Tag Archive | "Robert De Niro"

Robert De Niro Gets Filthy New Red Band Trailer For ‘Dirty Grandpa’

Robert De Niro Gets Filthy New Red Band Trailer For ‘Dirty Grandpa’

dirty-grandpa-2015-1

From the comedy minds that brought you Borat and Ali G [director Dan Mazer] and Bad Santa 2 [writer John Phillips], comes DIRTY GRANDPA. When the straight-laced Jason [Zac Efron] is tricked into driving his foul-mouthed grandfather, Dick [Robert De Niro], to Daytona for spring break, all bets are off in this hilarious new comedy.

Julianne Hough, Aubrey Plaza, Dermot Mulroney and Adam Pally also co-star. Check out the new Red Band Trailer for even more antics from DIRTY GRANDPA, coming to theaters January 2016!

Posted in Blog, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)

New Trailer And Poster Released For ‘Dirty Grandpa’ With Zac Efron and Robert De Niro

New Trailer And Poster Released For ‘Dirty Grandpa’ With Zac Efron and Robert De Niro

dirty-grandpa-2015-posterPrepare to see Zac Efron and Robert De Niro as you’ve never seen them before…

Check out the new Trailer and Teaser Poster, just released from the upcoming comedy DIRTY GRANDPA.

From director Dan Mazer and writer John Phillips, Julianne Hough, Aubrey Plaza, Dermot Mulroney and Adam Pally co-star in the new film about an uptight corporate attorney [Efron] tricked into driving his foul-mouthed grandfather [De Niro] to Daytona Beach, FL to loosen him up.

Buckle-up for the ultimate road trip, coming to theaters January 2016!

Posted in Blog, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)

ON THE RISE: Rebecca Da Costa Discusses Her Breakout Role In ‘The Bag Man’

ON THE RISE: Rebecca Da Costa Discusses Her Breakout Role In ‘The Bag Man’

rebecca-da-costa-feature-2014

Brazilian born actress Rebecca Da Costa is more than just a pretty face.  Her whirlwind ride to the top began at the age of fourteen, when she was discovered during a model search. It wouldn’t be long before she made her debut at Milan Fashion Week at the tender age of sixteen and soon began gracing runways around the globe for fashion titans such as Giorgio Armani, Yves Saint Laurent, Escada and Hugo Boss, just to name a few. Her success would also lead her to become the irresistible face of high-impact campaigns for Chopard, Swarovski, Nokia and L’Oreal. Her success in the modeling field gave her the opportunity to pursue her passion for acting; something she had longed to do professionally since her childhood. It wouldn’t be long after setting her sights on the film industry that Da Costa found herself landing an acting gig on HBO’s “Entourage.” Her star has been on the rise ever since! The latest project for this multi-facted artist is no less impressive, as it pairs her with the iconic screen actors Robert De Niro and John Cusack.

‘The Bag Man’ is a taut crime thriller that follows the story of Jack (John Cusack), a tough guy with chronic bad luck but human touches. Hired by Dragna (Robert De Niro), a legendary crime boss to complete a simple but unusual task, the plot centers around the anticipated arrival of Dragna who has summoned Jack and a host of shady characters to a remote location for unknown reasons. Over the course of a long and violently eventful night awaiting Dragna’s arrival, Jack’s path crosses that of Rivka (Rebecca Da Costa), a stunningly beautiful woman whose life becomes physically and emotionally entangled with Jack’s. When Dragna finally arrives on the scene there are sudden and extreme consequences for all.

Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently sat down with Rebecca Da Costa to discuss her blossoming career, her breakout role in director David Gorvic’s impressive debut film, the challenges involved and what the future holds for this star on the rise!

Rebecca Da Costa

Rebecca Da Costa

Let’s give everyone a little bit of background on you. How did you get started on your journey into the entertainment industry and made you want to pursue a career in this field?

I always wanted to be an actress since I was a child. Always! I started to work as a model at the age of thirteen. I left my home at fourteen and traveled around the world but I always had in the back of my head that a certain point I would go back to acting. About four years ago, I was living in New York and I decided to start taking acting classes. I ran into a friend in a parking lot, it was one of those things in life; she said “I am living in LA, why don’t you come by and visit me?” I said “Ok! Cool!” I booked a plane ticket and the next week I was in LA. I said “You know what? I like it and I am going to stay!” I kept working as a model and taking acting classes. Six months later, I booked my first role on “Entourage.” That is how everything started but I never really decided to be an actor, I know it what I was born to do!

As an actor, who would you cite as your biggest Influences or inspirations?

Early on I was very influenced by a Latin actress, a Brazilian actress, named Fernada Montenegro. She is unbelievable. She did a movie called “Central Station” and she was the first Brazilian actress to be nominated for The Oscar. She is brilliant and I really look up to her. When it comes to American actresses, Viola Davis has inspired me so much and she is so good! There is so much honesty in everything she does. Every time I see her on screen, her performance brings me to tears.

Rebecca Da Costa

Rebecca Da Costa

Did you find making the transition from modeling to acting a difficult one to make or does one lend itself to the other?

Modeling kind of helped me make the transition because I was already kind of in the business. I found it was easy and it helped me. Being a model left me with a flexible schedule and left me time to take those classes to help me become an actress.

That leads us to you latest film project, “The Bag Man.” How did you get involved with this project initially?

I was offered the role and they asked me to come in and audition anyway. I went to audition two times and then a few weeks I got the phone call from the producer saying that I had the part and would be play the lead opposite John Cusack and Robert De Niro. I was like “Oh my God!” and I just started screaming because it seemed too good to be true! [laughs] I thought it was a very challenging role and I thought to myself, “If I can do this, I can do anything!”

Absolutely! What was it about this character that intrigued when you read the script for the first time?

She is just really sharp and has a dry sense of humor. She is very physical and I haven’t done much action prior to this film. She is very much a femme fatale. All of those things really excited me about the part.

In Theaters February 28th!

In Theaters February 28th!

What do you feel you brought to this character that might not have been on the original written page?

Like I said, she has many layers. The director, David Grovic, gave me the freedom to create. I said “I know that there are many layers to this character and some of these layers will peel off. How about if we add some visual layers?” He said “What do you mean?” I said “What if she has a wig? How about if she has these very weird outfits?” You know, the “super woman” thing that one of the characters jokes about in the film. Those are things I added to the table. I think my accent, as well, worked to my advantage because you aren’t really sure where she is from or what she is doing in the middle of nowhere in this hotel with these sketchy people! I think that is what I brought to the character.

How did you prepare yourself physically and mentally for this action-oriented role?

I did my own stunts for this project but I wasn’t expecting to be doing my own stunts! Something happened to the stunt double and they asked me if I would feel comfortable doing my own stunts. I said “Yes!”I did a week of preparation with a stunt coordinator to make sure I wouldn’t hurt myself and learn the techniques. That is what I did! Thank God nothing was life-threatening, you know? [laughs] It was a lot of fun!

Is that something you could see yourself doing more of in your future roles?

Oh yeah! I would love to! I had the time of my life and thought it was really cool!

rebecca-da-costa-5-2014

What can you tell us about what director David Grovic brought to the table for this project and what you learned from your time working together?

He is from England and has a very dry sense of humor and he brought that to the movie, which gave another wonderful layer to the movie. He also wrote the script, so that worked a lot in our advantage because when you work with a director who also wrote the script, they know it inside and out. It is so good to work with somebody like that! He gave us so much freedom as actors. We were able to improvise or to change lines if we wanted to. It was a great experience! Even this was his first movie, it looks like his tenth movie because he was so comfortable doing it.

Rebecca Da Costa

Rebecca Da Costa

Much of the film was shot in New Orleans. What effect did the city itself have on this picture and the performances?

It was my first time in New Orleans and I have to say I loved it! The city reminded me so much of my hometown in Brazil. The people, the food and the music was just so much fun! We shot for two months and it was a very nice shoot for two months. We started shooting from 6 PM to 6 AM every single day. That alone brought a different energy to the set. We shot a lot by the swamps and every now and then would have a visit from an alligator or a snake and always had visits from big mosquitoes! [laughs] Everything was exciting and all of those elements brought an incredible energy to the project.

This film features a terrific collection of talented actors, you included. What are your recollections of meeting John Cusack and Robert De Niro for the first time?

I was very nervous actually! John and I got to New Orleans two weeks before we started shooting. I was going to meet him, the director and the producer in his room. I remember I was in the elevator shaking! I was like “My God! Is he going to be cool? Is he going to be a snob? I am not sure!” When he opened the door, he had a big smile on his face and he said “Hey! Come on in!” He was so cool! At that moment, I didn’t feel nervous at all anymore because he was so cool, so humble and made me feel so comfortable. The same is true with DeNiro. He is a man of few words but he was a very simple, kind and generous man.

That is terrific to hear. It sounds like a great opportunity to really learn something about your craft from two of the best. What did you take away from them and did you find yourself studying what they were doing while on set?

Yes, I did find myself watching them a lot on set and while they were acting as well. There is a scene in the movie where DeNiro’s character has a huge monologue, like seven pages, and we did the rehearsal the day before the scene. I remember I was watching him and I thought to myself “My God! He is so good! This is the best acting class I have ever had!” Watching him act was an amazing experience. He knew all seven pages by heart and did it without one mistake. What I learned from them is just to be professional. They have been doing it forever, for many years, and they are still open. As an actor, you should always be open because one thing is on the script but when you get to the set things can change. You have to be open to those changes. If you get to the set and the director says “Ok. Let’s forget the script and let’s improvise all the scenes.” you have to be open to that. The director is the maestro of the set. Those are a few things I have learned, for sure!

rebecca-da-costa-2-2014

You have quite a few projects under your belt at this point. How do you feel you have evolved as an actor since first starting out?

I feel like, as with any other job, the more experience you have, the better you are! Every role I accept, I try to make sure it has things that challenge me as an actor. Every time I get a script and I think to myself that I can’t do it, it is exactly what I should be doing! That is the feeling I have every time I accept a role! Once I am done, I say “Ok. I have grown so much. Now I am ready for something bigger!” That is how I felt when we wrapped “The Bag Man.” I thought, “Oh my God! I can’t believe I did that! I am so glad!” Now I am ready for the next challenge!

Rebecca Da Costa

Rebecca Da Costa

What is the next challenge for you? Do you already have something in your sights?

Yeah. I would love to do a comedy. I have done a lot of drama and I have done action now with “The Bag Man.” I think a huge challenge would be a comedy. Also, a musical would be an amazing challenge. I would love to be able to combine acting, singing and dancing! It would be a dream and I would love to do that!

Do you have any aspirations to step behind the camera in some capacity in the future?

Yes. I used to direct my own plays back in Brazil. I used to write, produce and direct the plays. I would love to go back to directing, yes. Not right now. It would be a very far away, future plan. Maybe ten years away from now or something but yes, I would love to.

You can serve as such an inspiration to young people. What is the best piece of advice you can pass along to those who are looking to pursue a career in the entertainment industry?

I think if you really believe in your heart that it is your passion and you are born to do it — just go for it! Believe me, there are going to be many obstacles. Every day there is a new obstacle with the language, being foreign or being in a country that is not my own. You just have to keep pushing and believe in your dreams and things will start happening! It doesn’t matter what others think. As long as you believe in your dreams, you throw out an energy and all of a sudden things start to happen in your life. That is how I have been working in my life.

Rebecca Da Costa

Rebecca Da Costa

Do you feel there are any misconceptions about yourself?

I guess people always judge you by the way you look, you know? I think people can sometimes be intimidated because I am so tall but I don’t really pay too much attention to what people may think about me. I just try to keep it real.

Are you involved in any charity work we could help you spread the word on?

Yes! I am involved with an HIV project called Break The Silence. We just have to educate people because people who have HIV can be so stigmatized. It is so unfair. I think the more we talk about it, the more we will help spread the word. It is a terrific organization. You can learn more at http://btscampaign.org.

In researching your life, I read you were working on a book. What can you tell us about the status of that project?

Oh, yes! I love to write! I was writing this romance about a Brazilian girl who comes to New York to find love. It has nothing to do with me! It is not autobiographical! [laughs] I had to stop because I have been so busy promoting “The Bag Man” but I hope to go to back to it in the next year or so!

Terrific! We will be anxiously awaiting all of you projects! Thanks so much for your time today, Rebecca! Talk to you again soon!

Thank you, Jason! It is a pleasure talking to you! Take care!

‘The Bag Man’ hits theaters on February 28th, 2014. Follow @TheBagManMovie on Twitter. Be sure to interact with the lovely and talented Rebecca Da Costa on Twitter at twitter.com/BeccadaCOST.

Posted in Blog, Celebrity Interviews, Featured Stories, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)

Screenwriter Leslie Dixon Talks ‘Limitless’ and Beyond!

Screenwriter Leslie Dixon Talks ‘Limitless’ and Beyond!

Leslie Dixon is certainly no stranger to the world of screenwriting. Her resume speaks for itself, boasting mega-hits such as ‘Overboard,’ ‘Look Who’s Talking Now,’ ‘Mrs. Doubtfire’ and ‘Freaky Friday.’ In 2011, Dixon finds herself branching out from her comedic roots to a techno-thriller adapted from author Alan Glynn’s novel, The Dark Fields. A paranoia-fueled action thriller, ‘Limitless’ stars silver screen icons Bradley Cooper and Robert De Niro. The film centers on Cooper’s character, Eddie Morra, who is a down and out writer who unlocks the true potential of his brain by taking a cutting-edge pharmaceutical. Every choice in life has its consequences and taking the miracle drug NZT is no exception to the rule. He quickly discovers that his newfound abilities have made him a target for some of the most greedy and dangerous men on the planet. Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with Leslie Dixon to discuss her career, the journey of bringing ‘Limitless’ from script to screen and much more!

They always say that tackling a career in the entertainment industry isn’t for the faint of heart. Could tell us a little bit about how you got started on your career path?

The way that I put it is I say it’s a tough business to be in if you really love movies. I just got started because I was raised in San Francisco which is a very movie centric culture by a mother who adored film and dragged me around to every revival house as well as every current film you could possibly think of giving me an inadvertent education in film. Infecting me with her disease of loving movies.

Well it seems like that was probably a good thing to get infected with!

Right! Then later when earning a living became an unfortunate necessity I didn’t really – there were really no economic means that we had and I didn’t even know film school existed.  I wish I could have gone to film school.  It would have been great but I just moved down to Los Angeles.  I didn’t go to college at all and as there was just no possibility of that I had to get a job.  I moved out to L.A. and just started working crappy little jobs, reading scripts at night and working up the guts to write one.

Who were some of the influences or what were some of the influences that helped shape you as a writer in those early years?

Probably more classic pictures from the ‘30s and screwball comedies than – well contemporary movies, movies I saw as a kid.  I mean things like MASH and there was – MASH, things like that were great.  I loved the pictures that Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner were making in those days.  I loved Preston Sturges.  I loved all of Ernst Lubitsch’s movies going back to the ‘40s and then the ‘30s, Billy Wilder, big influence.  But probably I was the most influenced by this comedy program my mother would play on the radio on Saturday mornings which was just classic standup routines by everybody from the ‘30s all the way up to and including what was contemporary.  So all of that stuff, early Steve Martin, early George Carlin, Bob and Ray, Nichols and May, all that stuff was programmed into my hard drive.  That was really helpful later when I wanted to write comedy myself.

Your latest project is ‘Limitless’ based on the book ‘The Dark Fields.’  How did you first come across that story?

I came across it because I was looking for something good to read.  I was standing in a secondhand book store in San Francisco and asked the guys to give me something that I would love because I had just been reading so many bad novels and things that studios had wanted to adapt that were mechanical and soulless and I needed to cleanse my palette.<

They gave me this book and I just read it for pleasure.  But at about the halfway point I was getting one of those tingles.  “Oh shit, I’ve got to make this.  This is a movie.”  It turned out that They Miramax owned the rights and I had to go through quite a rigmarole to pry their hands off of the book.  But ultimately I got control of is, wrote the scripts as I wish with no executive input and set myself up as the producer of the movie.  But that – saying that in one sentence is a lot less time than it actually took.

Yeah, I bet.  Something tells me you ran into your share of struggles along the way.  What can you tell us about that?

Well it was hard to get my hands on a piece of material that was owned by someone else, obviously but I was very concerned about making the picture with Miramax because I had heard that the company was imploding.  Indeed, subsequently it did.  So I made a deal with Harvey (Weinstein) that I would write the script for free but if he didn’t respond in a certain period of time I would get the rights.  Then I’m afraid I did a bad thing.  I turned it in during Canne when I knew no one would read it.  The mirror went up and it was mine.

Can you tell us a little bit about bringing the book to the written form that you brought it to?  How do you go about tackling that project?

Well I love the premise, the ultimate smart drug and sort of a slacker loser who gets a hold of it and within three weeks he’s brokering a mega merger between the two largest corporations in America.  I love that whole idea.  It did not have enough visual or action panache to be a feature film though.  So there’s quite a bit from the book in the first third of the film.  The second two-thirds kind of departs into a more actiony, suspenseful genre piece.  I’m pleased or sorry, depending on who you are, to say that most of the truly disgusting action bits in it are made up by me.

What can you tell us about – obviously there are a couple dynamics here but what about the dynamic between you and the author and you and the director?  Were there any similarities there?

Well I – no because one of them you have to collaborate within a mutually respectful fashion.  The other whom, the author, you could if you were the wrong kind of person just blow him out of the process completely, never tell him anything and he’s lucky to show up at the premiere.  Once the guy sell the book the studio and can be quite disrespectful about including them in the process in any meaningful way.  I happen to think Alan is a great writer.  I like him personally and I kept him informed and included and consulted at every turn.

This movie came close to getting made several times.  So some of those times were heartbreaking.  But ultimately in the end he was able to pay off his mortgage with the fat fee that he received.  I kept him in the loop because of respect.  The director of course you are manicult to.  You are stuck with.  Neil is a writer but not on this one.  He was hired to direct.  So there were times where we would get a little contentious with each other but not in any way where the underlying respect was lost or ultimately agreement wasn’t reached.  I think the product is a very good marriage of his sensibility and mine.

Looking back on the project from your standpoint what was the biggest challenge throughout the whole rigmarole?

The biggest challenge was making sure that a major studio understood that we were not making a drug movie.  You could look at the long line of this and think it’s ‘Requiem for a Dream.’  It’s not.  It’s not that.  It’s a Faustian bargain.  It’s a movie about power and what people will do to get it.  It certainly in no way glorifies or – it’s about a designer for a pharmaceutical which is a different thing from a bunch of grubby kids in a crack den.  But sometimes studios when they’re considering reading a script or making a project will only look at the long line.  When you reduce something to two lines they could easily have gotten the impression that it was a drug movie and just go, “Oh we don’t want to make that,” and pass on it..  So I found that it was the people who really read the material that they understood that we were out to make an enjoyable thrill ride, not a grubby, cautionary, addiction tale.

Now that you have made the jump from your earlier material to this more edgy material is there a type of film or a genre that as a writer that you’re eager to explore?

Broadway musicals.

Really?

Come on down. Seriously!  I did ‘Hairspray’ and that was just a book but I’d like to do more and I’d like to do it for the stage.  I think it would be really fun. I’ve been wanting all my life to do something like that. But I definitely would like to do more movies like this, too.  I found that this genre seems to come frighteningly natural to me.  I think I’m really a disgusting person inside.

Looking back on your career so far how do you feel that you’ve evolved in your craft?

I’ve had to really stay one step ahead of burnout.  Burnout is a terrible occupational hazard for people who write a lot in any genre, screenwriting or any other.  Screenwriting particularly because everything that you do is hyper criticized and kicked apart at many levels; the executive level, the director level, later at the critical level.  You have to develop the hide of a rhinoceros but even beyond that just the sheer volume of pages that you’re turning and turning and turning and people saying, “No, this way, that way, up, down,” can burn you out.  So it’s really important in my evolution.  Switching genres helps keep me fresh, taking breaks, playing bluegrass guitar with my hippie friends, anything to keep that burnout at bay because when you go there you are certainly not a good writer.

As an accomplished writer what advice would you give to someone who is looking to pursue a career in your field?

Well I would say that they have a lot of advantages I didn’t have because the Internet exists.  You can read professional scripts online.  You can – contests, the reward of which is possibly a professional representation.  There are so many avenues of information on how to do this that didn’t exist when I started out.  But I would say really the only rule is, “Does the reader want to turn the page to the next page?”

What should we be on the lookout next for you?  Is it a big project or a more bluegrass guitar as you just said?

I think if I had to jump into something major tomorrow I’d probably shoot myself.  We are definitely looking at some powering down for awhile.  I am wiped out.  This movie took years off the director’s life, my life.  I can’t say the same for Bradley.  He’s the Energizer Bunny in that way but its road to the screen was exhausting.  We’re very proud of how it turned out but I definitely – I would be doing anyone a disservice if I took a job tomorrow.  They would be getting a little withered husk of what used to be Leslie.

Well thank you very much for your time.  I look forward to talking to you again in the future.  Good luck with your little break and we hope to see you soon.

Thank you so much.

Posted in Blog, Celebrity Interviews, Featured Stories, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)

Limitless: Director Neil Burger Discusses His Latest Film!

Limitless: Director Neil Burger Discusses His Latest Film!

Director Neil Burger exploded onto the scene in 2002 with his debut film ‘Interview with the Assassin’. The pseudo-documentary style film was soon followed by his sophomore effort, ‘The Illusionist’ in 2006. The film, which starred Edward Norton, Paul Giamatti and Jessica Biel quickly became a fan favorite and established Burger as one of Hollywood’s most exciting up-and-coming directors. In 2008, he thrilled audiences and critics alike with his next effort, ‘The Lucky Ones’ with Oscar winner Tim Robbins in the lead role. Now, in a whole new decade, Neil Burger stands ready to release his forth film entitled ‘Limitless,’ which is based on the novel “The Dark Fields” by Alan Glynn. The film, which stars Bradley Cooper and Robert De Niro, is a paranoia-fueled action thriller about an unpublished writer whose life is transformed by a top-secret smart drug that allows him to use 100% of his brain and become a perfect version of himself. His enhanced abilities soon attract shadowy forces that threaten his new life in this darkly comic and provocative film. Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with Neil Burger to discuss his roots in the entertainment industry, the challenges involved with bringing ‘Limitless’ from script to screen and much more!

What led you to become a filmmaker and go that direction?

Growing up I was always drawing and painting, it’s kind of what I did. It was just to relax, to keep your sanity or whatever is, it was just what I really enjoyed doing. Then as I got older I was sort of circling around set design, so I started doing some theatre, I was doing photography, so it was all kind of like circling around filmmaking.  Then I finally really got interested in moving images and at first thought I was going to do art films, more like stuff that you would … like they were paintings, but they were moving … and then started getting interested in narrative and writing short stories and then writing scripts and little scenes and making short films and yeah slowly just was all kind of headed toward that. So that’s kind of my … that’s where I was coming from.

Well, it seems like it’s working out for you so far.

Yeah, before, but like you say whose gonna push us any harder and you never know when it’s all gonna just kind of go collapsing down, but so far, so good.

Obviously you came from a bunch of different mediums. Who is your biggest professional influence as a filmmaker?

Let’s see … I mean the directors I like are Scorsese and Cooper, but also Mike Leigh. You know Mike, because you know the British filmmaker … “Secrets & Lies” and things like that … so sort of a number of different people, but they’re all cinematic in a different way … cinematic in a sense that it’s like all incredibly well observed and to me that’s what cinematic is.

Your latest project is “Limitless.” What initially attracted you to this project?

Well, they sent me the screenplay to direct and I just really dug it. I liked that is was this guy, who was sort of this down and out artist, this down and out writer who was just kind of at the end of his rope and then found a way to sort of become the perfect version of himself. I also liked … I also felt like it was a … it’s not intelligent and even potential but very much about power as well and that always interests me. The other movies I’ve done, they’re always about characters who are sort of out of power, who then try to find some way to empower themselves, to kind of make their life worth … more worthwhile. So that theme and this and I also really liked that it was a New York story – it takes place in New York – and those issues of power are very much kind of a New York story. New York being kind of this power sensor and Manhattan being kind of like the big brain, as I was thinking of it and so I thought it was a really honest and accurate depiction of various power societies, if you will, in New York.

Now you weren’t the writer on this one obviously, and this was the first time in that aspect.

Yeah.

Did you have any reservations about that going into it?

I did. I did, yeah. The other films, you’re right, I had written them as well as directed them and that was … that’s really the way I saw myself as a writer/director and I was just going to direct the things I wrote, but I got this and I really liked it and I thought well here’s an opportunity to just be a director, which means like just to interpret what’s on the page and then go off and run with it. That’s what a great director does, is they just take it and they run and they make it. They’re not stuck with what’s on the page, they just are … whatever they need to do to make the scene better or more intense through the whole movie that way, they do and so it was a great opportunity to do that. I actually thought it was really liberating as a filmmaker to not have written it.

One of the big things in the film – obviously the center point as well – is the change that Bradley Cooper goes through when he takes this pharmaceutical.

Yeah.

How difficult was it to bring to the screen something that’s so internal and visualize that? Can you tell us a little bit about that process?

Yeah. I mean that was the real challenge, to visualize and represent how he sees the world and the change that he undergoes. So for me it was also trying to figure out how do we show that in a way that we haven’t seen before. I just didn’t wanna like push into his pupil and then see it dilate and then we were, “How often have we seen this? I’ve only seen that a million times in various films” and I wanted the audience to be with him as he underwent that change, but also to kind of make it … I wanted it to … I didn’t want it to be a typical digital visual kind of effect that you see a lot. I wanted it to kind of almost be organic or sometimes even sort of handmade, but most of all I wanted it to have an emotional connection to him. So, I just spent a lot of time thinking about it and drawing things and figuring out how he sees the world and what’s a cool representation of it and doing a lot of research and looking at a lot of strange photographs and art and video clips and things like that and slowly working up and experimenting with my own shooting to come up with various looks or effects to show how he was experiencing the world on that drug.

How long did that process take? I know the film had kind of a long history. How long did it take you to come up with that?

Well, from the minute I started working on it, I was thinking about it, but I think when Bradley Cooper became involved and there was a little bit of a wait because he was still working on “A-Team” – he signed on, then he took off to do “A-Team” – and that made it very real and so that kind of jumped it up. So, that sort of six months or so while I was waiting for him I kind of came up with all the various looks and effects that were eventually in the movie. I storyboarded them and drew them and got visual reference so I could kind of explain them to the cinema photographer and to the rest of the crew who would be working on them. I had a lot more than are in the movie but then you kind of pare it down and find the ones that are really the most important to show what you’re after.

You obviously have a great cast in Bradley Cooper and De Niro. What do you think they brought to the table that someone else might not have?

Well, I think Bradley brought to it a – he’s a really, really good actor and we’ve seen him as a really good actor and now you see him as a really great actor. He’s like a tour de force role and you get to see really what this guy’s made of and he’s a great actor. So what he brought to the role I think is a real hunger for the part, it’s kind of the first thing that he’s done where he’s carrying the whole movie. So that was really important to him, but also you get … he’s obviously been through what the character Eddie Morris did. He’s been a struggling actor and I’m sure when he was younger he wondered, “What a mess, is it all gonna work out, or what’s going to happen” or whatever and then he also has some success and he’s a very smart guy and so he was able to do both sides of it, the more vulnerable side and then the side where he’s just talking circles around people. He has that brain and he has that verbal ability to do that, so he was perfect for it. Then De Niro, the character he’s playing Carl Van Loon, he’s a really impressive accomplished financier who’s gotten there through hard work, he’s paid his dues and just by being incredibly intelligent. He plays a powerful character and I needed somebody who had that sort of power and the ability to intimidate somebody as well.

Obviously, De Niro is a screen legend at this point and that comes with its own set of baggage. Was there anything that surprised you about working with him?

How easy it was actually. How generous he was as an actor, but also how willing he was to take direction. He wanted it, he asked for it and he knows that’s part of the collaboration to making a good character and making a good scene and a good movie.  Anyway, so that was like incredibly generous to me as a director to feel like I could tell this guy where to stand or how to say a line or place, something like that, and he invited it and it was great.

Looking back on your work now since you started out, how do you feel you’ve evolved as a filmmaker?

Well, I mean you do evolve and I think you kind of get better working with the actors  and being able to direct them but the tough thing when you’re directing somebody, like when you see a scene or a line and it’s like not quite what you were after and then you got to immediately figure out what’s wrong and then figure out an interesting way to say it so that the actor can really act on it – what you’re saying. It’s all happening really quickly because you got a few seconds between takes to put something right, so I think I’ve done better at that. I think you just sort of start to be able to encapsulate and understand how a story works and also just visually you just get more confident and get more tools in your tool chest.

Now obviously with the way things have changed with filmmaking I know a lot of younger people are looking to get into the industry. What would be your best advice from your years of experience, being a seasoned vet, to these young filmmakers?

Well, I would say to write is the … the thing when if you’re like a singer, you have to fix your own songs because you can’t rely on somebody else to give you songs to sing. So, it’s the same thing as a director. If you can write and create your own films so you can make a short film and then you can order something really small and start building up. It might take one, it might take 10, it might take a dozen, it might take 20 little films and then slowly piecing them together and then maybe getting a shot. So, that’s the most important thing. Oh, also just to keep working, keep filming, shoot a scene, edit it, figure out how its working, why it’s not working and then go back and do another one.

Awesome, that’s great advice. Just one more for you. What do you think is next on the horizon for you at this point? Where can we look for you next?

Well I’m not quite sure. I’m juggling a bunch of things. There’s things that I have written in the past that are now kind of rising up again and then there’s a few things that I’m being offered now and so it’s a funny film climate out there, it’s hard to get something made. So, it’s a good two years of your life if it goes quick, so it’s a very delicate kind of calculation to figure out what’s the next one. You wanna make something that you really believe in, but you also don’t want it to just kind of disappear and no one ever see it. So, a bunch of different happened and I’m not quite sure which one’s gonna click first.

Awesome. Well, again, I thank you very much for your time. I’ll let you get out of here a little early and I hope to talk to you again in the future.

Okay then. Thanks so much!

Posted in Blog, Celebrity Interviews, Featured Stories, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)

Exclusive: New TV Spot For Relativity Media’s ‘Limitless’

Exclusive: New TV Spot For Relativity Media’s ‘Limitless’

Are you ready for your fix? Relativity Media’s upcoming film LIMITLESS starring Bradley Cooper, Abbie Cornish and Robert De Niro explodes into theaters on March 18th! Icon Vs. Icon has an exclusive TV spot for you to check out below! Check it out and weigh in with you thoughts!

Synopsis: Bradley Cooper and Robert De Niro star in Limitless, a paranoia-fueled action thriller about an unsuccessful writer whose life is transformed by a top-secret “smart drug” that allows him to use 100% of his brain and become a perfect version of himself. His enhanced abilities soon attract shadowy forces that threaten his new life in this darkly comic and provocative film.

Aspiring author Eddie Morra (Cooper) is suffering from chronic writer’s block, but his life changes instantly when an old friend introduces him to NZT, a revolutionary new pharmaceutical that allows him to tap his full potential. With every synapse crackling, Eddie can recall everything he has ever read, seen or heard, learn any language in a day, comprehend complex equations and beguile anyone he meets—as long as he keeps taking the untested drug.

Soon Eddie takes Wall Street by storm, parlaying a small stake into millions. His accomplishments catch the eye of mega-mogul Carl Van Loon (De Niro), who invites him to help broker the largest merger in corporate history. But they also bring Eddie to the attention of people willing to do anything to get their hands on his stash of NZT. With his life in jeopardy and the drug’s brutal side effects taking their toll, Eddie dodges mysterious stalkers, a vicious gangster and an intense police investigation as he attempts to hang on to his dwindling supply long enough to outwit his enemies.

Get your ‘Limitless’ fix on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LimitlessMovie, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/LimitlessMovie and at the official website at www.iamrogue.com/limitless.

Posted in Blog, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)

New Theatrical Poster & Trailer For Bradley Cooper In ‘Limitless’

New Theatrical Poster & Trailer For Bradley Cooper In ‘Limitless’

Relativity Media has just released a striking new theatrical one sheet and trailer for their upcoming film LIMITLESS, which opens in theaters nationwide on March 18, 2011. Check out the official site for the film at www.iamrogue.com/limitless and be sure to follow LIMITLESS on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LimitlessMovie.

Synopsis: Bradley Cooper and Robert De Niro star in Limitless, a paranoia-fueled action thriller about an unsuccessful writer whose life is transformed by a top-secret “smart drug” that allows him to use 100% of his brain and become a perfect version of himself. His enhanced abilities soon attract shadowy forces that threaten his new life in this darkly comic and provocative film.

Aspiring author Eddie Morra (Cooper) is suffering from chronic writer’s block, but his life changes instantly when an old friend introduces him to NZT, a revolutionary new pharmaceutical that allows him to tap his full potential. With every synapse crackling, Eddie can recall everything he has ever read, seen or heard, learn any language in a day, comprehend complex equations and beguile anyone he meets—as long as he keeps taking the untested drug.

Soon Eddie takes Wall Street by storm, parlaying a small stake into millions. His accomplishments catch the eye of mega-mogul Carl Van Loon (De Niro), who invites him to help broker the largest merger in corporate history. But they also bring Eddie to the attention of people willing to do anything to get their hands on his stash of NZT. With his life in jeopardy and the drug’s brutal side effects taking their toll, Eddie dodges mysterious stalkers, a vicious gangster and an intense police investigation as he attempts to hang on to his dwindling supply long enough to outwit his enemies.

Posted in Blog, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)

Bradley Cooper Unlocks His Potential With NZT In New Viral Campaign

Bradley Cooper Unlocks His Potential With NZT In New Viral Campaign

Bradley Cooper has been spotted pushing pills his new promo for the upcoming flick Limitless. The ad looks remarkably like the all-too-common pharmaceutical commercials on TV, but it’s actually part of a recently launched viral marketing campaign for the upcoming film.

The film is directed by Neil Burger (The Illusionist) and is an adaptation of Alan Glynn’s novel, The Dark Fields. It  focuses on Eddie Morra (Cooper), a writer who stumbles upon a performance-enhancing drug. The drug, known as NZT, allows Morra to “access 100% of his brain, learn new languages and conquer Wall Street.” All’s well until the downside of the drug starts to affect him, with side effects such as “paralysis, psychosis, brain damage and sudden death.”

Limitless also stars Robert De Niro, Abbie Cornish and Anna Friel, with a screenplay written by Leslie Dixon (The Thomas Crown Affair). The flick is slated to open March 18th, 2011.

Check out the viral promo or visit the NZT profile on Facebook atwww.facebook.com/theclearpill to unlock your full potential like Bradley Cooper!

Posted in Blog, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)

Check Out The Official ‘Machete’ Photobomb Website and Create A Poster!

Check Out The Official ‘Machete’ Photobomb Website and Create A Poster!

20th Century Fox is about release one of our most anticipated films of 2010, Machete. Written by Robert Rodriguez and co-directed by Ethan Maniquis, this badass flick features a star-studded cast which includes Jessica Alba, Michelle Rodriguez, Cheech Marin, Lindsay Lohan, Don Johnson, Jeff Fahey, and Steven Segal.

The film roars into theaters it on September 3rd, 2010! To celebrate the release of the film, 20th Century Fox has recently launched the “photobomb” feature on the ‘Machete’ website that allows you to upload a photo and create a poster. You can share it on the site or on Facebook. Check it out at www.machetephotobomb.com!

Machete was originally a hard-edged trailer featured in GRINDHOUSE that became fanboy fodder since its first showing at the 2006 Comic-Con.The feature version of the trailer finds Machete (Trejo) a renegade former Mexican Federale, roaming the streets of Texas after a shakedown from drug lord Torrez (Seagal). Reluctantly, Machete takes an offer from spin doctor Benz (Fahey) to assassinate McLaughlin (De Niro) a corrupt Senator. Double crossed and on the run Machete braves the odds with the help of Luz (Rodriguez), a saucy taco slinger, Padre (Marin) his “holy” brother, and April (Lohan) a socialite with a penchant for guns. All while being tracked by Sartana (Alba), a sexy ICE agent with a special interest in the blade slinger.

Posted in Blog, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)

Robert Rodriguez’s ‘Machete’ Red Band Trailer Slashes It’s Way Online!

Robert Rodriguez’s ‘Machete’ Red Band Trailer Slashes It’s Way Online!

20th Century Fox has released an explosive new red band trailer for one of our most anticipated films of 2010, Machete. Written by Robert Rodriguez and co-directed by Ethan Maniquis, this badass flick features a star-studded cast which includes Jessica Alba, Michelle Rodriguez, Cheech Marin, Lindsay Lohan, Don Johnson, Jeff Fahey, and Steven Segal.

Machete was originally a hard-edged trailer featured in GRINDHOUSE that became fanboy fodder since its first showing at the 2006 Comic-Con.The feature version of the trailer finds Machete (Trejo) a renegade former Mexican Federale, roaming the streets of Texas after a shakedown from drug lord Torrez (Seagal). Reluctantly, Machete takes an offer from spin doctor Benz (Fahey) to assassinate McLaughlin (De Niro) a corrupt Senator. Double crossed and on the run Machete braves the odds with the help of Luz (Rodriguez), a saucy taco slinger, Padre (Marin) his “holy” brother, and April (Lohan) a socialite with a penchant for guns. All while being tracked by Sartana (Alba), a sexy ICE agent with a special interest in the blade slinger.

The film is now slated for a September 3rd, 2010 release.

Posted in Blog, Movies, TV and More!Comments (0)