but before we did the Phantom Jam scene Rob flew us to Florida and we made videos for every song on the record in a civil war graveyard. Rob is telling me that he is going to have all of this footage of Clegg and the Night Creatures on the DVD. We’re talking about actually doing a Clegg and the Night Creatures Psychobilly EP for Christmas. Like the most fucked up Christmas album you’ve ever heard in your life. I think the world could use one right now. Really, just totally unchristian Christmas record.

Do you think you will have time to breathe for the rest of your life during the month of October?

Oh man! I know we’re playing with Rob on Halloween night. As soon as the movie came out the Halloween offers started pouring in. I hope I don’t man. I hope I am swamped every year in October with Captain Clegg stuff. The cool thing about the Clegg music and the record is that it’s such a party record. It is a record to just get down and dirty and drink and party. That’s what kind of record it is. I think we’re going to be pretty much booked on Halloween for the rest of my life bro. [laughs]

What do you hope that people come away with after listening to your music or seeing your live performance?

My favorite thing that happens is when people come up and they go, “You know I’m not really into country or rockabilly, but I like this guy because he was edgy and different and he put on a good show.” That’s the highest compliment I could ever get from anybody. Like somebody who wouldn’t necessarily be into that music, but saw us and just converted.

music_feature-11440_wolfson_Ever had a “Spinal Tap Moment” on stage?

Oh yeah man! One time I was playing in Hollywood and I fell off the stage and I fell into a box that held a bunch of microphones and it got stuck perfectly on my ass. When I stood up I had this box on my ass. Quentin Tarantino and Warren G were in the crowd in the front row. A musician named Dave Alvin actually pulled the box off of my ass. It was one of those devastating moments. I was like, “Oh well! I can’t do anything about it! I guess I’ll have a shot and keep rocking out!” Dude when you play thousands of shows, when you play two hundred shows a year, there’s going to be shit that goes wrong. It’s all in good fun man.

Other than the tour with Rob, what’s next for you and your band?

I’ve got some more stuff coming out in Rob’s animated movie. Supposedly they animated me as Adam Banjo and I get to sing ‘Dick Soup’ in the movie. What we’re talking about doing is a Captain Clegg versus the Zombies grind-house b-movie in New Orleans. This will be a thing that me and a buddy of mine, who is a film guy here in Austin, are working on. I’m going to have another Jesse Dayton record coming out at some point. Right now I just need to focus on getting ready for this tour because it’s going to be a humongous tour.

Do you have an advice for anyone who would like to get involved in the music industry?

Yeah man! The best advice for people getting involved in the music industry is to just treat it like you treat anything else. Just be honest with yourself. If you work and you play a ton of gigs, all this other success stuff will come. I’ll tell you one thing, being in the music business, you’ve got to be a lifer. It ain’t for the weak of heart.

captclegg-roadsterThat’s good advice. That’s basically what I have been hearing from everyone that I have interviewed. You’ve got to go balls out or go home!

Yeah! Same thing with acting or anything. One of my best friends in the world is Lew Temple. He was the guy that puked on the bed in ‘The Devil’s Rejects’ and he was the guard that raped the girl in the last ‘Halloween’. Lew calls me the other day and goes, “Man, you’ll never guess what happened.” I said, “What?” He said, “I met Tony Scott. I just got cast in a big character actor part opposite Denzel Washington in the new Tony Scott thriller.” I was like, “Wow!” Lew’s been at it in acting as long as I have been at it in music. He just never gave up man. Now he finally got this big, huge part in this movie. It just pays off man.

Is there anything else you want to add or let your fans know?

Be sure to visit www.captainclegg.com. You can go on iTunes and get the record now. The record will be in stores any day now. It can be found at most of the independent music stores and Hot Topic.

Thanks for your time and best of luck!

You got it man! Thanks a lot!

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For all the latest information on Captain Clegg And The Night Creatures, be sure to swing on by the official site at www.captainclegg.com!

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Hank Williams III: Crazed County (and Metal) Rebel

Hank Williams III: Crazed County (and Metal) Rebel

hank3smokingYou?d be hard pressed to find a more diverse musician than Hank Williams III. In addition to being one of the few today carrying the torch for his grandfather and the other great country outlaws, he played bass in former Pantera vocalist Phil Anselmo?s hardcore/metal band Superjoint Ritual. His other band, Assjack, which splits the bill with his country act when he?s on tour, nicely fits into the same genre. And he has even more on his plate, including a new project with Anselmo, as he told Jason Price of Live-Metal.net in a recent interview.

Live-Metal: You just released a new record entitled Straight to Hell. The approach to this release is very “do it yourself.” What can you tell us about the process you used on the record?

Hank III: Well, just trying to set an example to a lot of bands really, that you don’t have to spend $200,000 on a record and be in debt to your label forever. In general, any band should have a little recording tool like that or songwriters should have one, ?cause they?re really easy to use, man. I used them with us to Superjoint Ritual and on all kinds of crazy intense, loud music, and they capture a pretty good sound. They are pretty easy to run, you don’t have to ? it’s not like running Protools or anything like that. So that was the main thing. The band creating our own sound kinda, a little bit, ya know… it took it to another level on just the air quality really.

Straight to Hell is a two-disc album with distinctly different sounds. Do you consider it two separate albums?

Well the first one is done right. It’s got all the superpickers on it and all that stuff. The second one is just my way of having fun. A bunch of ambient noise, more stripped down versions of songs, just me and my guitar, recorded on a tape deck. So it’s not as many tricks as on the other one. It is just more straight-up “real.”

The album was delayed numerous times before it was released. How long go did you actually record it?

Yeah. It was recorded about five, six months before it came out, but that just goes back to “the machine” and Wal-Mart and corporate bullshit.

Originally you were set to release an album called Thrown Out of Every Bar on Curb Records.

Yeah, I just changed the title. That’s all. It all struck me that Straight to Hell would be more fitting with the way the year is. The year of the devil and all that shit lining up, so that was the main reason for switching it.

Your music seems to be evolving with each release that you put out. How do you see you music changing with your future releases?

I think it is more of a step in a direction that captures what we are. I mean, as far as us being a little rough around the edges, ya know. This record definitely captures that a lot more then the earlier ones ?cause ? I don’t know ? ?cause we weren’t able to be ourselves as much. The kind of crowd we attract, I mean some of them are straight-up Americans, but a lot of them are the kids in black and the hellraisers and partiers and all that stuff, the more rebel kind of crowd.

Do you get a lot of pressure to tone down anything that you record from your label?

No, not anymore. They know I have been in the courtroom for the last four and a half years with them for a reason, and that is the key. Respect us for what we are, ya know. Everybody else can fit in the mold. There’s 125 bands that can fit in the mold around here, so it’s OK for one of them to go against the grain and then for them to halfway respect us, man … So … Getting there.

You have a song on Straight to Hell entitled “Country Heroes.” Can you tell us a little bit about that?

It’s for a lot of the kids that come out to the shows that don’t even listen to country music, and it’s just kind of a name dropping song to let them know, “Here are some guys that you can maybe get into,” ya know. Some of them have some dark topics … That is for the younger ones. For the older fans, that kind of song is for the kind of guy that is dealing with his problems. That’s his psychiatrist is the music, man. That is just what it is, man, just talking about getting away a little bit. Getting wasted with ’em and getting through hard times. That is pretty much it, man.

With that said, who are some of your rock or metal heroes?

Hank III: Well as far as slowness goes, it was definitely Buzz Osborne from The Melvins. Matt Pike from Sleep and High On Fire. Then it, uhhhh, shoot, I mean I had so many, man, ya know. I got to see Pantera, fuckin’ almost like 9 times in a 500-seat club in ?90-?93, never saw them in the amphitheater, man, so those guys always hit pretty hard. Just tons, man … I just had so much, from Black Flag to Cro-Mags to noise music like MELT-BANANA and stuff. Just all kinds. It?s hard for me to hone in on one.

When you first started playing music, which came to you first, the country side or the rock side?

Drums. I got my first drumset when I was 10 years old and listened to Black Sabbath, KISS and ZZ Top records to go along with it. So that created my love for the heavy stuff. And everything kept getting heavier and darker, and I kept going more with it. So it was definitely the harder stuff first and still to this day, ya know. Got in to the country when I was probably, I guess, 21 or 22 maybe playing some shows here and there.

How did you first get together with the band you are currently with now? Are these guys you have know for a while or grew up with?

No man, my band always comes and goes. It’s not like this band is called The Melvins. This band is called Hank Three and Assjack or whatever. So my players come and go, man. For the ones that stick with us for a little bit, much respect to ’em and that’s just the way it is. Most of them are from out of state and they hang in there until they’re sick of it and it’s time to move on. That’s pretty much it.

Is it hard to find musicians that are willing to play both styles of music together? Do they seek you out?

Yeah. They kinda seek me out but it goes back to just holdings the ads and nowadays, I at least got a bit more of a grip on it. You know if people want to … Thank God for Myspace is all I can say. You know a lot of different musicians have hit me up on there, ya know, whenever the time is needed. So I definitely have a good list to pick from now.

When you first started doing your “Jekyll and Hyde” style show, what type of reaction did you get? Was it a surprise to you?

Not a surprise to me. It just depends what kind of club we were playing really, man. You know, if we were playing a boot scoot bar in fuckin’ Texas, more than likely there is going to be a little bit of a problem before the nights over. And that was back before we were getting the respect of the rock clubs, and then we finally got the respect of the rock clubs and everything was OK to a point. Ya know, fights are more common in rock clubs and they know how to deal with it better. Opposed to a bunch of rednecks that don’t know what the fuck is going on, you know, trying to control people, I guess. So it has definitely gotten better over the years and it is not as much of a surprise as it used to be. So nowadays it is kind of expected.

What are some of your favorite songs to play live?

Ah man, um, right now one called “Black Destiny” in the Assjack set. It depends if I have a country voice or not really on that particular day. Maybe “Smoke and Wine,” “Dick in Dixie,” some of the more upbeat songs, ya know, but every night it?s different. It kinda depends.

You have always had a good relationship with bootleggers documenting your shows.

Yeah.

You have even released some bootlegs of your own in the past. Do you have any plans on releasing any official bootlegs?

Yeah, once my time is done with Curb, I will definitely have quite the bootleg set coming out. So, it?s gonna go even back to when I was 11 years old. It’s gonna be cool, man, It’s going to be different. It’s gonna be very hands on, very “D-I-Y.”

What do you have planned next as far as releases?

I think Assjack will be the next record that is gonna come out, so we can finally get a rock record out there. Then another country album. That is the way it is set up in the business.

What is going on with Superjoint Ritual?

Superjoint is in the grave right now, because someone tried bossing the boss and you NEVER boss the boss. Now he had to learn the hard way so Philip has laid that band to rest. It might come back. I seriously doubt it. But in the meantime Down is working on their new record and getting ready to be touring here soon. I’ve got another side project with Philip. I?m playing drums and Philip’s is playing guitar. Mike Williams from Eyehategod is screamin’ and it’s called Arson Anthem. So far we’ve got eight songs of it recorded. So we?re still having fun and making music, just getting in there and jammin’, man.

In the past you have talked about the fact that you cannot hear true “country” on the radio anymore, so what are you thoughts on “rock radio” in general?

Man, I am so ? I don’t listen to radio anymore, man. If I do, it?s Internet radio. That?s all I can say, Internet radio, the Sirius and the XMs are making a difference. They?re playing the old and they?re paying the new. Format radio is still shabby. It?s still basically pay for play formatted and they?re not mixin’ it up. Maybe a few stations are, but the majority of them are kinda the same old same old. But, like I said, you?re talking to somebody who has given up on that a long time ago. If I do listen to anything, it’s on the Internet.

Is there anything that you are currently listening to that fans of yours might be into?

Man, here lately I have been listening to a lot of the old Wicked Angel, Bedemon, Pentagram, a lot of Jimmy Martin, that’s bluegrass. On the harder stuff, there?s a band called CSA, that’s Confederate States of America. It’s kinda like Down but it’s not. A lot of what I like is from these young kids man. Every show I do I get local bands giving me their CDs, a lot of them are pretty damn good. There is a band out of Lincoln, Nebraska called The Saints, that I am freakin’ out over. Those Poor Bastards out of Madison, Wisconsin, its like “goth country,” hasn’t really been done yet.

You do a cover of one of their (Those Poor Bastards) songs on your album, don’t you?

Yes. Yes I do. I met that kid after a Superjoint show. He just walked up to me and said, ?Hey man, here’s something I do. You might like it, you might hate it, however.” And next thing I knew it had been a year and a half and that thing, you know, was all I was listening to. So they definitely hit me pretty hard, man. They have quite the future ahead of them, I am sure, or I hope. So, it’s just unknown territory, so I guess that?s why it strikes me so hard.

Anything that you would like to say to your fans?

Just check us out. We’ll be out there doing our Jekyll and Hyde, our country, a little bit of hellbilly and the Assjack for a while and we’ll be seeing ya on the road, man. Check our dates at Hank3.com or Pollstar.com. We’ll be out there for hopefully another 25 years.

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