Tag Archive | "Nita Strauss"

THE NEW NORMAL: Kane Roberts On Breathing Life Into His Incredible New Album!

THE NEW NORMAL: Kane Roberts On Breathing Life Into His Incredible New Album!

Legendary guitarist Kane Roberts’ is an unstoppable force in rock music.

Of the iconic images of the ‘80s in rock n roll, one that stood the test of time is Alice Cooper’s then-Rambo-looking guitar player shooting fires on the crowds from his M-80 shaped guitar. That guitar player was none other than Kane Roberts: an accomplished musician and singer, who went on to record four solo albums (including the “Phoenix Down” project released on the Frontiers label in the late ‘90s). Kane’s name and abilities came to prominence on Alice Cooper’s “Constrictor” album, which was followed by his self-titled debut solo album in 1987. More albums and tours with Alice followed, making Kane a well-known face in the business especially for his guitar skills, his body-builder image and iconic machine-gun guitar.

As a solo recording artist, he landed a few Top 40 hits and his varied musical background includes recording, writing and touring with artists such as Rod Stewart, Alice Cooper, Desmond Child, KISS, Diane Warren, Alice in Chains, Berlin, Guns N’ Roses and Garland Jeffries. He also wrote or recorded music for films like “Light Sleeper,” “Penelope Spheeris’ Decline of Western Civilization,” “Friday the 13th IV Jason Lives” and “John Carpenter’s Prince of Darkness.” In 1991, his second solo album, “Saints and Sinners” for Geffen Records included the Top 40 Billboard hit “Does Anybody Really Fall In Love Anymore,” originally written by Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora.

Kane is back with a new album and this time he made it special by involving amazing friends including Alice Cooper guesting on lead vocals in the main video/single “Beginning of the End” together with Alissa White-Gluz (of Arch Enemy). The song also features an appearance from Babymetal powerhouse drummer Aoyama Hideki. Kane also reunited his former Alice Cooper bandmates Kip Winger, Paul Taylor and Ken Mary on the album opener “Above and Beyond.” Other guest appearances include Nita Strauss (current Alice Cooper guitarist) appearing on lead guitar on “King of the World” and Lzzy Hale (of Halestorm) co-write on “The Lion’s Share.”

Three years in the making, “The New Normal” offers a unique artist ready to get back in the spotlight. Absolutely not to be missed, Kane melts the old and new in metal in an outstanding album. Enjoy it with open mind and get ready to be blown away! Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with the legendary Kane Roberts to discuss his life in music, fueling his creative fire and breathing life into his epic new album, ‘The New Normal.’ 

You created a tremendous career in the music industry. How did music come into your life and begin to take hold?

For me, as a kid, I started finding music like Jimi Hendrix and Jimmy Page, anybody named Jimmy actually! [laughs] No, no, I’m kidding but it was Led Zeppelin and bands like that. I became instantly obsessed with the guitar. It was one of those things! My parents got me this big, heavy Kay guitar. People who play guitar know these things, but it weighed like 50 lbs. and I was trying to deal with it! [laughs] As time went on, it took over my life. I ended up getting into a regular college, but I ended up quitting and going to the New England Conservatory of Music. Shortly after that, I ended up moving from Boston to Manhattan and that’s where Alice Cooper and his organization heard my music. They came in and saw me play without telling me. I ended up going to their office in Manhattan and meeting Bob Ezrin, Shep Gordon and Alice. I got this real sense that I was standing in front of people that changed the culture of the world. They shocked the world with their music, imagery and the messages that they put out. I got a sense that I was standing in the presence of history-makers. To be honest, I don’t get nervous in situations like that and I was fully jazzed about it. One of the reasons that Alice and I still continue as friends today, this is true, is because during that meeting, literally within 10 to 15 minutes, he and I became best friends. We’ve talked about that before. It’s almost like we knew each other before. It’s one of the reasons why my career kept rolling along because I ended up being managed by Shep and all that stuff. That is the quick, “Reader’s Digest” version of how I got into music.

Kane Roberts is just getting warmed up!

What went into finding your creative voice as a player?

I think people are born attracted to different things. For example, I’ve always loved visuals and movies with soundtracks. I was always very aware of the music. When I heard some of these bands, I started visualizing myself playing or in the different situations the lyrics were singing about. It came to a point where it completely took over my life. One of the things that happened was that when I picked up my guitar, I started getting the gratification of, “For those 2 seconds I sounded a little bit like Jimmy Page” or whoever the guitar player was. That immediate gratification and sense of visualizing myself playing on a big stage became my food or nutrition. It was what I needed to get through the day! I was lucky. I speak to some people and I say, “What do you want to do with your life?” They say, “Jeez, I don’t really know.” I kinda knew at a very young age. I was 10 or 12 years old and I realized music felt so good to me. I became obsessed with listening to all types of music, which is something I still do today. I listen to the stuff from my past and my roots. I listen to jazz. I listen to a type of music from Japan called Enka, which is a type of traditional music. I also listen to a lot of the new metal that is out there; bands like Ghost, Volbeat and Lacuna Coil. I’m always absorbing stuff! As that happened, like I said, I went to a normal university, but I knew this wasn’t the right place for me. Ultimately, I ended up at a music school, which I think was the beginning of learning about all of the discipline it took and how you must focus your brain on stuff.

What lessons did you learn early on that impacted your career trajectory?

As musicians, we always think about the music industry. “Is it good? Is it as good as it used to be? Is it better?” My personal opinion is that none of that stuff matters. In many ways, the music industry is better for you today than it has ever been. Back in the day, once you got a record deal, you walked into this huge machine and you were taken out of a lot of the process. In some ways that’s good because you say, “Oh, they’re going to take care of this. They’re gonna take care of that. They’re gonna do all the promotional stuff and whatever.” Today, you have to do stuff yourself. You have to work YouTube and the social networks. The one rule I learned back in the day was that if you become great, the world will beat a path to your door. You have to believe that! You have to believe that there is some sort of a system that is in the universe that has some sort of sense, not of justice, but that if you are doing great things people will notice. Music is a very human activity and it involves other people. There was one point, when I was practicing, that I went up to this really remote location in Maine. All I did was practice. I was working at this ballroom and I just practiced all day and night, as a kid. I was 19 years old and that was all I did. When I came back and I walked back into the jet stream of my friends and everything, it was difficult for me because I had done such a solitary thing for so long. I learned that it involves other people. You always have to have the sense that if you are doing something great, that there is going to be somebody in the audience that will notice. I remember one of Motley Crue’s managers, Doug Thaler, came to see my band play. We had met very early on in my career. We had sold out a 200-seat club, which is pretty small. I said, “Jeez, I hope that someday we can sell out bigger venues.” He said, “If you can sell out a 200-seat place, you can sell out an arena. It’s just the matter of getting your music out there and getting the right opportunities.” That’s the part that’s a little difficult. How do you get face time with the people who are going to push you into the right zone? That means you just have to be obsessed and get out there and do everything you that you can. There is the 10,000-hour rule, where you hit 10,000 hours, you can pretty much do anything you want in terms of practicing.

You have an incredible work ethic and it’s served you well. Was that instilled in you or something you developed over time?

It might have been stuff that maybe my parents instilled in me; the idea that you have to work to get things. One thing that I have shared with Alice and something we have talked about is how people always talk about how bad it is to be obsessed with things. Well, I think it’s a good thing! What kind of balance are you looking for in your life? For example, you’re a writer. This is what you do for your creative push out there in the world. The times that you are obsessed with it and it’s all you can do, that’s when you get the system going of getting better, learning and evolving. I think that is what happened with me. Like I said, music became my drug so to speak. It became my recreation, my fun, my hobby, my work and my future. I was just lucky to start perceiving it that way somewhere in my teens and later teens especially. As soon as I ended up with Alice Cooper, got out on stage and was doing all that sort of stuff, that is when I began to learn about the real world. I was lucky to keep that sort of vertical curve going but I never felt like it was too much work. I never felt like, “Jeez, I need to take a break.” In another sense, I was one of those guys who never wanted the tour to end. Everybody else wanted to go home but I could’ve been out there nonstop for 10 years and it would have been great!

How have you evolved over the course of your career?

I started listening to other people and a lot of times I was copying what they were doing. I would write a song and it might be similar to a Van Halen song or whatever. You rely on your roots, whether it’s bands from the past, blues or whatever. That stuff will have its way with you but as time goes on you begin to change. One of the things that’s really critical when you’re writing, practicing or soloing, is knowing that Mr. Mediocre is sitting right next to you saying, “Just do this easy thing that you always do.” You have to push that guy away and that helps you get closer to the envelope you are trying to push. For example, when I was recording this new album, I decided not to take the easy road and not to do the expected thing. It wasn’t an effort to walk away from my roots but a matter of being really honest with stuff.

There is another thing that, I think, is a very strange phenomenon. Whatever it is you do creatively, if you say to yourself, “I’m going to stop … ” and you stop. Now, I didn’t do this, but let’s say I did. Let’s say I stopped, walked away from it and in 10 years I picked it up again. In that 10-year period, I still evolved as a musician because who you creatively absorbs the things you see during the day, the people that you meet, emotions that you feel and girls who you fall in love with or get your heart broken by. All of that stuff is absorbed along with the music that you hear. It changes you as an artist. If you start getting your chops back together, your technique and skill, you’re going to be a different musician. I think once you start pushing the creative boulder, at whatever age that is, it’s going to keep rolling to a certain degree. Maybe your skills won’t, if you walk away, but you will keep moving in some direction because it encompasses every aspect of your life. The thing is with me that I have evolved as an artist and writer.

I’m still writing a little bit, I was playing a lot of guitar and singing a bit, but I wasn’t doing anything in the public jet stream. When I sat down and started this record, I had changed! I had been listening to so many different things and the things that I gravitated towards were different and we were noticing that! This album actually took me three years. It’s because, after six months, I would listen back to what I was doing and say, “Jeez, ya know, I’m singing a lot better now. My instinct is to do this, but this other thing has emerged. Let’s re-record that vocal!” I was lucky to be in the studio where I had a chance to do that. I also had a record company that said it’s okay to take three years, which was pretty incredible! [laughs]

Kane Roberts’ ‘The New Normal’ is available now via Frontiers Records.

Tell us more about your vision for this album, “The New Normal,” as you entered into the creative process.

I didn’t want to do anything proactive. In other words, I didn’t want to say, “I want this record to appeal to this crowd. I want to make sure that I don’t sound like this anymore … .” or “I want to sound this way or that way.” I had to sit down and do things that I like. I was really fortunate to be working with my co-producer, Alex Track. He’s also a musician, so we would create something and then just go on instinct. Our first run at the songs were all just what we like, and it was that kind of a thing. Then, we would start to structure the songs and give more of a substantive feel and make the structure a little bit more interesting. We started thinking that each song could be like a script to a movie. We thought of the whole piece in a very cinematic sense, which is calling back on that visual sense that I have. We’re actually putting together a video for one of the songs, “Beginning of The End,” which features Alice Cooper and Alissa White-Gluz. I was actually able to get Alissa and Alice in the same location to shoot the video, which was a miracle unto itself! [laughs] My point is that we decided not to do a performance video. We wanted to make it a series of visuals that had a sort of obtuse narrative to it, where people can write their own script to it visually. It’s kinda the way we felt with the whole record. The messaging on the record is a little different than the normal thing of, “I met a girl and she broke my heart.” It’s not in that realm. It’s got more of a, for lack of a better word, modern approach to the way the world is. That’s why I called the album, “The New Normal.” On the cover, you see this girl with tattoos all over her and she’s wearing this insane mask and everything. If you saw that image 30 years ago, it would’ve completely shocked you! Today, you’re looking at it and going, “Ya know, I’ve seen that before.” So, there is the new normal, ya know?! [laughs]

I’m glad you mentioned the cinematic aspect of the album because having listened to it at length, that stood out to me.

I wanted the songs to almost sound conversational in the lyrics. “Beginning of the End,” once you get Alice Cooper into it, it turns into some really bizarre, crazy, horror movie, shock sorta thing because Alice is so dominant. However, a lot of the other songs are dealing with how we feel about life and those thoughts that are in our heads and spoken in a more current way, as opposed to what was being done before in rock. I’m not the only one doing it, I’m just saying that’s the approach that I took, so I’m glad you noticed!

As you mentioned, you have tremendously talented people involved on this album. What did they bring out in you creatively?

Take a guy like Kip Winger for example. He’s someone I knew from Alice’s band and, of course, we remained friends. He’s still prolific! He’s got his solo thing and still touring and recording with Winger. He also got the Grammy nomination for classical music. He’s someone who is really on fire still, when it comes to playing. The same thing is true with Ken Mary, who is playing with Flotsam & Jetsam now. That’s not an easy ride on the drums, ya know! [laughs] He’s killing it! I wanted people whose standard was so high that I had to step up and meet the standard. I knew I would get great stuff from them. If the foundation of what I am doing is on that high of a level, it’s only going to help me! I called up Nita Strauss. She was the first person I called because I wanted to go back and forth on a guitar solo. The song is called “King of The World.” When she plays that first riff, that’s some serious ball-clanging shredding going on there! I was amazed and I thought to myself, “I’ve got to get my fuckin’ act together!” It woke me up, ya know! She’s playing so good that I have to play good as well too because she’s such an amazing artist. So, I pulled in people who were doing something different. Alissa and Nita are both knocking down walls and shattering glass ceilings all over the place! With Alissa, Arch Enemy walks out on stage and it’s these big guys playing this massive metal and suddenly Alissa walks out there and owns the audience and owns the stage! It’s just an unexpected thing but it pushes us into thinking about the world a little differently. They’re both really dedicated, serious, professional artists. I really lucked out across the board!

Kane Roberts, Alice Cooper and Alissa White-Gluz.

Where do you see this project headed in the near future?

Right now, I’m into a video mindset, as opposed to touring. The touring thing requires an amount of response to the record, it’s that sort of a thing. It requires a certain way to view how many people I can reach. Right now, I want to do a series of three to five videos. That’s my first thing to make this thing a visual and audio project for people. We purposely recorded this stuff, so it had moments of cinematic atmosphere, like I said. I’m really going to concentrate on that to start and if it seems to be a viable enterprise or something I ought to do, I will go through the hard work of putting together a killer band and do some live shows as well.

Bringing “The New Normal” to life has been a big part of your life for the past three years. What was the biggest challenge along the way?

The biggest challenge was the unknown. I always relish that! There is a song called “Leave Me In The Dark” on this album and it’s about the things that we don’t know. I didn’t know what to expect in a lot of ways, but I was very hungry for it because from what we don’t know, from the dark, that’s where faith emerges. In other words, if it’s completely dark and you take a step, you’re thinking, “There’s gotta be floor there or something!” At least that’s your hope! So, you take the step! I’m not talking about this in a religious sense, although that works for some people. I’m talking about real self-discovery as you move forward in this world. At the end of the day, when I finished the record, I was really pleased with the whole process! You think about it and five days a week, five nights a week for three years and I put together this video with Alice and Alissa — I really got into it! It’s one of those things where I was spitting blood to get this stuff out there! [laughs] I hope everyone appreciates it but putting this stuff out into the public jet stream, like I said, there are going to be haters and lovers and everything in between but I look at it as being all good!

You invested a lot of time on this over the past three years. What is your focus now that you have those days and nights open! [laughs]

Ya know, I don’t know if I’m going to do another project. What I think is that if I can fill my days and nights with developing these videos and watching the response, that might influence what the creative process might be moving forward. I’m already mapping out the second video while we’re producing this one. I think that’s how this project will fill my days and nights over the next year or so!

Kane Roberts in the wild.

That’s awesome! We are just scratching the surface of your life in music. What is the biggest lesson we can take from your journey as an artist?

I think it goes back a little bit to what I said before. If you find yourself thinking, “I don’t know what I want to do,” then you’ve got to check yourself. You have to think to yourself, “What is my real job in life?” I think the real job is to wake up happy every day. People would say to me, when I was a kid, “There are millions of guitar players out there. Why do you think you’re going to make any noise?” My answer was unclear. I would say, “I’m gonna do it. I’m not going to stop. No matter what I’m going to keep going.” I just knew I was going to do that. However, the real reason was that I wanted to be happy every day and that’s what made me happy! I was lucky enough to get that stuff on my fingers and in my hands, from listening and singing when I was very young. I said, “This is what I want to do.” As you know, Ernest Hemingway is this amazing author. Somebody said to him, “Why did you become a writer.” This was in the 1950s or something like that. He said, “So I could wake up at 4 p.m. every day.” In other words, “I wanted to do what I wanted to do!” That was it! I think that is something we have to take care of. I talk about obsession and balance. Part of that balance is having to walk out, make money, live and do all that stuff but if you have that one time during your day where you walk into your room and you’re doing the shit that makes you happy, then I think life is going to be good! Like I said, if it becomes something your obsessed with in that light, I think the world will beat a path to your door. I think that’s the sort of unknown, faith and dark that I operate in.

It’s cool to hear the excitement in your voice about this project and the creativity it will usher in. Just chatting with you briefly, it’s hard not to be inspired. Any chance you might do a book at some point to spread this energy further?

I think at some point I might write something. If I did, it would be a smaller book with illustrations. It would be more of an experience kind of book, as opposed to a straight read. There would be a lot of content, but the point would be, rather than expounding upon stuff for 300 pages, I would keep it really tight and make it about lessons in life. One of the things I’ve learned is to break up the pattern. That comes from lifting weights, where you don’t always do the same routine. If you go to work every day, take a different route one of those days. Do something different. All that stuff shakes us up and tips over the apple cart. I think it makes us something more as people!

That’s a great outlook! Thanks so much for your time today!

Thank you so much, Jason! I really appreciate the opportunity. I look forward to talking with you again soon. Have a great day!

Follow the continuing adventures of Kane Roberts through social media via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. ‘The New Normal’ is available through all music retailers now via Frontiers Records!

Posted in Blog, Celebrity Interviews, Featured StoriesComments (0)

Kane Roberts To Release “The New Normal” In January 2019 Via Frontiers Music Srl

Kane Roberts To Release “The New Normal” In January 2019 Via Frontiers Music Srl

Kane Roberts is back with a new solo album, “The New Normal“, which will be released on January 25, 2019. Today, the first taste of music has been released from the album in the form of the track, “Forever Out Of Place“. The song can be heard HERE.

Pre-order “The New Normal” on CD/LP/Digital and stream the single here:http://radi.al/TheNewNormal

“‘Forever Out of Place’ is one of the “lighter” tracks on the album, although it still kicks pretty hard with a killer chorus,” explains Roberts. “The lyrics are about not feeling at home anywhere, having zero sense of belonging, and the sooner you stop searching for those things, the sooner you realize where you belong. There is a bit of style cross section in terms of the material, but keep in mind that they all include my past, present, and what I hope to be my future, however short or long that might be.”

Kane has involved some really amazing friends in the making of “The New Normal, including Alice Cooper, Alissa White-Gluz of Arch Enemy, Nita Strauss, Babymetal drummer Aoyama Hideki, Kip Winger, Paul Taylor, and Ken Mary. Three years in the making, “The New Normal” melds the old and new in metal for a truly outstanding album. Kane comments on how the collaborations came to be:

“I noticed artists that were busting down doors and at the same time kickstarting new ways of thinking about life and creativity. I knew I wanted to try to work with some of them. Nita Strauss is a killer guitarist. She really tore it up on the song “King Of The World”. Her work on it woke me the f*** up and forced me to explore new guitar techniques to compliment her insane skills!

Alice Cooper….no one individual has scorched the earth like my former boss. I started getting into recording “Beginning Of The End” and realized I needed Alice to sing a duet with me. Not just a line, not just an intro, but sing throughout the song. I took the shot that he might be available at some point to get involved  and when I called, he said “I’m in Hollywood. I’ll be right over.” Full on stroke of luck.

My approach to much of the album was cinematic in the hope that sounds and lyrics would create imagery and emotion beyond what I had done before.Keeping with that idea, I had Alissa White-Gluz (Arch Enemy) fall from the sky like some pissed off dark angel in the middle of the song with Alice and I and burn the place down. Her attitude and singing prowess is stunning and I was so jazzed when she agreed to participate.

I was obsessed with getting drum monster Aoyama Hideki from Baby Metal. After he heard the song, he immediately came on board and played with controlled fury like only he can….AMAZING!

I also was also able to work with Brent Smith (Shinedown) and Lzzy Hale (Halestorm) on songwriting and they were of course a blessing to the entire process.

Upon hearing a few of the early recordings, Michael Alago (the A&R guy that discovered Metallica and White Zombie, to name just a few) offered to executive produce the project for me and got a lot of things done for that otherwise would have been impossible for me to accomplish.

Last, but certainly not least, no one plays bass like Kip Winger or sings quite the way he can. Didn’t think twice about asking him to join up and he delivered, like always.”

“My music has evolved over the years, even though I was out of the spotlight. Stepping into this new project, there are new styles and sounds evident, but I haven’t made some false effort to distance myself from the past. People will notice a blend of influences from classic rock and metal to the hot bands that are emerging more recently,” says Roberts.

He continues, “Zeppelin to Volbeat to Arch Enemy…they’re all bringing crushing energy to rock/metal while creating truly awesome music. I was lucky to have found Frontiers because they allowed me three years to make this album and sort through my truest feelings and vocal/guitar skills to create something meaningful to me. There is a real concern for preserving the creative process at Frontiers and to my way of thinking there’s no better place for me right now”

Of the many iconic images of ’80s rock ‘n roll, one that has certainly stood the test of time is Alice Cooper’s then “Rambo-looking” guitar player shooting fire from his M-80 shaped guitar. That guitar player is none other than Kane Roberts, an accomplished musician and singer who, after leaving Cooper’s band, went on to record a total of four solo albums (including the “Phoenix Down” project released by Frontiers Records in the late ’90s).

Kane‘s name and musical abilities first came to prominence on Alice Cooper’s “Constrictor” and “Raise Your Fist And Yell” albums. The tours and popular videos for each made Kane a well-known face in the scene, especially for his outstanding guitar skills, but also for his body-builder image and his iconic machine-gun guitar.

As a solo recording artist, he landed some Top 40 hits and his varied musical background includes recording, writing and touring with artists such as Rod Stewart, Desmond Child, KISS, Diane Warren, Alice in Chains, Berlin, Guns N’ Roses, Garland Jeffries, and more. He’s also written or recorded music for films like Light Sleeper, Penelope Spheeris’ Decline of Western Civilization, Friday the 13th IV: Jason Lives, John Carpenter’s Prince of Darkness, and more. In 1991, his second solo album for Geffen Records, “Saints and Sinners” was released and included the Top 40 Billboard hit “Does Anybody Really Fall In Love Anymore?”, originally written by Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora.

Tracklisting:
1. King Of The World (Feat. Nita Strauss)
2. Wonderful
3. Beginning Of The End (Feat. Alice Cooper, Alissa White-Gluz, Aoyama Hideki, Kip Winger)
4. Who We Are (Feat Katt Franich)
5.Forever Out Of Place (Feat. Kip Winger)
6. Leave This World Behind
7. The Lion’s Share (Feat. Kip Winger)
8. Leave Me In The Dark
9. Above And Beyond (Feat. Kip Winger)
10. Wrong

Follow Kane Online:
http://www.kaneroberts.com/
https://www.facebook.com/KaneRobertsFBPage/
https://twitter.com/Kane_Roberts
https://instagram.com/kanerobertsx

Posted in Blog, MusicComments (0)

Angel Vivaldi and Nita Strauss Announce “The Guitar Collective 2018” Co-Headline Tour

Angel Vivaldi and Nita Strauss Announce “The Guitar Collective 2018” Co-Headline Tour

Two of the most revolutionary guitar virtuosos of our generation — renowned soloist ANGEL VIVALDI and Alice Cooper axemaiden NITA STRAUSS — are pleased to announce the 2018 edition of The Guitar Collective, a United States tour kicking off on November 19 in New Bedford, MA. The tour will visit several major cities, ending in Asbury Park, NJ on December 21. ANGEL VIVALDI and NITA STRAUSS will co-headline each date of the tour with support from special guest Jacky Vincent (ex-Falling in Reverse). The Guitar Collective 2018 will mark NITA STRAUSS‘s live solo debut.

VIP and general admission tickets are available now via www.angelvivaldiofficial.com/tour. VIP Meet and Greets with ANGEL VIVALDI and NITA STRAUSS will include a Q&A session, a signed tour poster, and an HD photo with Angel and Nita.

The main goal of The Guitar Collective tour, now in its second year, is to give fans of instrumental guitar music a chance to discover new artists, and for those artists to branch out to new fans. The Guitar Collective founder ANGEL VIVALDI sees the tour as a place where people can come year after year to discover new virtuosos in an exciting live setting, not just behind their computers and phones.

ANGEL VIVALDI says, “The past four years have given us some of today’s most incredible guitarists. After last year’s Guitar Collective, which included Scale the Summit and Andy James, I knew I had to make this “modern G3” an annual outing. This year, not only do we have NITA STRAUSS‘s live solo debut, we’ve also got Jacky Vincent, who both will continue to carry the torch of instrumental guitar music for generations to come. I can’t wait to get on stage night after night to jam with my friends.

NITA STRAUSS adds, “These will be my first shows ever as a solo artist, and I couldn’t have hoped for a better fitting tour. I’ve been a huge fan of Angel’s since I first discovered his music and became an even bigger fan when I saw his incredible live performance. Angel and Jacky are two of the most innovative and exciting solo guitarists out there in the scene today, and I am beyond honored to share the stage with them on this tour!”

THE GUITAR COLLECTIVE 2018 TOUR DATES:
11/19 New Bedford, MA @ Greasy Luck
11/20 Philadelphia, PA @ Voltage Lounge
11/21 Clifton, NJ @ Dingbatz
11/23 Brooklyn, NY @ Brooklyn Baazar
11/24 Kent, OH @ Outpost Concert Spot
11/25 Detroit, MI @ The Loving Touch
11/27 Berwyn, IL @ Wire
11/28 Iowa City, IA @ Gabe’s
11/29 Kansas City, MO @ The Riot Room
11/30 Denver, CO @ Marquis Theater
12/1 Salt Lake City, UT @ Club X
12/2 Boise, ID @ The Shredder
12/4 Seattle, WA @ Club Sur Rocks
12/5 Portland, OR @ Paris Theatre
12/6 Orangevale, CA @ The Boardwalk
12/7 San Diego, CA @ Brick by Brick
12/8 Scottsdale, AZ @ Pub Rock
12/9 Los Angeles, CA @ 1720
12/11 Austin, TX @ Come and Take It Live
12/12 Houston, TX @ Scout Bar
12/13 Dallas, TX @ Trees
12/14 Memphis, TN @ Hi-Tone
12/15 Atlanta, GA @ Masquerade
12/16 Orlando, FL @ The Haven
12/17 Margate, FL @ O’Malley’s
12/18 Tampa, FL @ Crowbar
12/19 Spartanburg, SC @ Ground Zero
12/20 Richmond, VA @ Canal Club
12/21 Asbury Park, NJ @ House of Independents

About ANGEL VIVALDI:
As made evident throughout his five solo releases, ANGEL VIVALDI‘s blend of spell-binding guitar anthems and tasteful yet virtuosic playing have reached and inspired millions. Beginning his solo career in 2003, Vivaldi joined forces with the newly reformed 40 Below Summer in 2008. He continued to release multiple solo albums including the critically acclaimed Universal Language in 2010, which has become a must-hear staple in today’s instrumental album catalog. In 2012, Vivaldi joined supergroup Vext featuring Tommy Vext (Bad Wolves, Divine Heresy) as well as members from Mutiny Within. After the loss of his best friend to ALS in 2014, not long after the crowd-funded release of Away With Words Part 1, Angel realized that the only thing worse than living with regret would be to die with it. So in 2015, putting his confidence and trust in his audience, Vivaldi quit his day job, committing himself full-time to his career in music.

His latest full-length album, Synapse, is a conceptual opus that joyously matches musical wits with a number of his talented contemporaries. Vivaldi continues to captivate the masses with stunning video releases unlike any seen in the instrumental world such as “A Martian Winter,” “.. _ _ _ ” (Two), and most recently “Serotonin” which features not only NITA STRAUSS but also acclaimed dance crew The Wannabes.

Since beginning to tour in 2015, he has shared the stage with icons such as Yngwie Malmsteen, NITA STRAUSS, Gus G and Devin Townsend. In 2017, he launched his annual The Guitar Collective tour, which has featured artists such as NITA STRAUSS, Scale the Summit, Andy James, Yvette Young and more.

ANGEL VIVALDI online:
www.angelvivaldiofficial.com

About NITA STRAUSS:
Los Angeles born guitarist NITA STRAUSS has become a force to be reckoned with in the music world, dazzling audiences across the US, UK, Europe, Asia and Africa, and sharing the stage with a diverse range of artists including legendary R&B star Jermaine Jackson, deathcore heavy hitters As Blood Runs Black, early MTV darlings Femme Fatale, video game supergroup Critical Hit and popular tribute band The Iron Maidens. Her skill, exuberant stage presence and love for all things about her instrument have earned her a stellar reputation and endorsements from many top companies. Nita has been featured in many worldwide print ads and on dozens of albums, trailers, and soundtracks, most recently Heroes Of The Storm (Blizzard) and Grammy-nominated Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance (Konami/ Platinum Games), and is the author of the Premier Guitar column “Drop Dead Shred”. She was ranked #1 of Guitar World’s “10 Female Guitar Players You Should Know”, and has been featured in Revolver Magazine’s annual “Hottest Chicks in Hard Rock” issue and calendar for the last 2 years. She is currently on tour with Alice Cooper.

NITA STRAUSS online:
www.facebook.com/nitastrauss
www.twitter.com/hurricanenita
www.instagram.com/hurricanenita

Posted in Blog, MusicComments (0)

THAT METAL SHOW: This Week’s Episode To Feature Ace Freely, Mark Farner And Nita Strauss

THAT METAL SHOW: This Week’s Episode To Feature Ace Freely, Mark Farner And Nita Strauss

TMS-week10-ace-2015

Episode 10 of season 14 of VH1 Classic’s centerpiece in original programming “That Metal Show” marks the return of Kiss original guitarist Ace Frehley and the debut of former Grand Funk Railroad singer and guitarist Mark Farner. Ace chats with hosts Eddie Trunk, Don Jamieson, and Jim Florentine about Kiss’s long overdue induction into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, being on stage with his former band mates, and his frustrations with the original Kiss lineup not performing together at the ceremony. Mark Farner shares stories of the early Grand Funk Railroad days, even telling about a time they opened for Led Zeppelin and how he was blown away watching them perform. He says it is still one of the best performances he has ever seen to this day.

The episode also features the debut of Nita Strauss from Alice Cooper as the guest musician. Nita is only the second female musician to grace the second stage. Nita tears it up on the guitar and also talks about playing with Alice Cooper, being discovered while performing the national anthem at an LA Kiss football game, and the solo album she is currently working on.

This week’s “Rank” segment finds Frehley creating the definitive list of the Kiss albums he performed on. He jokingly states that he couldn’t rank certain albums higher because his recollection of recording them was a blur. Eddie continues to impress the panel during this week’s “Stump The Trunk” and this week’s “Throwdown” puts the debut Led Zeppelin album against the debut Black Sabbath album. The panel is split but the audience declares a clear-cut winner between the two. The “TMS Top 5” takes a week off but “Take It Or Leave It” returns, as the topic is the recent announcement of the retirement of Twisted Sister.

Fans can watch all previous episodes and other exclusive bonus clips at ThatMetalShow.VH1.com and on the new VH1 app as well as the new “That After Show” segment.

Season 14 has showcased some of the biggest names in music. This season featured Rush’s Geddy Lee, Frank Bello/Charlie Benante/Scott Ian of Anthrax, John 5, Chris Jericho, Kerry King of Slayer, Dave Lombardo formerly of Slayer and now with Philm, Zakk Wylde, Michael Schenker, Metallica’s Kirk Hammett, punk rock legend Marky Ramone, rap icon Darryl McDaniels of Run DMC, Gary Holt of Slayer/Exodus, Taylor Momsen of The Pretty Reckless, Max Cavalera. With 2 episodes remaining this season, Taime Downe of Faster Pussycat, Andy Biersack of Black Veil Brides, and Mark Slaughter will appear on the penultimate episode.

Known for having the best musicians in music perform each week, Season 14 of “That Metal Show” finishes with TMS alum Mike Orlando of Adrenaline Mob making his TMS musical debut and Billy Sheehan returning to dazzle the crowd with his unmatched bass playing skills. Previous Season 14 performers included Alex Skolnick of Testament, John 5 of Rob Zombie/John 5 Trio, Joel Hoekstra of Whitesnake, Frank Hannon of Tesla, the berserker Zakk Wylde of Black Label Society, double-neck shred-master Michael Angelo Batio, Rich Ward of Fozzy, and Damon Johnson of Thin Lizzy/Black Star Riders.

“That Metal Show” first premiered on VH1 Classic in November 2008 and since has become the only place for all things hard rock and heavy metal on cable television.  The show has been visited by some of the biggest names in the genres including members of Black Sabbath, Van Halen, Metallica, Aerosmith, Pantera, Kiss, Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, Pearl Jam, Guns N’ Roses, Queensrÿche, Heart, and many more.

“That Metal Show” is a production of VH1 Classic. Lee Rolontz, Jeff Baumgardner, and Keshia Williams serve as executive producers for VH1.

VH1 Classic brings you the best metal, rock, soul and pop from the ’70s, ’80s and ’90s. The channel features the gods of rock – from Black Sabbath, Metallica, and Iron Maiden to Stone Temple Pilots, Pearl Jam, and Dire Straits – in marquee concerts and music specials, and of course, tons of classic music videos. Recent big events include “National Metal Day” (11.11) and “Metal Evolution”, an 11-part documentary series on the history of metal.  When it comes down to it – all music should go to 11.

VH1 Classic
http://vh1classic.com

That Metal Show
http://thatmetalshow.vh1.com

That Metal Show Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/thatmetalshow

Posted in Blog, Movies, TV and More!, MusicComments (0)