Tag Archive | "Heart"

Heart To Release New Album, ‘Beautiful Broken,’ On July 8th!

Heart To Release New Album, ‘Beautiful Broken,’ On July 8th!

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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame members HEART return July 8 with BEAUTIFUL BROKEN, their sixteenth album and their first on Concord Records. HEART has sold over 35 million records, and this anticipated album is their first in four years. BEAUTIFUL BROKEN finds Ann and Nancy Wilson exploring new songs, but taking some of their favorite “cherry picks” from their catalog and rerecording and rethinking them. The title track and first single features a dynamic guest vocal contribution by Metallica’s James Hetfield with Ann Wilson. Click here to watch an album preview clip.

“There is really a seventies feel to this record both in the sound, and the way we got to the emotional core of each song,” says Nancy Wilson. “We picked songs that we always wanted to re-do, plus we’ve added three new tracks. On both new and old, we have the band playing together the way we used to. This is classic Heart.”

The seven tracks that were pulled from the HEART catalog were tunes both Nancy and Ann wanted another shot at, due many times to how they were initially produced. Songs like “City’s Burning,” “Down on Me,” and “Sweet Darlin'” have always been live favorites of the sisters, and of HEART’s fan base, but they had somewhat languished. “Those songs may have fallen through the cracks, in a way, because of where radio was at the time when they were first released,” Ann Wilson says. “Rediscovering those songs, I found ways they emotionally still speak to me.” Two songs are from Passionworks, two from Private Audition, and two are from Bebe Le Strange.

BEAUTIFUL BROKEN’s title track had been a bonus song off Fanatic, HEART’s last album, but this version is essentially an entirely new song with barnburner vocals-and even some lyrics-added by Metallica’s James Hetfield. “It blows the previous version out of the water,” says Nancy. “James just took the song on, and what he added was perfect with a bite and a rock accent.”

BEAUTIFUL BROKEN was co-produced by Nancy Wilson with Heart’s bassist Dan Rothchild. Rothchild had previously produced Better Than Ezra’s platinum-selling Deluxe, but he also comes from rock royalty: his father was legendary Doors producer Paul Rothchild. BEAUTIFUL BROKEN was recorded at Sunset Sound in Los Angeles, the same studio the Doors cut their best work. “There were eerie echoes in the hallway,” Nancy says.

Rothchild said his goal was to capture the human feel of HEART live in the studio. “On these classics, some of which had suffered from eighties-era over-editing-production-curse, we stripped the paint off and found the beauty underneath,” he says.

For Ann, the album allowed her to revisit, and re-sing, songs she felt “never reached their full development.” For Nancy, the lyrical heart came alive: “I felt these songs were poetic pieces that were lost in translation with the sounds of the eighties, which was harder and more digital. We wanted to drape them in velvet, and make them shine.”

One example of is “City’s Burning,” originally on the 1982 album Private Audition. “The first time we recorded that was in 1981,” says Ann, “and it was in a key that was a bit ‘show-offy,’ and sped-up. On BEAUTIFUL BROKEN, we put the key in the right place, and the song really bore fruit.”

Nancy Wilson sings one of three new songs, “Two. The song had a different genesis than many HEART classics, as Wilson first heard it on a demo made for a television show her husband Geoff was working on. She reached out to the song’s writer–R&B sensation Ne-Yo–and asked if he’d consider giving her the song. “I went to work begging for the song,” she says. “Ne-Yo said, ‘sure.’ It ends up he’s a Heart fan. He may still release his own version at some point, but to me the song feels like mine now.”

One of the unique aspects to BEAUTIFUL BROKEN is the string arrangements on four songs done by legendary arranger Paul Buckmaster. Buckmaster’s resume includes work with the Rolling Stones and Elton John (“Levon”). “We were talking about how we wanted ‘Paul Buckmaster-type’ strings at one point,” Nancy said. “So then we decided to call Paul himself.”

Buckmaster’s work on “Sweet Darlin'” is, in particular, a standout, but only because the strings highlight Ann’s powerful vocals. Ann had always wanted another shot at “Sweet Darlin'” so it was an ideal choice for BEAUTIFUL BROKEN. “To me the original sounded somehow incomplete,” Ann says. This version, with Buckmaster’s strings, finishes the song properly, but it also showcases how Ann’s voice has remained strong over the decades.

Ann and Nancy Wilson formed HEART when the idea of two women leading a rock band was still groundbreaking. From the moment 1976’s Dreamboat Annie was released, they became stars. With hits like “Magic Man,” “Crazy On You,” “Barracuda,” “Alone,” “What About Love,” and “These Dreams,” the band became one of the biggest hit-makers in the seventies and eighties. In 2012, their memoir Kicking & Dreaming: A Story of Heart, Soul and Rock & Roll. became a New York Times bestseller, and in 2013 they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. They have sold more records than any sister act in the history of popular music, but they’ve done so keeping their vision–that women can both rock and put forth emotional intimacy–central to their sound.

BEAUTIFUL BROKEN follows in that tradition, an album with pure rock power on the title track, but also tender sexual yearning on “Language of Love.” It’s a contrast that has always been the essence of HEART. “We still make records like we always have, and they are always impossibly romantic, because Ann is always an impossibly romantic singer,” Nancy says. “In a world where there is less poetic lyric writing, we’ve always tried to plant a flag for poetry.”

That may seem “broken” in a way, in a world of machine-created pop music, but it is also certainly a beautiful vision. This year HEART will bring that vision to half a million fans during their summer concert tour, and BEAUTIFUL BROKEN extends that relationship with radio-ready songs, and deep album cuts.

Click here to pre-order the album.

The dates for HEART’s headlining summer tour with Joan Jett & the Blackhearts and Cheap Trick are here: www.heart-music.com/tour

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Cheap Trick To Release ‘Bang Zoom Crazy…Hello’ On April 1st,

Cheap Trick To Release ‘Bang Zoom Crazy…Hello’ On April 1st,

cheap-trick-no-directionhome-2016

Legendary power-pop collective Cheap Trick set a new course with “No Direction Home,” from their upcoming album Bang Zoom Crazy…Hello, due out April 1, their first on Big Machine Records. Pulsating riffs intertwine with the anthemic chorus in this first taste of new music in over five years from the iconic four-piece from Rockford, IL. Fans can pre-order the album beginning March 4 and listen to the first track here.

Bang Zoom Crazy…Hello follows the recent announcement about the band’s forthcoming induction into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. The long-awaited news celebrates the pioneering sound that has lead to sales in excess of 20 MILLION and more than 40 international GOLD and PLATINUM certifications for their multi-award winning back catalogue. Cheap Trick’s music has also been featured on more than 20 major feature film soundtracks.

Now into their fourth decade of recording, Bang Zoom Crazy…Hello marks Cheap Trick’s 17th studio album and was produced by GRAMMY award-winning producer Julian Raymond. Firmly cemented as one of the most important bands in music history, the quartet will continue their reign as the top progenitors of power-pop through 2016 and beyond with the release of Bang Zoom Crazy…Hello.

Cheap Trick are an indisputable American institution, beloved around the globe since 1974 for their instantly identifiable, hugely influential, brand of pop rock ‘n’ roll. The band – Robin Zander (vocals, rhythm guitar), Rick Nielsen (lead guitar), Tom Petersson (bass guitar), and Daxx Nielsen (drums) – are truly one-of-a-kind pioneers with an unparalleled streak of certifiably classic tunes such as “Surrender,” “I Want You To Want Me” and “Dream Police.”

Famous for having played over 5,000 shows in their career, Cheap Trick will hit the road again this summer in support of Bang Zoom Crazy…Hello and to celebrate their induction into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. The band will kick off the “Rock Hall Three For All” tour of the US alongside Heart and Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, beginning July 14 at the DTE Energy Music Theatre, Michigan. The 30-date tour will culminate at Florida’s Perfect Vodka Amphitheatre on September 23. Full Cheap Trick tour dates can be found at cheaptrick.com/tour-dates.

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The Rock Hall Three For All: Epic Tour To Feature Heart, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts And Cheap Trick

The Rock Hall Three For All: Epic Tour To Feature Heart, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts And Cheap Trick

heart-cheaptrick-joanjett

Three of rock music’s most iconic bands will hit the road together this summer on The Rock Hall Three For All Featuring Heart, Joan Jett & The Blackhearts and Cheap Trick. Produced by Live Nation, the tour will kick off on Thursday, July 14 at DTE Energy Music Theater in Clarkston, Mich. as the bands embark on a 30+ date trek across the United States with shows lined up in Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, Dallas, Nashville and more.

Citi® cardmembers will have access to pre-sale tickets beginning Tuesday, Jan. 19 at 10 a.m. local time through Citi’s Private Pass® Program. For complete pre-sale details, visit www.citiprivatepass.com. Fans with the Live Nation mobile app will have access to a password-free presale starting Wednesday, Jan. 20 at 10:00 a.m. at Ticketmaster-ticketed venues. The app is available via the App Store and Google Play. Tickets for the general public go on sale starting Jan. 22 at www.livenation.com.

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees Ann and Nancy Wilson first showed the world that women can rock when their band, Heart, stormed the charts in the ‘70’s with hits like “Crazy on You,” “Magic Man,” “Barracuda,” “Straight On,” and so many more. Not only did the Wilson sisters lead the band, they wrote the songs and played the instruments too, making them the first women in rock to do so. Heart continued topping the charts through the ‘80’s and ‘90’s with huge hits like “These Dreams,” “Alone,” “What About Love,” “If Looks Could Kill,” “Never,” and a string of other hits that showcased the sisters’ enormous talents as musicians, singers and songwriters. Along the way, music by Ann and Nancy Wilson and their band Heart sold more than 35 million albums, sold out arenas worldwide, and found their way into the soundtrack of American life through radio, motion pictures, television, and associations with branded sponsors. Powerful and exciting on stage, Heart performs their amazing show to many hundreds of thousands of fans annually.

Joan Jett is an originator, an innovator, and a visionary. As the leader of the hard-rocking Blackhearts, with whom she has become a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, she’s had eight platinum and gold albums and nine Top 40 singles, including the classics “Bad Reputation,” “I Love Rock ‘N’ Roll,” “I Hate Myself For Loving You,” and “Crimson and Clover.” She sits at the head of her own independent label, Blackheart Records. Jett has acted in movies and television, including 1987’s “Light Of Day,” and in a Tony-nominated Broadway musical, “The Rocky Horror Show.” She has appeared on such acclaimed television shows as ”Oprah” (the last season) and ‘Law and Order.” Jett and the Blackhearts released their latest record, “Unvarnished,” last year and continue touring the globe to throngs of adoring fans. “Unvarnished” debuted in the Top 50 on the Billboard 200 chart.

With over 5,000 performances spanning four decades and 20 million records sold worldwide, Cheap Trick is undoubtedly one of the most influential classic rock groups of the past 50 years. The band was formed in 1974 and while it has evolved throughout the years, Cheap Trick has continued to reach mainstream and critical success. Hits such as “I Want You To Want Me,” “Dream Police,” and “Surrender” have cemented the group as one of America’s top rock ‘n’ roll bands of all time. Cheap Trick will be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame this April.

ROCK HALL THREE FOR ALL FEATURING HEART, JOAN JETT & THE BLACKHEARTS AND CHEAP TRICK

*All dates, cities and venues below subject to change.

Upcoming Tour Dates:
Thursday, July 14 Clarkston, MI DTE Energy Music Theatre
Saturday, July 16 Maryland Heights, MO Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre – St. Louis
Sunday, July 17 Noblesville, IN Klipsch Music Center
Tuesday, July 19 Chicago, IL FirstMerit Bank Pavilion at Northerly Island
Thursday, July 21 Burgettstown, PA First Niagara Pavilion
Friday, July 22 Cincinnati, OH Riverbend Music Center
Sunday, July 24 Mansfield, MA Xfinity Center
Monday, July 25 Wallingford, CT Toyota Presents Oakdale
Wednesday, July 27 Darien Center, NY Darien Lake Performing Arts Center
Thursday, July 28 Wantagh, NY Nikon at Jones Beach Theater
Saturday, July 30 Bethel, NY Bethel Woods Center for the Arts
Sunday, July 31 Camden, NJ BB&T Pavilion
Monday, Aug. 15 Kansas City, MO Starlight Theatre
Thursday, Aug. 18 Dallas, TX Gexa Energy Pavilion
Friday, Aug. 19 Woodlands, TX Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion Pres. By Huntsman
Sunday, Aug. 21 Phoenix, AZ Ak-Chin Pavilion
Tuesday, Aug. 23 Los Angeles, CA The Forum
Wednesday, Aug. 24 Mountain View, CA Shoreline Amphitheatre
Friday, Aug. 26 Auburn, WA White River Amphitheatre
Saturday, Aug. 27 Ridgefield, WA Sunlight Supply Amphitheater
Tuesday, Aug. 30 Morrison, CO Red Rocks Amphitheatre
Thursday, Sept. 08 Saratoga Springs, NY Saratoga Performing Arts Center
Saturday, Sept. 10 Holmdel, NJ PNC Bank Arts Center
Sunday, Sept. 11 Bristow, VA Jiffy Lube Live
Tuesday, Sept. 13 Virginia Beach, VA Veterans United Home Loans Amphitheater at Virginia Beach
Wednesday, Sept. 14 Raleigh, NC Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
Friday, Sept. 16 Charlotte, NC PNC Music Pavilion
Monday, Sept. 19 Nashville, TN Ascend Amphitheater
Tuesday, Sept. 20 Pelham, AL Oak Mountain Amphitheatre
Thursday, Sept. 22 Tampa, FL MIDFLORIDA Credit Union Amphitheatre
Friday, Sept. 23 West Palm Beach, FL Perfect Vodka Amphitheatre

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THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL: An Interview With Burt Sugarman and Mark Goodman

THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL: An Interview With Burt Sugarman and Mark Goodman

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In the period between American Bandstand and MTV, sev­eral shows tried to bring rock ‘n’ roll to television.  In the wake of Elvis Presley and the Beatles’ debut on The Ed Sullivan Show, ’60s series like Hullabaloo, Shindig and The Music Scene featured rock and pop performers.  But it wasn’t until The Midnight Special premiered on August 19, 1972, that rock ‘n’ roll found its own home on the air.

Back in the early ’70s, the only ways for fans to see their favorite rock stars were in concert or in the pages of magazines like Rolling Stone or Creem. So the idea for The Midnight Special, which ran on NBC from 1972 to 1981, came to creator Burt Sugarman in a light-bulb moment. A veteran of producing Grammy Awards telecasts, Sugarman was frustrated by the network’s lack of programming after the The Tonight Show — the screen reverting to test patterns at 1:00 a.m. A next-door neighbor to Johnny Carson, Sugarman recognized this TV wasteland for what it was: a place where he could cater to an audience that craved seeing its latest rock ‘n’ roll heroes brought into their living rooms every Friday night. And, with the pilot, which premiered at 1:00 a.m. on August 19, 1972 with Johnny Rivers rendition of “The Midnight Special,” Leadbelly’s classic gospel song, he did just that.

The Midnight Special’s eclectic lineup reflected the show’s commitment not only to rock, but also to mirroring the Top 40 melting pot of the 70s, including genres such as folk, blues, R&B, soul, country and pop. For much of the run, the show was presided over by the legendary, gravelly-voiced DJ Wolfman Jack (Brooklyn-born Bob Smith), who was recruited as a perma­nent announcer and made his debut in Episode 2; he would go on to become the living symbol of the show and a powerful draw for perform­ers who were more than happy to share the stage with him. A variety of guest hosts appeared along with Wolfman Jack over the years including such ’70s music icons as the Bee Gees, David Bowie, Alice Cooper, Loggins and Messina, Richard Pryor, The O’Jays, Electric Light Orchestra, KC & the Sunshine Band, plus frequent host Helen Reddy. Viewers and members of the studio audience were treated to one-of-a-kind concert events direct from The Midnight Special stages featuring anyone from Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, Bee Gees and Earth, Wind & Fire to Electric Light Orchestra, Fleetwood Mac, Heart, Jim Croce or John Denver, performing their biggest hits live.

The TV DVD archivists at StarVista Entertainment/Time Life will bring consumers back to the ’70s for the seminal, groundbreaking live music TV show on DVD, featuring extensive bonus features! The Midnight Special Collector’s Edition, available exclusively online at MIDNIGHTSPECIALDVDS.COM has been released in a beautifully-packaged 11-disc set, featuring nearly 5 hours of specially-produced bonus features and a 32-page collector’s book.  There are also two retail configurations: a 6-disc set and a single DVD; which are now available in stores.

Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with the creator of this iconic series, Burt Sugarman, and former MTV VJ Mark Goodman to get a look inside their careers and bringing this awesome new collection to the masses!

You’ve been involved with projects that have really impacted the lives of many music fans, both with Midnight Special and of course, Mark, with MTV. What are some of your first musical memories and what impact did music have on your lives?

Burt Sugarman and his wife, Mary Hart.

Burt Sugarman and his wife, Mary Hart.

Burt Sugarman: Obviously, I’ve liked music forever, growing up as a kid and this and that, and my music taste changed. Country music was always in there, always important to me, but everything, everybody, and how many of these people were characters and what happened in their lives, et cetera, et cetera, that had nothing to do with Midnight Special, but that continually went through my psyche. I went to concerts here in Los Angeles at the Shrine Auditorium or wherever it might be, just loved it always, didn’t ever know early if I’d be in the music business.

Mark Goodman: My taste has been all over the place as well. My parents were into music big time. They loved jazz music, so I grew up listening to great jazz vocalists like Sarah Vaughan, Eartha Kitt, people like that, Dinah Washington. That was my earliest experiences. Then as a young teenager, while all my friends were listening to pop music, I was listening to black music in Philadelphia where I grew up, so I was listening to Smokey Robinson and the TSOP, which would come along a little bit later on, The Sound of Philadelphia. That was my thing, until all of sudden, I heard Cream, “Sunshine of Your Love,” and between that and a couple of other things that were going on with my generation at the time, I got into rock and roll, and the rest, as they say, is rock history.

I was curious what challenges you might have originally faced in bringing Midnight Special to life. I imagine it was quite the undertaking.

Burt Sugarman: Well, they were big, of course, at the time. I look back on that quite often. But first, I had trouble getting any of the networks. I wanted NBC because I wanted to follow The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. Johnny was a next-door neighbor of mine. We played tennis all the time together. I knew that that rating, when he went off, would be terrific to lead in to something but the network felt that the rock and roll people were all drugged out and half of them wouldn’t show, and what happened then was I said, “I’ll tell you what, I’ll put up the money,” and I said, “I’ll give you another reason. It’s a voting year, and I’ll make it a get-out-to-vote show for young people.” That’s pretty hard to turn down.
When I said that and the money, they said, “OK, go for it. If you’ll do that and they don’t show up, it’s your problem, not ours. We’ll give you the time.” But that was the toughest thing to overcome, and it took a few months of hard meetings to get it finished, Jason.

Mark Goodman

Mark Goodman

Mark Goodman: Burt, I got a question for you that maybe Jason would like to hear the answer to. I’m wondering what the bands thought because certainly at that time, it was, like, Before Midnight Special, it was really, like, American Bandstand. There really wasn’t that much going on, and certainly at that time of night, you have the freedom to do a lot more. Were the bands really into that idea of being able to play on TV for a national audience live? Was that a cool thing or was that something that everybody thought, “That’s never going to work. I don’t want to do that. It’s going to sound like crap?” What was their response?

Burt Sugarman: I’ll start with the musicians. The artists that were most comfortable walking in front of the camera, or, remember, I had an audience of a couple of hundred people there, were the country artists, and the reason is because they toured all the time, so that was just easy for them.
Some of the mainline artists, and I’m not going to go on who they are, were panicked, just panicked to walk out in front and see a red light on three or four cameras and start to sing or talk or something. The other thing is with me, they had to sing live. There was no lip syncing. So all that made it very interesting, but we got through it and loved every second of it.

Mark Goodman: And some of the performances are so incredible, and like you said, because they’re live, that’s what impresses me the most. Four months later, after you went off the air, MTV debuted, and of course, we were all lip sync.

Burt Sugarman: Yes, right. I remember Jim Croce coming out and looking at the camera, and he said, “I don’t know, man. I’m out of here,” and he actually wanted to leave. Fortunately, we could talk him into staying, and then his performance was sensational, and he wanted to come back three, four weeks later and do the show again, and unfortunately, he had that airplane accident.

Mark Goodman: Oh, jeez, oh. Wow.

Burt Sugarman: One other thing with Jim, somebody, it might have been Gladys Knight, somebody wanted to present me with a gold album for being responsible, they said, for selling all the records. Croce was the one who was going to give it to me. I said, “Look, I don’t go on camera. It’s just not what I want to do, and thank you so much.” He said, “Well, you don’t go on camera, then now that I’m ready to go on, I won’t go on. You have to go on camera.” I actually did for the first and only time I went on camera because of the way Jim said that to me. He had me nervous.

Mark Goodman: That’s great! Oh my God, that’s fantastic.

Burt Sugarman: He was a classic.

Mark Goodman: I hope that’s good, Jason.

Definitely, thank you. Obviously, you guys have experienced music from very different perspectives. I was curious, what’s the biggest lesson you’ve learned that you could pass along to people today looking to pursue a career in the music industry?

Burt Sugarman

Burt Sugarman

Mark Goodman: Don’t.

Burt Sugarman: This is probably the only time that I will disagree a little bit with Mark, in the spirit of cooperation, but I always feel, period, follow your dream.

Mark Goodman: I agree with you. I’m kidding, of course.

Burt Sugarman: Oh, I know that.

Mark Goodman: It’s a hell of a business. I think musicians now have to be, and in whatever genre, they have to understand that there has to be a bit more to what’s going on. I think honesty is key. I think people smell a phony. People smell hype, and we are more averse to hype than ever. So as an artist, you have to make sure that you are speaking honestly.

From the other side of it, from the business side of it, you have to understand how to use social media. You have to understand how that works and how that can feed your career because, like I was saying before, it is a level playing field in many ways, and there’s story after story after story of people who hosted a video on YouTube and wound up being signed in six months. After they get a million views on YouTube, you’re discovered. Does that make sense, Jason?

Yeah, I guess just as a followup, you mentioned your book, Mark. Any chance we might see some type of collaboration where we could get a book out of Burt as well?

Mark Goodman: I would love to see Burt write a book. Burt should write a book, just the stories that he’s told today.

Burt Sugarman: Burt is not going to write a book. He loves reading books. But I’ve just given it a long and hard thought, and I am not going to write a book.

It’s great to hear all these stories. I was wondering, looking back on both of your careers, are there any moments that you might wish you went a different direction or made a different decision and see how they played out, so to speak?

Mark Goodman

Mark Goodman

Burt Sugarman: For me, there’s been times certainly that I wished I had made a different decision. I mean that just goes along with it. Do I really want this act, and what happens if they go on the green room? My God, I should be very careful but not putting these two people, et cetera, et cetera. There’s times, and that’s just a small example, when you just make the wrong decision. You hope it’s not a serious one, and you want your correct decisions to be 75% and the wrong ones to be 25, and I think in life, you’ll be better.

Mark Goodman: By the way, it seems to me that Burt made those decisions. He went all over the place. You did everything that you could do.

Burt Sugarman: Exactly.

Mark Goodman: I have to say for me that I never doubted for a minute. I was one of these lucky kids who, by the time I was 13 years old, I realized that I was a crappy musician and I didn’t have the patience to practice, so I was trying to figure out what else I could do to be involved with music, and I realized at that age that radio was going to be my way, and I never looked back really. That was what I pursued, what I wanted to do, was what I pursued in college. I graduated with a degree in communications. I was working before I left college at two radio stations. I never, for a second, thought about television until I was working in New York in a radio station and somebody told me about this weird TV channel where they were going to be playing videos all the time. I segued into that by accident, but I never, ever … I have no discernible skills, is the problem, so I can only do this.

What’s up next for you both? Where do you have your eye on in the meantime that we can look forward to in the years to come?

Mark Goodman: I want to go into business with Burt Sugarman.

Burt Sugarman: Thank you for the compliment. As I said earlier, I’m curious, and that curiosity leads me into different ventures. My eyes are always open. I enjoy those things, and I continue to do them. Mark, how terrific it is at a very young, young age you knew what you wanted to do. That’s fabulous.

Mark Goodman: Yeah, I do feel really lucky, especially we all … Burt, you mentioned that you have your college-age kids. I have a 22-year-old daughter. So many have no idea, so I feel really, very, very lucky.

Burt Sugarman: Yeah, you did good, but they’ll find their way. Let them follow their dream, right?

Mark Goodman: That’s the advice I always give, is to love because everything becomes a job sooner or later, and if you love it, at least you’re still going to be able to go to work every day.

Burt Sugarman: You get up in the morning with a smile.

The 6-DVD and single-DVD versions are in-stores now. Click here to order via Amazon. The 11-disc Collector’s Edition is available to order exclusively through Time Life – Click here to order >

The Midnight Special

The Midnight Special

A “must-have” for fans of ’70s music and ’70s pop culture, THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL COLLECTOR’S EDITION, priced to add to every music lover’s home entertainment collection  at $99.95, features eight discs of 130 incredible live performances from the era’s greatest stars (carefully selected from 423 complete shows), one disc of comedy performances and two discs of specially-produced, exclusive bonus programming, including interviews with Peter Frampton, Alice Cooper, Loggins & Messina, Eddie Money, George Benson, Charlie Daniels, Todd Rundgren, Helen Reddy, Neil Sedaka, creator Burt Sugarman and many more; as well as 12 featurettes, including “The History of The Midnight Special,” “Wolfman at Midnight,” “Star-Studded Stage Fashion,” “No Safety Net: Live on TV,” “I Am Woman: Helen Reddy as Host,” “Benson & Frampton Talk Shop,” “The Making of The Midnight Special”  “The Legacy of The Midnight Special“, a Burt Sugarman featurette and more.  Additionally, the collector’s set includes a 32-page, full-color booklet with an intro from Burt Sugarman, artist photos, liner notes and more.

With nearly 10 hours of live performances, THE COLLECTOR’S EDITION features a roster of “who’s who” in ’70s music, including:

  • Aerosmith/ “Dream On”
  • Alice Cooper/ Medley: “Eighteen/Only Women/Billion Dollar Babies”
  • Bee Gees/ “Nights on Broadway”
  • Earth, Wind & Fire/ “Shining Star”
  • Electric Light Orchestra/ “Evil Woman”
  • Fleetwood Mac/ “Over My Head”
  • Gordon Lightfoot/ “Sundown”
  • Heart/ “Crazy on You”
  • Helen Reddy/ “I Am Woman”
  • Jim Croce/ “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown”
  • John Denver/ “Take Me Home, Country Roads”
  • KC and the Sunshine Band/ “That’s the Way (I Like It)”
  • LaBelle/ “Lady Marmalade”
  • Linda Ronstadt/ “When Will I Be Loved”
  • Marvin Gaye/ “Let’s Get It On”
  • Neil Sedaka/Captain & Tenille/ “Love Will Keep Us Together”
  • Peter Frampton/ “Show Me the Way”
  • REO Speedwagon/ “Keep on Loving You”
  • The Doobie Brothers/ “Listen to the Music”
  • Tom Petty and  the Heartbreakers/ “American Girl”

THE COLLECTOR’S EDITION also includes some unique collaborations that were a hallmark of The Midnight Special, such as:

  • Aretha Franklin & Ray Charles/ “Takes Two to Tango”
  • Carlos Santana & George Benson/ “Breezin'”
  • Etta James & Dr. John/ “I’d Rather Go Blind”
  • Gladys Knight & B.B. King/ “The Thrill Is Gone”
  • Helen Reddy & The Bee Gees/ “To Love Somebody”
  • John Denver & Cass Elliot/ “Leaving on a Jet Plane”
  • Neil Sedaka/Captain & Tenille/ “Love Will Keep Us Together”

The 6-disc retail set ($59.95srp) and the single ($12.95srp), will include 96 and 16 live performances, respectively, and a host of bonus features.

“It was so electric in the studio. We knew we were blazing new trails.” — Creator Burt Sugarman

A musical micro­cosm of its era with highlights offering some of the most indelible moments of the ’70s airwaves, The Midnight Special has, at long last, been preserved for music lovers everywhere.  And with in-depth featurettes and interviews, home audiences can truly visit the ’70s anytime, courtesy of StarVista Entertainment/Time Life.

midnight-special-2014-1

THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL COLLECTOR’S EDITION (11 DISCS)

Pre-order Begins: August 12, 2014

Price: $99.95

Run time: Approx. 16 hours

Online Exclusive Collection includes:

  • 11 DVDs in deluxe collector’s edition packaging
  • 130 Complete Live Performances
  • Classic comedy from The Midnight Special by Richard Pryor, Billy Crystal, George Carlin, Andy Kaufman, Steve Martin and Freddie Prinze, and more.
  • 32-page collector’s booklet with an intro by creator Burt Sugarman, liner notes from The Hollywood Reporter’s Contributing Editor Roy Trakin and archival photos
  • Almost 5 hours of hours of specially-created featurettes, in-depth interviews and more.
  • Twelve featurettes including: “Benson & Frampton Talk Shop,” “Burt Sugarman,” “George Benson: Early Influences,” “I Am Woman: Helen Reddy as Host,” “No Safety Net: Live on TV,” “Songwriting” Featurette, “Star-Studded Stage Fashion,” “The Musical Diversity of The Midnight Special,” “The History of The Midnight Special,” “The Legacy of The Midnight Special,” “Behind the Scenes of The Midnight Special,” and “Wolfman at Midnight”
  • Interviews with: Alice Cooper,  Burt Sugarman, Charlie Daniels, Christopher Cross, David Steinberg, Eddie Money, Frankie Valli, George Benson, Harry Wayne Casey, Helen Reddy, Kevin Cronin (REO Speedwagon), Loggins & Messina, Mark Goodman (MTV), Melissa Manchester, Neil Sedaka, O’Jays, Peter Frampton, Robert Bell, Thelma Houston, Todd Rundgren

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THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL: Late Night’s Original Rock N’ Roll Show Returns With Collector’s Edition!

THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL: Late Night’s Original Rock N’ Roll Show Returns With Collector’s Edition!

The Midnight Special

The Midnight Special

In the period between American Bandstand and MTV, sev­eral shows tried to bring rock ‘n’ roll to television.  In the wake of Elvis Presley and the Beatles’ debut on The Ed Sullivan Show, ’60s series like HullabalooShindig and The Music Scene featured rock and pop performers.  But it wasn’t until The Midnight Special premiered on August 19, 1972, that rock ‘n’ roll found its own home on the air.

This September, the TV DVD archivists at StarVista Entertainment/Time Life will bring consumers back to the ’70s for the seminal, groundbreaking live music TV show on DVD, featuring extensive bonus features!  THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL COLLECTOR’S EDITION, available exclusively online at MIDNIGHTSPECIALDVDS.COM beginning August 12, 2014 will be released in a beautifully-packaged 11-disc set, featuring nearly 5 hours of specially-produced bonus features and a 32-page collector’s book.  There will also be two retail configurations, available September 9: a 6-disc set and a single DVD.

 “It’s one of the definitive documents of what was really 
going on in music then.“– Steve Miller


Back in the early ’70s, the only ways for fans to see their favorite rock stars were in concert or in the pages of magazines like Rolling Stone or Creem.  So the idea for The Midnight Special, which ran on NBC from 1972 to 1981, came to creator Burt Sugarman in a light-bulb moment.  A veteran of producing Grammy Awards telecasts, Sugarman was frustrated by the network’s lack of programming after the The Tonight Show — the screen reverting to test patterns at 1:00 a.m.   A next-door neighbor to Johnny Carson, Sugarman recognized this TV wasteland for what it was: a place where he could cater to an audience that craved seeing its latest rock ‘n’ roll heroes brought into their living rooms every Friday night.  And, with the pilot, which premiered at 1:00 a.m. on August 19, 1972 with Johnny Rivers rendition of “The Midnight Special,” Leadbelly’s classic gospel song, he did just that.

The Midnight Special was one of the greatest
music television shows 
that was ever done.”  — Barry White

The Midnight Special’s eclectic lineup reflected the show’s commitment not only to rock,  but also to mirroring the Top 40 melting pot of the 70s, including genres such as folk, blues, R&B, soul, country and pop.  For much of the run, the show was presided over by the legendary, gravelly-voiced DJ Wolfman Jack (Brooklyn-born Bob Smith), who was recruited as a perma­nent announcer and made his debut in Episode 2; he would go on to become the living symbol of the show and a powerful draw for perform­ers who were more than happy to share the stage with him.  A variety of guest hosts appeared along with Wolfman Jack over the years including such ’70s music icons as the Bee Gees, David Bowie, Alice Cooper, Loggins and Messina, Richard Pryor, The O’Jays, Electric Light Orchestra, KC & the Sunshine Band, plus frequent host Helen Reddy.  Viewers and members of the studio audience were treated to one-of-a-kind concert events direct from The Midnight Special stages featuring anyone from Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, Bee Gees and Earth, Wind & Fire to Electric Light Orchestra, Fleetwood Mac, Heart, Jim Croce or John Denver, performing their biggest hits live.

Additionally, The Midnight Special featured the day’s top comedic talents, such as Richard Pryor, Billy Crystal, George Carlin, Andy Kaufman, Steve Martin and Freddie Prinze, among many others.

A “must-have” for fans of ’70s music and ’70s pop culture, THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL COLLECTOR’S EDITION, priced to add to every music lover’s home entertainment collection  at $99.95, features eight discs of 130 incredible live performances from the era’s greatest stars (carefully selected from 423 complete shows), one disc of comedy performances and two discs of specially-produced, exclusive bonus programming, including interviews with Peter Frampton, Alice Cooper, Loggins & Messina, Eddie Money, George Benson, Charlie Daniels, Todd Rundgren, Helen Reddy, Neil Sedaka, creator Burt Sugarman and many more; as well as 12 featurettes, including “The History of The Midnight Special,” “Wolfman at Midnight,” “Star-Studded Stage Fashion,” “No Safety Net: Live on TV,” “I Am Woman: Helen Reddy as Host,” “Benson & Frampton Talk Shop,” “The Making of The Midnight Special”  “The Legacy of The Midnight Special“, a Burt Sugarman featurette and more.  Additionally, the collector’s set includes a 32-page, full-color booklet with an intro from Burt Sugarman, artist photos, liner notes and more.

With nearly 10 hours of live performances, THE COLLECTOR’S EDITION features a roster of “who’s who” in ’70s music, including:

  • Aerosmith/ “Dream On”
  • Alice Cooper/ Medley: “Eighteen/Only Women/Billion Dollar Babies”
  • Bee Gees/ “Nights on Broadway”
  • Earth, Wind & Fire/ “Shining Star”
  • Electric Light Orchestra/ “Evil Woman”
  • Fleetwood Mac/ “Over My Head”
  • Gordon Lightfoot/ “Sundown”
  • Heart/ “Crazy on You”
  • Helen Reddy/ “I Am Woman”
  • Jim Croce/ “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown”
  • John Denver/ “Take Me Home, Country Roads”
  • KC and the Sunshine Band/ “That’s the Way (I Like It)”
  • LaBelle/ “Lady Marmalade”
  • Linda Ronstadt/ “When Will I Be Loved”
  • Marvin Gaye/ “Let’s Get It On”
  • Neil Sedaka/Captain & Tenille/ “Love Will Keep Us Together”
  • Peter Frampton/ “Show Me the Way”
  • REO Speedwagon/ “Keep on Loving You”
  • The Doobie Brothers/ “Listen to the Music”
  • Tom Petty and  the Heartbreakers/ “American Girl”

THE COLLECTOR’S EDITION also includes some unique collaborations that were a hallmark of The Midnight Special, such as:

  • Aretha Franklin & Ray Charles/ “Takes Two to Tango”
  • Carlos Santana & George Benson/ “Breezin'”
  • Etta James & Dr. John/ “I’d Rather Go Blind”
  • Gladys Knight & B.B. King/ “The Thrill Is Gone”
  • Helen Reddy & The Bee Gees/ “To Love Somebody”
  • John Denver & Cass Elliot/ “Leaving on a Jet Plane”
  • Neil Sedaka/Captain & Tenille/ “Love Will Keep Us Together”

The 6-disc retail set ($59.95srp) and the single ($12.95srp), will include 96 and 16 live performances, respectively, and a host of bonus features.

“It was so electric in the studio. We knew we were blazing new trails.” — Creator Burt Sugarman

A musical micro­cosm of its era with highlights offering some of the most indelible moments of the ’70s airwaves, The Midnight Special has, at long last, been preserved for music lovers everywhere.  And with in-depth featurettes and interviews, home audiences can truly visit the ’70s anytime, courtesy of StarVista Entertainment/Time Life.

#  #  #

THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL COLLECTOR’S EDITION (11 DISCS)

Pre-order Begins: August 12, 2014

Price: $99.95

Run time: Approx. 16 hours

Online Exclusive Collection includes:

  • 11 DVDs in deluxe collector’s edition packaging
  • 130 Complete Live Performances
  • Classic comedy from The Midnight Special by Richard Pryor, Billy Crystal, George Carlin, Andy Kaufman, Steve Martin and Freddie Prinze, and more.
  • 32-page collector’s booklet with an intro by creator Burt Sugarman, liner notes from The Hollywood Reporter’s Contributing Editor Roy Trakin and archival photos
  • Almost 5 hours of hours of specially-created featurettes, in-depth interviews and more.
  • Twelve featurettes including: “Benson & Frampton Talk Shop,” “Burt Sugarman,” “George Benson: Early Influences,” “I Am Woman: Helen Reddy as Host,” “No Safety Net: Live on TV,” “Songwriting” Featurette, “Star-Studded Stage Fashion,” “The Musical Diversity of The Midnight Special,” “The History of The Midnight Special,” “The Legacy of The Midnight Special,” “Behind the Scenes of The Midnight Special,” and “Wolfman at Midnight”
  • Interviews with: Alice Cooper,  Burt Sugarman, Charlie Daniels, Christopher Cross, David Steinberg, Eddie Money, Frankie Valli, George Benson, Harry Wayne Casey, Helen Reddy, Kevin Cronin (REO Speedwagon), Loggins & Messina, Mark Goodman (MTV), Melissa Manchester, Neil Sedaka, O’Jays, Peter Frampton, Robert Bell, Thelma Houston, Todd Rundgren

THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL COLLECTION (6 DISCS)

Street Date: September 9

Price: $59.95 srp

Run time: 8 hrs., 27 mins.

THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL (SINGLE)

Street Date: September 9

Price: $12.95 srp

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2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Rocks HBO Tonight!

2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Rocks HBO Tonight!

rock-and-roll-hall-of-fameAre you ready to rock? The 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony debuts on HBO Saturday, May 18 at 9pm!

The Performer Category Inductees this year are Heart, Albert King, Randy Newman, Public Enemy, Rush and Donna Summer. The Ahmet Ertegun Non-Performer Category Inductees are Lou Adler and Quincy Jones. The HBO special features a star-studded lineup, including: Heart, Randy Newman, Public Enemy, Rush, John Mayer, Foo Fighters, Jennifer Hudson, and rock legends Tom Petty, John Fogerty, and Jackson Browne.

HBO Signature will present a 24-hour marathon of the HBO special beginning at midnight the same day the special debuts on HBO, and concluding May 19 at midnight.

Other HBO playdates: May 24 (5:00 p.m., 12:15 a.m.), 26 (4:10 p.m.), 28 (9:45 p.m., 4:05 a.m.) and 31 (12:30 p.m.), and June 1 (1:00 p.m.), 3 (1:45 p.m.) and 5 (2:20 a.m.)
HBO2 playdates: May 20 (9:30 a.m., 10:00 p.m.), 22 (12:10 a.m.) and 30 (10:55 a.m., 10:00 p.m.), and June 9 (7:30 a.m.) and 18 (5:30 p.m.)

Don’t miss the 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony on Saturday, May 18 at 9pm, only on HBO.

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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Announces Initial Presenters, Performers & Ticketing For 2013 Induction Ceremony

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Announces Initial Presenters, Performers & Ticketing For 2013 Induction Ceremony

rock-and-roll-hall-of-fameThe Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum announced today the initial presenters, performers and ticketing information for the 28th Annual Rock and Rock Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, to be held at Nokia Theatre L.A. LIVE in Los Angeles on Thursday, April 18, 2013. The ceremony will honor this year’s recently announced inductees: Heart, Albert King, Randy Newman, Public Enemy, Rush and Donna Summer; as well as Lou Adler and Quincy Jones, this year’s recipients of the Ahmet Ertegun Award for Lifetime Achievement. Special guests at the 28th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction are set to include John Mayer and Gary Clark Jr., who will perform for King, with Mayer giving the induction speech; 1998 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Don Henley, who will induct Newman; Christina Aguilera and Jennifer Hudson, who will perform in honor of Summer; and Dave Grohl and Taylor Hawkins of the Foo Fighters, who will induct Rush. More details about performances, additional presenters and special guests will be announced at a later date.

Advance tickets for American Express Cardmembers will be available from Thursday, January 24 at 10 a.m. PST through Sunday, January 27 at 10 p.m. PST.  Tickets can be purchased via Ticketmaster.

Preferred seating presales for members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, as well as members of the Heart and Rush official fan clubs, will begin on Monday, January 28 at 10 a.m. PST through Thursday, January 31 at 10 p.m. PST at Ticketmaster.   Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum members should reference the official member e-newsletter for details. For more information on Rush and Heart fan club tickets, visit http://www.heart-music.com/ and http://www.rush.com/.  Some restrictions apply.

The public on-sale will begin on Friday, February 1 at 10 a.m. PST. To purchase tickets, visit Ticketmaster or charge-by-phone at 1-800-745-3000.  There will be a four-ticket limit on all orders.   Additionally, three levels of VIP packages will be available through Ticketmaster.

The induction ceremony will be broadcast on HBO on Saturday, May 18 at 9 p.m. EST/PST.

About the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc. is the nonprofit organization that exists to educate visitors, fans and scholars from around the world about the history and continuing significance of rock and roll music. It carries out this mission through its operation of a world-class museum that collects, preserves, exhibits and interprets this art form and through its library and archives as well as its educational programs. When you become a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, the world of rock and roll becomes yours to explore. Call 216.515.8425 for information on becoming a member. For general inquiries, please call 216.781.ROCK (7625) or visit www.rockhall.com.

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The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation Announces Nominees for 2013 Induction

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation Announces Nominees for 2013 Induction

The nominees for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2013 are:

  • The Paul Butterfield Blues Band
  • Chic
  • Deep Purple
  • Heart
  • Joan Jett and the Blackhearts
  • Albert King
  • Kraftwerk
  • The Marvelettes
  • The Meters
  • Randy Newman
  • N.W.A
  • Procol Harum
  • Public Enemy
  • Rush
  • Donna Summer

“The definition of ‘rock and roll’ means different things to different people, but as broad as the classifications may be, they all share a common love of the music,” commented Joel Peresman, President and CEO of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation. “This year we again proudly put forth a fantastic array of groups and artists that span the entire genre that is ‘rock and roll’.”

To be eligible for nomination, an individual artist or band must have released its first single or album at least 25 years prior to the year of nomination. The 2013 Nominees had to release their first recording no later than 1987.

Ballots will be sent to an international voting body of more than 600 artists, historians and members of the music industry.

All inductees are ultimately represented in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, the nonprofit organization that exists to educate its audiences on the global impact of the rock and roll art form via the museum, as well as its education programs and library and archives.

The 28th Annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will be held in Los Angeles at the Nokia Theatre L.A. LIVE on Thursday, April 18, 2013. The show will be broadcast on HBO at a later date.

*****************

About the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 2013 Nominees:

THE PAUL BUTTERFIELD BLUES BAND

“I was born in Chicago – nineteen and forty-one…” The racially mixed Paul Butterfield Blues Band blasted-off from the Windy City with a wall-of-sound fueled by Butterfield’s inspired harmonica and lead guitarist Mike Bloom­field’s explosive lead guitar – at that moment, American rock and roll collided with the real South­side Chicago blues and there was no turning back. Along with original members Elvin Bishop on second guitar and Mark Naftalin on organ, they conquered the landmark 1965 Newport Folk Festival. It was there Bob Dylan borrowed Bloomfield and the Butterfield band’s African-American rhythm section of Sam Lay on drums and bassist Jerome Arnold (both former Howlin’ Wolf band members) for his world-shaking electric debut that Sunday evening. The Butterfield band converted the country-blues purists and turned on the Fillmore generation to the pleasures of Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Little Walter, Willie Dixon and Elmore James. With the release of their blues-drenched debut album in the fall of 1965, and its adventurous East-West follow-up in the summer of ’66, the Paul Butterfield Blues Band kicked open a door that brought a defining new edge to rock and roll.

CHIC
Chic’s founding partnership consisted of songwriter-producer-guitarist Nile Rodgers and bassist Bernard Edwards (1952-1996), abetted by future Power Station drummer Tony Thompson (1954-2003). They rescued disco in 1977 with a combination of groove, soul and distinctly New York City studio smarts. Rodgers’ chopping rhythm guitar alongside Edwards’ deft bass lines were the perfect counterpart to melodic arrangements with their two female vocalists Alfa Anderson and Norma Jean Wright (replaced by Luci Martin). Out-of-the-box chart smashes “Dance, Dance, Dance (Yowsah, Yowsah, Yowsah),” the #1 “Le Freak” and #1 “Good Times” (ranked on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Singles Of All Time) made Chic the preeminent disco band – emphasis on the word ‘band’ – of the late ’70s. Their music also extended disco’s tenure at a critical moment, as hip-hop (and later in the ’80s, New Jack Swing) began to take the stage. Over the years, artists such as Sugar Hill Gang and Diddy have turned to Chic for beats and samples: “Good Times” has been checked everywhere from “Rapper’s Delight” and Blondie’s “Rapture,” to Queen’s “Another One Bites The Dust.” Rodgers and Edwards followed their five years in Chic with careers as top-flight producers for an A-list of megastars. Under Rodgers’ leadership, Chic has continued to tour, releasing live performances of its shows in Japan and Amsterdam.

DEEP PURPLE
Taking their name from a ’30s swingtime-era pop hit, there was nothing breathy or sentimental about the British quintet Deep Purple, first organized in 1967, around a core of phenomenally brilliant musicians. Classically trained, former child prodigy Jon Lord (1941–2012) was responsible for the towering wall of organ sound that formed the band’s bedrock. Lord found an ally for his classical ideas in ace session guitarist Ritchie Blackmore. (In fact, Deep Purple was among the first to stage an orchestral concerto, a concept attempted with varying degrees of success by other bands through the years.) Rod Evans joined next, with the powerful vocal template that was introduced on 1968’s “Hush” (a Joe South song) and “Kentucky Woman” (Neil Diamond). Evans brought along his former band’s thundering drummer, Ian Paice, but Evans was eventually replaced by longtime frontman Ian Gillan; multi-instrumental Welsh bassist Roger Glover completed the first definitive lineup. Their onslaught of sound along with such contemporaries as Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin, led rock critics to coin a new musical genre: heavy metal. The original lineup reached an early peak on the landmark albumsMachine Head and Who Do We Think We Are, whose epic chart singles “Smoke On The Water” and “Woman From Tokyo” sold Gibson Les Paul and Fender Stratocaster guitars in numbers that stagger the imagination. Deep Purple lineups have ebbed and flowed over the decades, counting among their members such formidable rockers as singer David Coverdale and bassist Glenn Hughes. Touring around the world now for more than four decades, still led by Gillan, Glover and Paice, the legend of Deep Purple will endure forever.

HEART
With a mix of hard rock riffs and lush, driving harmonies, Heart emerged from the Pacific Northwest with one of the most original sounds of the 1970s. Behind Ann Wilson’s powerhouse voice—one of the best in rock—and Nancy Wilson’s percussive guitar playing, along with guitarist Roger Fisher, bassist Steve Fossen, guitarist/keyboard player Howard Leese and drummer Michael DeRosier, Heart recorded a series of albums that stand as the best mix of hard rock and folk rock of their era: Dreamboat Annie, Little Queen, Dog And Butterfly and Bebe Le Strange. All those records included hit singles that remain standards of rock radio: “Magic Man,” “Crazy On You,” “Heartless” and “Barracuda.” Over their long career, Heart has released six Top 10 albums and twenty Top 40 singles. The first women to front a hard rock band, Ann and Nancy Wilson were pioneers, claiming the stage in a way that inspired women to pick up an electric guitar or start a band. When MTV transformed mainstream rock in the 1980s, Heart adapted and recorded some of the signature songs of the era: “Alone,” “What About Love” and “These Dreams.” In the 1990s, they returned to their roots with Desire Walks On and The Road Home, and in the last decade, they’ve released two of the strongest albums of their careers: Jupiter’s Darling and Red Velvet Car.

JOAN JETT and the BLACKHEARTS
Joan Jett and the Blackhearts created a potent mix of hard rock, glam, punk, metal and garage rock that sounds fresh and relevant in any era. Their biggest hit, “I Love Rock ‘N’ Roll” (#1 in 1982) is a rock classic – as pure and simple a statement about the music’s power as “Roll Over Beethoven.” The honesty and power of their records make you believe that rock and roll can change the world. As Jett once described rock and roll, “It’s a feeling thing, it’s emotion. You don’t think about it. If you start thinking rock ‘n’ roll, you’re f**ked. That’s when you’re homogenized. That’s when it’s boring. And that’s when it’s bullshit.” From her days as a founding member of the all-female Runaways, Jett has made loud, hook-laden records that convey toughness and joy. Sporting black leather and a shag to create a sexy and androgynous look, Jett took over a role formerly reserved for male rockers. She formed the Blackhearts in 1982, and their classic four-piece sound muscled past the synthesizers that dominated the 1980s and carried the flag for rock and roll. Three of their albums – I Love Rock ‘N’ Roll, Album and Up Your Alley – reached the Top 20, behind songs written by Jett and manager Kenny Laguna. By covering songs from all corners of the rock catalogue – from Gary Glitter to Tommy James to Sly and the Family Stone – the band effortlessly broke down barriers between genres and eras. In the 1990s, Jett’s no-nonsense attitude and vocal style was a major influence on the riot grrrl movement, and she went on to produce Bikini Kill and record with L7. She continues to be an inspiration for young female rockers.

ALBERT KING
He was born in the same fervid Mississippi Delta town of Indianola as another King of the Blues guitar, B.B. King. But where B.B. moved to the blues mecca of Memphis during the Second World War to establish his reign, Albert King (1923-1992) did not arrive there until more than a decade into his career in 1966. He was signed by Atlantic subsidiary Stax-Volt Records in the era when singles ruled and he had cut more than a dozen singles for various labels over the previous decade, most notably on King and Bobbin. His first Stax album was an influential collection that included “Born Under A Bad Sign,” “Crosscut Saw,” “As The Years Go Passing By” and his cover of Ivory Joe Hunter’s “I Almost Lost My Mind,” tracks mostly recorded with Booker T. and the MG’s as studio backup (with the Memphis Horns). Like B.B. and Freddie, Albert King was thrust into the Fillmore generation when British acts like Cream and Jimi Hendrix adopted “Born Under A Bad Sign” (written by Booker T and William Bell), which became a rock anthem and a part of the rock and roll lexicon. The younger generation following them also discovered a mother lode of blues in Albert’s repertoire. In particular, Stevie Ray Vaughan was an avid follower, and as early as 1983, SRV was onstage with Albert in Canada for a set (released 16 years later) that included a 15-minute jam on “Blues At Sunrise.” At Stevie Ray’s insistence, their paths intersected frequently over the next decade. From Eric Clapton, Mike Bloomfield and Johnny Winter, to Joe Walsh, Stevie Ray, Derek Trucks and beyond, the influence of Albert King’s husky vocals and his signature Gibson Flying V guitar will live on forever.

KRAFTWERK
Kraftwerk is the foundation upon which all synthesizer-based rock and roll and electronic dance music is built. Founded in Düsseldorf in 1970 by the band’s two core members, Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider, the group was a part of a new wave of musicians in Germany collectively referred to as Kosimsche Musik (cosmic music) who explored the intersection of rock and roll and the avant-garde. Their first three albums capture the sound of an experimental proto-punk jam band riffing on the sounds of Hawkwind and the Velvet Underground, but their fourth albumAutobahn (1974) established the beginning of something entirely new (created with longtime friend and producer Konrad “Conny” Plank). The twenty-two minute title track combined the diverse influences of the Beach Boys and Karlheinz Stockhausen into the creation of an electronic musical odyssey. It also represented a miraculous use of technology through its amalgamation of Moog synthesizers, multi-track recording and traditional instrumentation. The 1977 album, Trans-Europe Express, completed Kraftwerk’s transformation into a synthesized quartet. The album featured some of the funkiest grooves and vocoder melodies ever put on wax. New York City’s burgeoning hip-hop community quickly latched on to the album and DJ Afrika Bambaataa based his track “Planet Rock” (1982) on Kraftwerk’s beats. The years that followed secured Kratwerk’s place as both musical innovators and master songwriters and the albums, The Man-Machine (1978), Computer World (1981) and Electric Café (1986) established the blueprint for the sound and image of modern electronic music. Kraftwerk’s influence can be heard in the synth-pop of Depeche Mode, the electronic-rock integration of U2 and the DJ/Laptop artist vibrations of Deadmau5 and Skrillex.

THE MARVELETTES
Though they were overshadowed at Motown by the much longer-lived Supremes and Martha & the Vandellas, nevertheless the plaintive girl group harmonies of the Marvelettes – the original foursome of Gladys Horton, Katherine Anderson, Georgeanna Tillman and Wanda Young – deserve their rightful spot in rock history. They gave Motown/Tamla its first official #1 Hot 100 hit in the late-summer of 1961, “Please Mr. Postman” (famously featuring Marvin Gaye on drums); and recorded Motown’s first Holland-Dozier-Holland chart single, “Locking Up My Heart.” The Marvelettes went on, despite tremendous odds, to sing (and occasionally co-write) hit after hit for The Sound Of Young America for another seven years. Their signature tunes became classics of the next generation: “Please Mr. Postman” (Beatles, Carpenters), “Beechwood 4-5789” (Carpenters), “Too Many Fish In The Sea” (Mitch Ryder, Rascals), “Danger! Heartbreak Dead Ahead” (Bonnie Raitt), “The Hunter Gets Captured By The Game” (Jerry Garcia, Grace Jones, Blondie) and more. The Marvelettes did more than their fair share to put Motown on the map, and bring the heart of soul to rock and roll.

THE METERS
James Brown, Sly and the Family Stone and Parliament-Funkadelic all coasted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Yet one of the true cornerstones of funk is still waiting for induction. The Meters were not only the leading instrumental unit to emerge from the great musical gumbo of New Orleans, they were also one of the tightest and hardest-grooving ensembles R&B has ever seen. The Meters formed in 1965 with a line-up of keyboardist and vocalist Art Neville, guitarist Leo Nocentelli, bassist Geroge Porter Jr. and drummer Joseph “Zigaboo” Modeliste; the group was later joined by percussionist/vocalist Cyril Neville. The Meters first came to local prominence as the house band for Allen Toussaint’s record label, Sansu. In 1969, the band went on its own and released a string of definitive, irresistibly slamming singles— “Sophisticated Cissy,” “Cissy Strut,” “Look-Ka Py Py” and “Chicken Strut.” In the years that followed, the band became one of the hottest session groups in the world, working with Paul McCartney, Robert Palmer and LaBelle. They recorded extensively with their homeboy Dr. John, including his Desitively Bonnaroo album and the smash hit “Right Place, Wrong Time,” and provided the musical backbone for such modern New Orleans classics as The Wild Tchoupitoulas and the Neville Brothers’ Fiyo On The Bayou. With the explosion of hip-hop, the group became familiar to a new audience when its records were sampled countless times by the likes of RUN DMC, N.W.A, Public Enemy and the Beastie Boys. Meters songs have been covered by everyone from the Red Hot Chili Peppers to the Grateful Dead, illustrating the far-reaching influence of these masters of funk.

RANDY NEWMAN
Cynical romantic, subversive political satirist, social commentator, champion of the underdog – and brilliant one-man medicine show in the bargain – Randy Newman has been one of pop music’s secret hidden weapons for more than four decades. Raised in Los Angeles, the summers he spent in New Orleans as a youngster had a profound influence on both his piano style and his songwriting, which in later years skewered Southern stereotypes in an ironic fashion that only an insider could get away with. A songwriter since his teens, his earliest songs were covered by artists ranging from Gene Pitney and Alan Price, to Judy Collins, Dusty Springfield and Three Dog Night, highlighted by the 1970 ‘tribute’ LP, Nilsson Sings Newman. His sardonic wit and unabashed sentimentality have inspired a myriad of American and British songwriters to stretch the envelope and in so doing, expand the boundaries of rock, pop, folk, country, R&B and (since the ’80s) film music. A six-time Grammy winner, two-time Oscar winner, three-time Emmy winner (the list goes on), Randy Newman is an American treasure.

N.W.A
N.W.A is one of the most important groups in hip-hop history. Their aggressive, boundary smashing, don’t-give-a-fuck perspective was made clear by their name, which stands for Niggaz Wit Attitude. Their most famous single was “Fuck The Police” which was a minimalist classic that described the frustration and anger young black men felt toward the LAPD, years before the Rodney King riots broke out. Some call them the Beatles of hip-hop because of their massive influence, sonic power and their place as a launching pad for several critical solo careers. Dr. Dre, the greatest producer in hip-hop history, created the G-Funk sound he would become known for while he was in N.W.A. The G-Funk sound, built on P-Funk samples, synthesizer-heavy, cinematic and ominous themes would shape a generation of hip-hop. Ice Cube, who would become one of the most important MCs in hip-hop history was also in the group as was Eazy-E, an unforgettable figure. The group also included MC Ren, a formidable MC and DJ Yella, an important producer. N.W.A is the prime influence for the sound, ideology, vibe and look of gangsta rap and the L.A. hip-hop sound. They attracted nationwide attention for their albums Straight Outta Compton and Niggaz4Life. Indeed, the FBI sent the group a warning letter that is on exhibit at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.

PROCOL HARUM
A multitude of evolutions swept across the face of rock in the tumult of 1967, and none was so jarring and unexpected as the stately grandeur of Procol Harum’s “A Whiter Shade Of Pale,” with its “sixteen vestal virgins, who were leaving for the coast” – on Top 40 radio. There was no precedent for the onslaught of Matthew Fisher’s haunting cathedral-sized organ swirls, or the keening vocals of pianist Gary Brooker, who gave gothic voice to the poetry of the unseen group member, enigmatic lyricist Keith Reid. The touring and recording group settled into a brilliantly talented quintet with guitarist Robin Trower, bassist Dave Knights and one of British rock’s premier drummers, B.J. Wilson. Procol Harum forever raised the intelligence quotient of rock with their next two albums, Shine On Brightly (with its 18-minute masterwork, “In Held ’Twas I”) and A Salty Dog. The stage was set in 1972, for rock’s first and arguably greatest major orchestral project, whose evocative “Conquistador” is a dramatic tour de force that has held onto its mystique for four decades. Various personnel changes have revolved around the core of Brooker and Reid, but as their numerous live albums of the past twenty years have proved, the whole continues to be greater than the sum of its parts.

PUBLIC ENEMY
“No one has been able to approach the political power that Public Enemy brought to hip-hop,” Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys told Rolling Stone in 2004, “I put them on a level with Bob Marley and a handful of other artists – the rare artist who can make great music and also deliver a message.” Public Enemy brought an explosion of sonic invention, rhyming virtuosity and social awareness to hip-hop in the 1980s and 1990s. The group’s high points – 1988’s It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back and 1990’s Fear Of A Black Planet, stand among the greatest politically-charged albums of all time. Powered by producer Hank Shocklee and his crew the Bomb Squad, Nation Of Millions was a layered masterpiece that took the ethic of the hip-hop breakbeat – using only the best parts of any given song – and advanced it geometrically, building new music out of a thicket of samples and beats: tracks like “Rebel Without A Pause,” “Night Of The Living Baseheads” and “Black Steel In The Hour Of Chaos” are triumphs of funk, fury and collage. Chuck D. – routinely rated as one of the greatest rappers of all time – pushed the art of the MC forward with his inimitable, rapid-fire baritone as he connected the culture of hip-hop with Black Nationalism and the ideas of Malcolm X. His counterpart, Flavor Flav, brought humor (in the case of “911 Is A Joke,” pointed humor) and a madcap energy. Along the way, they brought a new level of conceptual sophistication to the hip-hop album, and a new level of intensity and power to live hip-hop, inspiring fans from Jay-Z to Rage Against the Machine to Kurt Cobain. After Public Enemy, hip-hop could never again be dismissed as kids’ music.

RUSH
Equal parts Led Zeppelin, Cream and King Crimson, Rush burst out of Canada in the early 1970s with one of the most powerful and bombastic sounds of the decade. Their 1976 magnum opus 2112 represents progressive rock at its grandiose heights, but just a half decade later they had the guts to put epic songs aside in favor of shorter (but no less dynamic) tunes like “Tom Sawyer” and “The Spirit Of Radio” that remain in constant rotation on radio to this day. Absolutely uncompromising in every conceivable way, the trio has spent the last forty years cultivating the largest cult fan base in rock while still managing to sell out every arena in the country. While they have never gotten the critical respect they so richly deserve, Neil Peart has inspired more young drummers to take up the instrument than any other drummer of the past thirty years. No less impressive is Geddy Lee’s ability to play keyboards and bass in concert while never missing a note of his lead vocals, and guitarist Alex Lifeson is a virtuoso simply without peer. They are a band completely removed from the mainstream music scene, and yet somehow also one of the most popular rock bands in the country. It is a dichotomy that has fueled them from the very beginning. Their newest release, Clockwork Angels, is as bold and ambitious as any of their works of the 1970s, and even though the members are now pushing sixty it is hard to shake the feeling that they are just getting started.

DONNA SUMMER
Her lifetime in music was a study in contrasts: The “Queen Of Disco” who was a church-reared gospel singer throughout childhood, and wrote most of her own songs; the Diva De Tutti Dive, the first true pop diva of the modern era, who spent her formative years in a psychedelic rock band, even auditioned for Broadway’s Hair in the early ’70s. She did not get the part, but whenHair opened in Germany, Boston’s LaDonna Adrian Gaines (1948-2012) was cast as Sheila. She settled in Germany and began a long-term association with Munich song­writers-producers Giorgio Moroder and Pete Bellotte. They heard her demo lyric “love to love you baby” and at Casablanca Records president Neil Bogart’s request, turned it into a 17-minute opus of orgasmic delight (Donna said she was evoking Marilyn Monroe). The song was Summer’s U.S. chart debut and first of nineteen #1 Dance hits between ’75 and 2008 (second only to Madonna). Summer made chart history in 1978-80, as the only artist to have three consecutive double-LPs hit #1: Live And More, Bad Girls and On The Radio. She was also the first female artist with four #1 singles in a 13-month period: “MacArthur Park,” “Hot Stuff,” “Bad Girls” and “No More Tears” (with Barbra Streisand). Her first U.S.-recorded LP, 1982’s self-titled Donna Summer, produced by Quincy Jones, featured Bruce Spring­steen, Roy Bittan and many American rockers. “She Works Hard For The Money” kept Donna on top in 1983, followed by the Top 10 “This Time I Know It’s For Real” in ’89. Starting in 2009, she extended her string of #1 U.S. Dance hits with “I’m A Fire,” “Stamp Your Feet,” “Fame (The Game)” and “To Paris With Love.” Endless covers and sampling of her music by producers and DJs have kept the five-time Grammy Award-winner’s pioneering body of work on the front-line.

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