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Noah Emmerich Discusses His Career, Philanthropy And Role In ‘Jane Got A Gun’

Noah Emmerich Discusses His Career, Philanthropy And Role In ‘Jane Got A Gun’

Noah Emmerich

Noah Emmerich has become a familiar face over the past two decades, starring alongside some of Hollywood’s biggest names. With each new project, he cultivates an incredible body of work while also honing his craft. His continuing success led him to his current role as the antagonist on one of the most critically acclaimed TV dramas of the decade, FX’s “The Americans.” His latest project for the big screen, “Jane Got A Gun,” pairs him with Academy Award© winner Natalie Portman (“Black Swan,” “Star Wars Episodes I-III,” “The Professional”), Joel Edgerton (“Black Mass,” “The Gift,” “The Great Gatsby”), Ewan McGregor (“August: Osage County,” “The Island”), Rodrigo Santoro (“Focus,” “300: Rise of an Empire”) and Boyd Holbrook (“Gone Girl,” “Run All Night”).

The film centers around Jane Hammond (Natalie Portman), who built a life on the rugged western plains with her husband Bill “Ham” Hammond (Noah Emmerich) and young daughter. When Ham stumbles home riddled with bullets after a run-in with the relentless John Bishop (Ewan McGregor) and his gang, she knows they will not stop until her family is dead. In desperation, Jane seeks help from Dan Frost (Joel Edgerton), a man from her past. Haunted by old memories, Jane’s past meets the present in a heart-stopping battle for survival.

Jason Price recently caught up with Noah Emmerich to discuss his journey as an actor, his latest project, “Jane Got A Gun,” and where the future might take him.

You are such a familiar face to audiences on television and in film. What intrigued you about acting early and ultimately made you pursue it as a career?

Noah Emmerich

Noah Emmerich

That is a good question. You know, it wasn’t something I was pursuing since childhood. A lot of actors get the bug early on and know that is what they want to do but I was not headed in that direction at all. I was studying history as an undergraduate and I thought I was headed to law school. On a lark, I got a role in the commencement show of my college and did a role in “Anything Goes.” I was a singer. I had been involved in the arts but more as a musician than an actor. My friend was directing the play and he needed a bass voice because there weren’t that many basses. I said, “That is crazy! I am not an actor.” He said, “Why don’t you just try it.” I did and I had the greatest time. It was such a thrilling time and it felt like I had tapped into something I had, perhaps, wanted to do for awhile but hadn’t realized it or let myself acknowledge it. It was really sort of a revolution from my perspective on what the future held. I thought, “I definitely want to do more of this. I don’t know when that is possible in law school. Maybe I will put things on hold for awhile and just try this out.” I didn’t know it was going to lead to a career, a year or six months but I knew I definitely wanted to do more of it. It snowballed and continued on in that manner. I just kept doing it and kept wanting to do more of it. At some point I realized I really wanted to do it professionally. After having done a bunch of region theater, Summer Stock and small productions around the country, I kind of resolved and accepted that this is what I wanted to do on some level. I don’t know how long I want to do it for but so far I still want to do it!

It seems to be working out pretty well so far!

Yeah, I feel really, really lucky!

Was there anyone behind the scenes giving you the push you needed? Perhaps a mentor who had a big influence on you?

There have been many along the way. I feel like on almost every job I do, on some level, I find inspiration and example. One of my earliest was when I took a two-year Meisner acting technique class with a man named Ron Stetson. He teaches in New York City at the Neighborhood Playhouse. He really opened up the world of the craft and technique of acting to me. I still hold him in my heart as I travel through the business, thinking about the process and the craft. He was my first and maybe most powerful mentor from the craft point of view. Along the way, you meet directors, actors, writers and producers and they all have great stories and experiences to share. I have been really fortunate in working with many great people. Another one, one of the most inspirational directors I have worked with, was Peter Weir, who directed “The Truman Show.” He is unequivocally one of the great directors of our time, in addition to being an incredible man. He was quite inspirational to me, both as an actor and as an aspiring director.

We are together today to talk about one of your latest projects. How did you get involved with “Jane Got A Gun” and what attracted you to the role?

'Jane Got A Gun'

‘Jane Got A Gun’

I got involved because my close friend and colleague, Gavin O’Connor, came on as a director at the last minute to take the reigns of the film from someone else. He called me and said, “Hey, I am just jumping into this project in Santa Fe. It would be great if you could come down here and be a part of it.” That alone was enough to interest me, in a way. This is the fifth film I have made with him. As I mentioned, he is one of my closest friends, so working with him is always a great experience. I was just wrapping up the first season of “The Americans” when this call came in. I thought I was depleted, tired and needed a break but Gavin called and there it was. He needed me to get to Santa Fe within a matter of days. I read the script and thought it was really great. I thought, “I have never done a western and it is something I have been wanting to do. What a great cast!” I get to reunite with Natalie [Portman], who I worked with at the very beginning of my career in the movie “Beautiful Girls.” Everything about the project seemed irresistibly alluring, so I jumped on a plane and got to Santa Fe to start learning how to ride horses!

For what I heard about Gavin, he is known as an actor’s director. What does he bring to the table in that capacity?

Gavin is incredibly committed, passionate and authentic. He is really interested in finding the truth of the character, the truth of the context, the truth of the scene and the deeper, most underlying meanings of what we are doing. He is really in search of the more profound, deep meanings of the art, script and scenes. As a storyteller, I feel like it is visceral and you can feel that in his films. There is an authenticity and a passion that is rare and much appreciated. It is always a great process with Gavin and he is very open, available, communicative and collaborative. It just makes the whole thing a truly wonderful experience.

Natalie Portman and Noah Emmerich in 'Jane Got A Gun'

Natalie Portman and Noah Emmerich in ‘Jane Got A Gun’

What did you bring to this character that wasn’t on the written page?

Everything, I guess! [laughs] In some ways, on this particular character, nothing was on the written page. It was a very underwritten character, as he is mostly lying there in bed and dying for most of the movie. That was the great challenge of this role, to see if there were beats, feelings and emotions happening that we could communicate without much movement because the character is paralyzed and can’t really move. All he has is his face and his eyes, along with the camera work to show different layers and levels of feeling, emotion and reality. That was the exciting challenge of this role, the question of how much can you do within that constricted and limited context. I can’t speak for how it impacted the audience but hopefully we managed to have more colors there in the goings on than was apparent on the page.

Be it this role or any other, is there a process you undergo when taking on a new character?

Yeah, it is an ambiguous process and it is kind of hard to quantify or clarify but it is a journey into understanding a human being, what makes him tick, what matters, what is going on and what his life is. That is the great mystery and magical journey that actors take into their characters.

noah-emmerich-2-2016

I know this film was a difficult production for everyone involved. What was it about this project that made everyone band together to keep it on the rails?

I think Gavin, as our leader, is certainly primary. Adversity breeds intimacy in a way. When we were there, there were a lot of hurdles and a lot of things went wrong but everyone was passionate and committed to getting the film completed and having it come out as strong as possible. It was a beautiful place to shoot a movie and an incredible cast and crew. Everyone involved was putting everything they had into it. It was a very bonding, invigorating and challenging journey, that I think we are all grateful that we took.

I am sure you learn something on each project you work on. What did you walk away with after shooting this film?

Yeah! Never spend too much time at the backend of a horse! [laughs]

Words to live by, I’m sure! [laughs] Looking back at your career, how have you most evolved as an actor?

Gosh, I don’t know. Hopefully, I have just gotten better but I will leave that to you to judge! [laughs] Hopefully, I have gotten better at my work and deeper, richer and more able to convey the full humanity of the character.

Noah Emmerich

Noah Emmerich

You played an amazing range of diverse characters on stage, in film and on television. Is there something you are still anxious to tackle?

It’s funny, I was just talking about this. I hope to do more comedies. I really love doing comedies and I have very rare chances to be a participant in those, so I hope to be able to expand that genre in my own work. I love making and watching comedies. I think they are something that is evermore needed in the world today, so hopefully I can be more involved with making people laugh.

You can serve as a great inspiration to many young actors. What is the best lesson we can take away from your journey?

I would say the most important ingredient for an actor in this world is perseverance. Believe in your work, continue to hone and craft your work and just keep working. Don’t get too distracted by the career of it all. The career will sort itself out and the jobs will come or they won’t. All you can do is work inside your own craft, your own commitments and believe in what you are doing as a storyteller. Let the knocks slide off and let the rejections wash over you. Let the adversity not deter you from your own passion and commitment to being part of the storytelling world that we are all about.

One last question for you today, Noah. I always like to offer an opportunity to help shine a light on any causes you may lend your support to?

That is very nice. Right now, I am working with a group called Dream Yard (www.dreamyard.com). It is an arts education program in New York City. They recently got their own charter school up in The Bronx. It is all about arts education and early childhood and late childhood development. I think that is something we need to not lose sight of in this country — the value and impact that arts education can have on our youth. I am very, very involved with helping to make sure that stays an integral part of our educational and cultural value system.

Thank you so much for your time today, Noah. Keep up the great work! You are truly a pleasure to watch on screen!

Thanks so much, Jason!

‘Jane Got A Gun’ is available on Digital HD April 5th, 2016 and hit Blu-ray, DVD and On Demand April 26th, 2016.

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‘Jane Got A Gun’ Starring Natalie Portman And Joel Egerton Hits Blu-ray On April 26th

‘Jane Got A Gun’ Starring Natalie Portman And Joel Egerton Hits Blu-ray On April 26th

Academy Award© winner Natalie Portman (Black Swan, Star Wars Episodes I-III, The Professional) stars in Gavin O’Connor’s action-packed western Jane Got a Gun, available on Digital HD April 15 from Starz Digital, and on Blu-ray, DVD and On Demand from Anchor Bay Entertainment April 26. Hailed as a “sturdy, well-crafted genre piece” by the Los Angeles Times, Jane Got a Gun also stars Joel Edgerton (Black Mass, The Gift, The Great Gatsby), Ewan McGregor (August: Osage County, The Island), Rodrigo Santoro (Focus, 300: Rise of an Empire), Noah Emmerich (TV’s “The Americans”, Little Children), and Boyd Holbrook (Gone GirlRun All Night). The screenplay is written by Brian Duffield (Insurgent), Anthony Tambakis (Warrior) and Joel Edgerton, with story by Brian Duffield.

Jane Hammond (Natalie Portman) has built a life on the rugged western plains with her husband Bill “Ham” Hammond (Noah Emmerich) and young daughter. When Ham stumbles home riddled with bullets after a run-in with the relentless John Bishop (Ewan McGregor) and his gang, she knows they will not stop until her family is dead. In desperation, Jane turns to Dan Frost (Joel Edgerton), a man from her past, for help. Haunted by old memories, Jane’s past meets the present in a heart-stopping battle for survival.

Jane Got a Gun will be available on Blu-ray and DVD for the suggested retail price of $34.99 and $29.98.

To learn more about the film, please visit www.anchorbayentertainment.com.

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The 83rd Annual Academy Awards: And The Winners Are…

The 83rd Annual Academy Awards: And The Winners Are…

The 83rd Annual Academy Awards have once again come and gone. ‘The King’s Speech’ walked away with awards for Best Original Screenplay, Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Motion Picture. Other big winners of the night included Natalie Portman for ‘Black Swan’ and Melissa Leo and Christian Bale for ‘The Fighter.’ Check out the rest of the night’s winners below…

BEST PICTURE
127 Hours
Black Swan
The Fighter
Inception
The Kids Are All Right
WINNER: The King’s Speech
The Social Network
Toy Story 3
True Grit
Winter’s Bone

BEST ACTOR
Javier Bardem, Biutiful
Jeff Bridges, True Grit
Jesse Eisenberg, The Social Network
WINNER: Colin Firth, The King’s Speech
James Franco, 127 Hours

BEST ACTRESS
Annette Bening, The Kids Are All Right
Nicole Kidman, Rabbit Hole
Jennifer Lawrence, Winter’s Bone
WINNER: Natalie Portman, Black Swan
Michelle Williams, Blue Valentine

BEST DIRECTOR
Darren Aronofsky, Black Swan
Joel & Ethan Coen, True Grit
David Fincher, The Social Network
WINNER: Tom Hooper, The King’s Speech
David O. Russell, The Fighter

BEST SONG
“Coming Home,” Country Strong, Tom Douglas, Troy Verges and Hillary Lindsey
“I See the Light,” Tangled, Alan Menken, Glenn Slater
“If I Rise,” 127 Hours, A.R. Rahman, Dido, Rollo Armstrong
WINNER: “We Belong Together,” Toy Story 3, Randy Newman

BEST EDITING
127 Hours, Jon Harris
Black Swan, Andrew Weisblum
The Fighter, Pamela Martin
The King’s Speech, Tariq Anwar
WINNER: The Social Network, Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Alice in Wonderland, Ken Ralston, David Schaub, Carey Villegas and Sean Phillips
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 1, Tim Burke, John Richardson, Christian Manz and Nicolas Aithadi
Hereafter, Michael Owens, Bryan Grill, Stephan Trojanski and Joe Farrell
WINNER: Inception, Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Andrew Lockley and Peter Bebb
Iron Man 2, Janek Sirrs, Ben Snow, Ged Wright and Daniel Sudick

BEST DOCUMENTARY
Exit Through the Gift Shop, Banksy and Jaimie D’Cruz
Gasland, Josh Fox and Trish Adlesic
WINNER: Inside Job, Charles Ferguson and Audrey Marrs
Restrepo, Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger
Waste Land, Lucy Walker and Angus Aynley

BEST LIVE-ACTION SHORT
The Confession, Tanel Toom
The Crush, Michael Creagh
WINNER: God of Love, Luke Matheny
Na Wewe, Ivan Goldschmidt
Wish 143, Ian Barnes and Samantha Waite

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT
Killing in the Name (Nominees TBD)
Poster Girl (Nominees (TBD)
WINNER: Strangers No More, Karen Goodman and Kirk Simon
Sun Come Up, Jennifer Redfearn and Tim Metzger
The Warriors of Qiugang, Ruby Yang and Thomas Lenno

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
WINNER: Alice in Wonderland, Colleen Atwood
I Am Love, Antonella Cannarozzi
The King’s Speech, Jenny Beaven
The Tempest, Sandy Powell
True Grit, Mary Zophres

BEST MAKEUP
Barney’s Version, Adrien Morot
The Way Back, Eduoard F. Henriques, Gregory Funk, Yolanda Toussieng
WINNER: The Wolfman, Rick Baker and Dave Elsey

BEST SOUND EDITING
WINNER: Inception, Richard King
Toy Story 3, Tom Myers and Michael Silvers
TRON: Legacy, Gwendolyn Yates Whittle and Addison Teague
True Grit, Skip Lievsay and Craig Berkey
Unstoppable, Mark P. Stoeckinger

BEST SOUND MIXING
WINNER: Inception, Lora Hirschberg, Gary A. Rizzo, and Ed Novick
The King’s Speech, Paul Hamblin, Martin Jensen, and John Midgley
Salt, Jeffrey J. Haboush, Greg P. Russell, Scott Millan, and William Sarokin
The Social Network, Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick, and Mark Weingarten
True Grit, Skip Lievsay, Craig Berkey, Greg Orloff, and Peter F. Kurland

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
127 Hours, A.R. Rahman
How to Train Your Dragon, John Powell
Inception, Hans Zimmer
The King’s Speech, Alexandre Desplat
WINNER: The Social Network, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
WINNER: Christian Bale, The Fighter
John Hawkes, Winter’s Bone
Jeremy Renner, The Town
Mark Ruffalo, The Kids Are All Right
Geoffrey Rush, The King’s Speech

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Hors la Loi (Outside the Law) (Algeria)
Incendies (Canada)
WINNER: In a Better World (Denmark)
Dogtooth (Greece)
Biutiful (Mexico)

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Another Year, written by Mike Leigh
The Fighter, Screenplay by Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson; ?Story by Keith Dorrington & Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson
Inception, written by Christopher Nolan
The Kids Are All Right, written by Lisa Cholodenko & Stuart Blumberg
WINNER: The King’s Speech, Screenplay by David Seidler

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
127 Hours, Screenplay by Danny Boyle & Simon Beaufoy
WINNER: The Social Network, Screenplay by Aaron Sorkin
Toy Story 3, Screenplay by Michael Arndt; Story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich
True Grit, written for the screen by Joel Coen & Ethan Coen
Winter’s Bone, adapted for the screen by Debra Granik & Anne Rosellini

BEST ANIMATED FILM
How to Train Your Dragon
The Illusionist
WINNER: Toy Story 3

BEST ANIMATED SHORT
Day & Night, Teddy Newton
The Gruffalo, Jakob Schuh and Max Lang
Let’s Pollute, Geefwee Boedoe
WINNER: The Lost Thing, Shaun Tan and Andrew Ruhemann
Madagascar, Carnet de Voyage (Madagascar, a Journey Diary), Bastien Dubois

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy AdamsThe Fighter
Helena Bonham CarterThe King’s Speech
WINNER: Melissa Leo, The Fighter
Hailee SteinfeldTrue Grit
Jacki WeaverAnimal Kingdom trans Oscar Winners 2011 Full List   The Kings Speech Reigns!

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Black Swan, Matthew Libatique
WINNER: Inception, Wally Pfister
The King’s Speech, Danny Cohen
The Social Network, Jeff Cronenweth
True Grit, Roger Deakins trans Oscar Winners 2011 Full List   The Kings Speech Reigns!

BEST ART DIRECTION
WINNER: Alice in Wonderland, Robert Stromberg, Karen O’Hara
Happy Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 1, Stuart Craig, Stephenie McMillan
Inception, Guy Hendrix Dyas, Larry Dias, Doug Mowat
The King’s Speech, Eve Stewart, Judy Farr
True Grit, Jess Gonchor, Nancy Haigh

 

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Nominees For The 83rd Annual Academy Awards Revealed!

Nominees For The 83rd Annual Academy Awards Revealed!

The nominees for the 83rd Academy Awards were announced this morning. “The King’s Speech” led the field with 12 nominations, including nods for best picture and director, while “True Grit” followed with 10 nominations. “The Social Network” is up for a total of 7 nominations including a best picture nomination. Other entries in the best picture race include anticipated contenders “Black Swan,” “The Fighter,” “True Grit,” “Inception,” “The Kids Are All Right” and “Toy Story 3,” The dramas “127 Hours” and “Winter’s Bone” rounded out the field. The award show takes place February 27th.

Best Picture
“Black Swan,” Mike Medavoy, Brian Oliver and Scott Franklin, Producers
“The Fighter” David Hoberman, Todd Lieberman and Mark Wahlberg, Producers
“Inception,” Emma Thomas and Christopher Nolan, Producers
“The Kids Are All Right,” Gary Gilbert, Jeffrey Levy-Hinte and Celine Rattray, Producers
“The King’s Speech,” Iain Canning, Emile Sherman and Gareth Unwin, Producers
“127 Hours,” Christian Colson, Danny Boyle and John Smithson, Producers
“The Social Network,” Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca and Ceàn Chaffin, Producers
“Toy Story 3” Darla K. Anderson, Producer
“True Grit” Scott Rudin, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, Producers
“Winter’s Bone” Anne Rosellini and Alix Madigan-Yorkin, Producers

Actor in a Leading Role
Javier Bardem in “Biutiful”
Jeff Bridges in “True Grit”
Jesse Eisenberg in “The Social Network”
Colin Firth in “The King’s Speech”
James Franco in “127 Hours”

Actor in a Supporting Role
Christian Bale in “The Fighter”
John Hawkes in “Winter’s Bone”
Jeremy Renner in “The Town”
Mark Ruffalo in “The Kids Are All Right”
Geoffrey Rush in “The King’s Speech”

Actress in a Leading Role
Annette Bening in “The Kids Are All Right”
Nicole Kidman in “Rabbit Hole”
Jennifer Lawrence in “Winter’s Bone”
Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”
Michelle Williams in “Blue Valentine”

Actress in a Supporting Role
Amy Adams in “The Fighter”
Helena Bonham Carter in “The King’s Speech”
Melissa Leo in “The Fighter”
Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit”
Jacki Weaver in “Animal Kingdom”

Animated Feature Film
“How to Train Your Dragon” Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois
“The Illusionist” Sylvain Chomet
“Toy Story 3” Lee Unkrich

Art Direction
“Alice in Wonderland”
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1”
“Inception”
“The King’s Speech”
“True Grit”

Cinematography
“Black Swan,” Matthew Libatique
“Inception,” Wally Pfister
“The King’s Speech,” Danny Cohen
“The Social Network,” Jeff Cronenweth
“True Grit,” Roger Deakins

Costume Design
“Alice in Wonderland,” Colleen Atwood
“I Am Love,” Antonella Cannarozzi
“The King’s Speech,” Jenny Beavan
“The Tempest,” Sandy Powell
“True Grit” Mary Zophres

Directing
“Black Swan,” Darren Aronofsky
“The Fighter,” David O. Russell
“The King’s Speech,” Tom Hooper
“The Social Network,” David Fincher
“True Grit,” Joel Coen and Ethan Coen

Documentary (Feature)
“Exit through the Gift Shop,” Banksy and Jaimie D’Cruz
“Gasland,” Josh Fox and Trish Adlesic
“Inside Job,” Charles Ferguson and Audrey Marrs
“Restrepo,” Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger
“Waste Land,” Lucy Walker and Angus Aynsley

Documentary (Short Subject)
“Killing in the Name”
“Poster Girl”
“Strangers No More”
“Sun Come Up”
“The Warriors of Qiugang”

Film Editing
“Black Swan”
“The Fighter”
“The King’s Speech”
“127 Hours”
“The Social Network”

Foreign Language Film
“Biutiful,” Mexico
“Dogtooth,” Greece
“In a Better World,” Denmark
“Incendies,” Canada
“Outside the Law (Hors-la-loi),” Algeria

Makeup
“Barney’s Version,” Adrien Morot
“The Way Back,” Edouard F. Henriques, Gregory Funk and Yolanda Toussieng
“The Wolfman,” Rick Baker and Dave Elsey

Music (Original Score)
“How to Train Your Dragon,” John Powell
“Inception,” Hans Zimmer
“The King’s Speech,” Alexandre Desplat
“127 Hours,” A.R. Rahman
“The Social Network,” Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross

Music (Original Song)
“Coming Home” from “Country Strong,” Music and Lyric by Tom Douglas, Troy Verges and Hillary Lindsey
“I See the Light” from “Tangled,” Music by Alan Menken Lyric by Glenn Slater
“If I Rise” from “127 Hours,” Music by A.R. Rahman Lyric by Dido and Rollo Armstrong
“We Belong Together” from “Toy Story 3,” Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

Short Film (Animated)
“Day & Night,” Teddy Newton
“The Gruffalo,” Jakob Schuh and Max Lang
“Let’s Pollute,” Geefwee Boedoe
“The Lost Thing,” Shaun Tan and Andrew Ruhemann
“Madagascar, carnet de voyage (Madagascar, a Journey Diary)” Bastien Dubois

Short Film (Live Action)
“The Confession,” Tanel Toom
“The Crush,” Michael Creagh
“God of Love,” Luke Matheny
“Na Wewe,” Ivan Goldschmidt
“Wish 143,” Ian Barnes and Samantha Waite

Sound Editing
“Inception,” Richard King
“Toy Story 3,” Tom Myers and Michael Silvers
“Tron: Legacy,” Gwendolyn Yates Whittle and Addison Teague
“True Grit,” Skip Lievsay and Craig Berkey
“Unstoppable,” Mark P. Stoeckinger

Sound Mixing
“Inception,” Lora Hirschberg, Gary A. Rizzo and Ed Novick
“The King’s Speech,” Paul Hamblin, Martin Jensen and John Midgley
“Salt,” Jeffrey J. Haboush, Greg P. Russell, Scott Millan and William Sarokin
“The Social Network,” Ren Klyce, David Parker, Michael Semanick and Mark Weingarten
“True Grit,” Skip Lievsay, Craig Berkey, Greg Orloff and Peter F. Kurland

Visual Effects
“Alice in Wonderland,” Ken Ralston, David Schaub, Carey Villegas and Sean Phillips
“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1,” Tim Burke, John Richardson, Christian Manz and Nicolas Aithadi
“Hereafter,” Michael Owens, Bryan Grill, Stephan Trojanski and Joe Farrell
“Inception,” Paul Franklin, Chris Corbould, Andrew Lockley and Peter Bebb
“Iron Man 2,” Janek Sirrs, Ben Snow, Ged Wright and Daniel Sudick

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)
“127 Hours,” Screenplay by Danny Boyle & Simon Beaufoy
“The Social Network,” Screenplay by Aaron Sorkin
“Toy Story 3,” Screenplay by Michael Arndt; Story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich
“True Grit,” Written for the screen by Joel Coen & Ethan Coen
“Winter’s Bone,” Adapted for the screen by Debra Granik & Anne Rosellini

Writing (Original Screenplay)
“Another Year,” Written by Mike Leigh
“The Fighter,” Screenplay by Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson; Story by Keith Dorrington & Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson
“Inception,” Written by Christopher Nolan
“The Kids Are All Right,” Written by Lisa Cholodenko & Stuart Blumberg
“The King’s Speech,” Screenplay by David Seidler

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The 16th Annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards: Nominees Announced!

The 16th Annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards: Nominees Announced!

The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) has announced the nominees for the 16th annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards. The winners will be announced at the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards ceremony on Friday, January 14, 2011 at 9:00 PM ET/PT.

This year’s event will again take place at the Hollywood Palladium. This is the fourth year in a row that VH1 will broadcast the gala live on the network and the first year the show will also be broadcast internationally.

“Black Swan” received an unprecedented 12 nominations for the 16th annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards, garnering nods for Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, Best Cinematography, Best Art Direction, Best Editing, Best Costume Design, Best Makeup, Best Sound and Best Score. “True Grit” and “The King’s Speech” followed close behind with 11 nominations each, while “Inception” received 10 nominations and “The Social Network” garnered 9.

“Toy Story 3” was honored in the Best Picture and Best Animated Feature categories while two Best Picture nominees, “Inception” and “The Town,” were also recognized in the Best Action Movie category. “127 Hours,” “The Fighter” and “Winter’s Bone” also scored multiple nominations, including Best Picture.

Nicole Kidman received her record seventh acting nomination for Best Actress in “Rabbit Hole.” She won the first Critics’ Choice Award as Best Actress 15 years ago for “To Die For.” Later Kidman was nominated for Best Actress in “Cold Mountain,” “The Hours” and “Moulin Rouge,” in addition to being part of the nominated Acting Ensembles in “Nine” and “The Hours.”

Amy Adams will be seeking her second Critics’ Choice Award as a Best Supporting Actress nominee in “The Fighter.” Adams previously won the category for “Junebug” and has received three other nods from the BFCA, including one for Best Actress in “Enchanted.”

Twenty-year-old Jennifer Lawrence earned nods in both the Best Actress and Best Young Actor/Actress categories, among the four nominations for “Winter’s Bone,” while fourteen-year-old Hailee Steinfeld earned nods as both Best Supporting Actress and Best Young Actor/Actress for “True Grit,” contributing to its 11 nominations. Thirteen-year-old Chloe Grace Moretz was nominated in the Best Young Actor/Actress category twice for “Let Me In” and “Kick-Ass.”

Brothers Joel and Ethan Coen continue to be Critics’ Choice favorites, nominated jointly for Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay for “True Grit.” Previously they had shared Best Director honors for “No Country For Old Men,” and were nominated as writers of “The Man Who Wasn’t There,” “A Serious Man” and “No Country For Old Men.” “No Country For Old Men” and “Fargo” also won Critics’ Choice Awards as Best Picture.

The 250 members of the BFCA, the largest film critics’ organization in the United States and Canada, representing television, radio and online critics, selected nominees in each of 25 categories. The awards are bestowed annually to honor the finest in cinematic achievement. Eligible films were released in 2010. The accounting firm of Gregory A. Mogab tallied the written ballots.

Historically, the Critics’ Choice Movie Awards are the most accurate predictor of the Academy Award nominations. All four major acting category winners at the Academy Awards in 2010 were first Critics’ Choice Movie Awards winners in the same categories and were present at the January 15, 2010 ceremony to graciously give their first acceptance speeches of the awards season. The BFCA also recognized “The Hurt Locker” for Best Picture and Kathryn Bigelow as Best Director, making her the first female to win the award. “The Hurt Locker” and Bigelow also went on to win the Academy Award for Best Picture and Best Director, but were both overlooked at the Golden Globes.

Today, VH1 also announces the launch of its Critics’ Choice Movie Awards site at CriticsChoice.VH1.com. The site offers movie fans detailed information about the show and this year’s nominees, VH1.com’s Award Season Twitter Tracker, where users can see the awards show buzz that’s happening on Twitter in real time, and Quick Critic, an opportunity to share short film reviews for a prize that includes a trip for two to next year’s Critics’ Choice Movie Awards. Additionally, interviews with many of the acting nominees can be found on the BFCA’s site CriticsChoice.com.

NOMINATIONS FOR THE 16th ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE MOVIE AWARDS:


BEST PICTURE

127 Hours
Black Swan
The Fighter
Inception
The King’s Speech
The Social Network
The Town
Toy Story 3
True Grit
Winter’s Bone

BEST ACTOR
Jeff Bridges – “True Grit”
Robert Duvall – “Get Low”
Jesse Eisenberg – “The Social Network”
Colin Firth – “The King’s Speech”
James Franco – “127 Hours”
Ryan Gosling – “Blue Valentine”

BEST ACTRESS
Annette Bening – “The Kids Are All Right”
Nicole Kidman – “Rabbit Hole”
Jennifer Lawrence – “Winter’s Bone”
Natalie Portman – “Black Swan”
Noomi Rapace – “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo”
Michelle Williams – “Blue Valentine”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Christian Bale – “The Fighter”
Andrew Garfield – “The Social Network”
Jeremy Renner – “The Town”
Sam Rockwell – “Conviction”
Mark Ruffalo – “The Kids Are All Right”
Geoffrey Rush – “The King’s Speech”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams – “The Fighter”
Helena Bonham Carter – “The King’s Speech”
Mila Kunis – “Black Swan”
Melissa Leo – “The Fighter”
Hailee Steinfeld – “True Grit”
Jacki Weaver – “Animal Kingdom”

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS
Elle Fanning – “Somewhere”
Jennifer Lawrence – “Winter’s Bone”
Chloe Grace Moretz – “Let Me In”
Chloe Grace Moretz – “Kick-Ass”
Kodi Smit-McPhee – “Let Me In”
Hailee Steinfeld – “True Grit”

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE
The Fighter
The Kids Are All Right
The King’s Speech
The Social Network
The Town

BEST DIRECTOR
Darren Aronofsky – “Black Swan”
Danny Boyle – “127 Hours”
Joel Coen & Ethan Coen – “True Grit”
David Fincher – “The Social Network”
Tom Hooper – “The King’s Speech”
Christopher Nolan – “Inception”

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
“Another Year” – Mike Leigh
“Black Swan” – Mark Heyman and Andres Heinz and John McLaughlin
“The Fighter” – Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson (Story by Keith Dorrington & Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson)
“Inception” – Christopher Nolan
“The Kids Are All Right” – Lisa Cholodenko and Stuart Blumberg
“The King’s Speech” – David Seidler

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
“127 Hours” – Simon Beaufoy and Danny Boyle
“The Social Network” – Aaron Sorkin
“The Town” – Ben Affleck, Peter Craig and Sheldon Turner
“Toy Story 3” – Michael Arndt (Story by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich)
“True Grit” – Joel Coen & Ethan Coen
“Winter’s Bone” – Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
“127 Hours” – Anthony Dod Mantle
“Black Swan” – Matthew Libatique
“Inception” – Wally Pfister
“The King’s Speech” – Danny Cohen
“True Grit” – Roger Deakins

BEST ART DIRECTION
“Alice in Wonderland” – Stefan Dechant
“Black Swan” – Therese DePrez and Tora Peterson
“Inception” – Guy Hendrix Dyas
“The King’s Speech” – Netty Chapman
“True Grit” – Jess Gonchor and Nancy Haigh

BEST EDITING
“127 Hours” – Jon Harris
“Black Swan” – Andrew Weisblum
“Inception” – Lee Smith
“The Social Network” – Angus Wall and Kirk Baxter

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
“Alice in Wonderland” – Colleen Atwood
“Black Swan” – Amy Westcott
“The King’s Speech” – Jenny Beavan
“True Grit” – Mary Zophres

BEST MAKEUP
Alice in Wonderland
Black Swan
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1
True Grit

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Alice in Wonderland
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1
Inception
Tron: Legacy

BEST SOUND
127 Hours
Black Swan
Inception
The Social Network
Toy Story 3

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Despicable Me
How to Train Your Dragon
The Illusionist
Tangled
Toy Story 3

BEST ACTION MOVIE
Inception
Kick-Ass
Red
The Town
Unstoppable

BEST COMEDY
Cyrus
Date Night
Easy A
Get Him to the Greek
I Love You Phillip Morris
The Other Guys

BEST PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION
The Pacific
Temple Grandin
You Don’t Know Jack

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Biutiful
I Am Love
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Exit Through the Gift Shop
Inside Job
Restrepo
Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work
The Tillman Story
Waiting for Superman

BEST SONG
“I See the Light” – performed by Mandy Moore & Zachary Levi/written by Alan Menken & Glenn Slater – Tangled
“If I Rise” – performed by Dido and A.R. Rahman/music by A.R. Rahman/lyrics by Dido Armstrong and Rollo Armstrong – 127 Hours
“Shine” – performed and written by John Legend – Waiting for Superman
“We Belong Together” – performed and written by Randy Newman – Toy Story 3
“You Haven’t Seen the Last of Me Yet” – performed by Cher/written by Diane Warren – Burlesque

BEST SCORE
“Black Swan” – Clint Mansell
“Inception” – Hans Zimmer
“The King’s Speech” – Alexandre Desplat
“The Social Network” – Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
“True Grit” – Carter Burwell
NOMINEES BY PICTURE FOR
THE 16th ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE MOVIE AWARDS

127 HOURS – 8 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Actor/James Franco
Best Director/Danny Boyle
Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Cinematography
Best Editing
Best Sound
Best Song/”If I Rise”

ALICE IN WONDERLAND – 4 Nominations
Best Art Direction
Best Costume Design
Best Makeup
Best Visual Effects

ANIMAL KINGDON – 1 Nomination
Best Supporting Actress/Jacki Weaver

ANOTHER YEAR – 1 Nomination
Best Original Screenplay

BIUTIFUL – 1 Nomination
Best Foreign Language Film

BLACK SWAN – 12 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Actress/Natalie Portman
Best Supporting Actress/Mila Kunis
Best Director/Darren Aronofsky
Best Original Screenplay
Best Cinematography
Best Art Direction
Best Editing
Best Costume Design
Best Makeup
Best Sound
Best Score

BLUE VALENTINE – 2 Nominations
Best Actor/Ryan Gosling
Best Actress/Michelle Williams

BURLESQUE – 1 Nomination
Best Song/”You Haven’t Seen the Last of Me Yet”

CONVICTION – 1 Nomination
Best Supporting Actor/Sam Rockwell

CYRUS – 1 Nomination
Best Comedy

DATE NIGHT – 1 Nomination
Best Comedy

DESPICABLE ME – 1 Nomination
Best Animated Feature

EASY A – 1 Nomination
Best Comedy

EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP – 1 Nomination
Best Documentary Feature

GET HIM TO THE GREEK – 1 Nomination
Best Comedy

GET LOW – 1 Nomination
Best Actor/Robert Duvall

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1 – 2 Nominations
Best Makeup
Best Visual Effects

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON – 1 Nomination
Best Animated Feature

I AM LOVE – 1 Nomination
Best Foreign Language Film

I LOVE YOU PHILLIP MORRIS – 1 Nomination
Best Comedy

INCEPTION – 10 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Director/Christopher Nolan
Best Original Screenplay
Best Cinematography
Best Art Direction
Best Editing
Best Visual Effects
Best Sound
Best Action Movie
Best Score

INSIDE JOB – 1 Nomination
Best Documentary Feature

JOAN RIVERS: A PIECE OF WORK – 1 Nomination
Best Documentary Feature

KICK-ASS – 2 Nominations
Best Young Actress/Chloe Grace Moretz
Best Action Movie

LET ME IN – 2 Nominations
Best Young Actress/Chloe Grace Moretz
Best Young Actor/Kodi Smit-McPhee

RABBIT HOLE – 1 Nomination
Best Actress/Nicole Kidman

RED – 1 Nomination
Best Action Movie

RESTREPO – 1 Nomination
Best Documentary Feature

SOMEWHERE – 1 Nomination
Best Young Actor/Actress/Elle Fanning

TANGLED – 2 Nominations
Best Animated Feature
Best Song/”I See the Light”

TEMPLE GRANDIN – 1 Nomination
Best Picture Made for Television

THE FIGHTER – 6 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Supporting Actor/Christian Bale
Best Supporting Actress/Amy Adams
Best Supporting Actress/Melissa Leo
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Original Screenplay

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO – 2 Nominations
Best Actress/Noomi Rapace
Best Foreign Language Film

THE ILLUSIONIST – 1 Nomination
Best Animated Feature

THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT – 4 Nominations
Best Actress/Annette Bening
Best Supporting Actor/Mark Ruffalo
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Original Screenplay

THE KING’S SPEECH – 11 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Actor/Colin Firth
Best Supporting Actor/Geoffrey Rush
Best Supporting Actress/Helena Bonham Carter
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Director/Tom Hooper
Best Original Screenplay
Best Cinematography
Best Art Direction
Best Costume Design
Best Score

THE OTHER GUYS – 1 Nomination
Best Comedy

THE PACIFIC – 1 Nomination
Best Picture Made for Television

THE SOCIAL NETWORK – 9 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Actor/Jesse Eisenberg
Best Supporting Actor/Andrew Garfield
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Director/David Fincher
Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Editing
Best Sound
Best Score

THE TILLMAN STORY – 1 Nomination
Best Documentary Feature

THE TOWN – 5 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Supporting Actor/Jeremy Renner
Best Acting Ensemble
Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Action Movie

TOY STORY 3 – 5 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Sound
Best Animated Feature
Best Song/”We Belong Together”

TRON: LEGACY – 1 Nomination
Best Visual Effects

TRUE GRIT – 11 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Actor/Jeff Bridges
Best Supporting Actress/Hailee Steinfeld
Best Young Actress/Hailee Steinfeld
Best Director/ Joel Coen & Ethan Coen
Best Adapted Screenplay
Best Cinematography
Best Art Direction
Best Costume Design
Best Makeup
Best Score

UNSTOPPABLE – 1 Nomination
Best Action Movie

WAITING FOR SUPERMAN – 2 Nominations
Best Documentary Feature
Best Song/”Shine”

WINTER’S BONE – 4 Nominations
Best Picture
Best Actress/Jennifer Lawrence
Best Young Actress/Jennifer Lawrence
Best Adapted Screenplay

YOU DON’T KNOW JACK – 1 Nomination
Best Picture Made for Television

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New International Poster For Darren Aronokfsky’s ‘Black Swan’

New International Poster For Darren Aronokfsky’s ‘Black Swan’

Darren Aronokfsky’s Black Swan,which stars stars Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis, is creating quite a buzz, in addition to an expanded release over the next few weeks. Check out a brand new international poster for the film below that features the lovely Natalie Portman.

Synopsis: BLACK SWAN follows the story of Nina (Portman), a ballerina in a New York City ballet company whose life, like all those in her profession, is completely consumed with dance. She lives with her retired ballerina mother Erica (Barbara Hershey) who zealously supports her daughter’s professional ambition. When artistic director Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel) decides to replace prima ballerina Beth MacIntyre (Winona Ryder) for the opening production of their new season, Swan Lake, Nina is his first choice. But Nina has competition: a new dancer, Lily (Kunis), who impresses Leroy as well. Swan Lake requires a dancer who can play both the White Swan with innocence and grace, and the Black Swan, who represents guile and sensuality. Nina fits the White Swan role perfectly but Lily is the personification of the Black Swan. As the two young dancers expand their rivalry into a twisted friendship, Nina begins to get more in touch with her dark side with a recklessness that threatens to destroy her.

Source: Glamour UK

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