Tag Archive | "superjoint ritual"

HANK3 Announces Upcoming Eastern U.S. Tour

HANK3 Announces Upcoming Eastern U.S. Tour

Hank3 - 2011

HANK3, the most famous hellbilly rock n’ roll outlaw of all time, will perform at 14 music venues up, down, and all around the Eastern portion of the U.S. this June. The tour will kick off on June 3rd in Louisville, KY at the Mercury Ballroom and will run through West Virginia, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia before coming to an end on June 22nd in Raleigh, NC at the Lincoln Theatre.

For more information on the tour and to get your tickets, as well as other information on HANK3, please visit www.Hank3.com.

HANK3 Spring 2014 Tour Dates:

6/3 – Louisville, KY @ Mercury Ballroom

6/4 – Newport, KY @ Southgate House

6/6 – Huntington, WV @ V Club

6/7 – Morgantown, WV @ 123 Pleasant St

6/8 – Columbus, OH @ A&R Bar

6/10 – Cleveland, OH @ House of Blues

6/11 – Rochester, NY @ Montage Music Hall

6/13 – Buffalo, NY @ Town Ballroom

6/14 – Syracuse, NY @ Lost Horizon

6/17 – New York, NY @ Gramercy

6/18 – Philadelphia, PA @ The Trocadero

6/20 – Baltimore, MD @ Rams Head

6/21 – Norfolk, VA @ NorVA

6/22 – Raleigh, NC @ Lincoln Theatre

HANK3 dropped his two new albums in October 2013; double country disc Brothers of the 4×4 and single punk disc A Fiendish Threat (by his new project “3”) via HANK3 Records.  Both new albums are also available in a double LP edition. Buy the records here: (Brothers of the 4×4) (A Fiendish Threat)

Earlier this year, HANK3 released the first music video from the albums, this time from A Fiendish Threat. The video is for the track ‘Different From the Rest’ and features some psychedelic studio footage of HANK3 doing what he does best – blasting out some raucous anthems.

 

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HANK3 Releases New Music Video for “Different From The Rest”

HANK3 Releases New Music Video for “Different From The Rest”

hank3-2013-1

HANK3 dropped his two new albums in October 2013; double country disc Brothers of the 4×4 and single punk disc A Fiendish Threat (by his new project “3”) via HANK3 Records.

HANK3 has released the first music video from the albums, this time from A Fiendish Threat. The video is for the track ‘Different From the Rest’ and features some psychedelic studio footage of HANK3 doing what he does best – blasting out some raucous anthems. Click here to watch the video, exclusively via CraveOnline.com.

Both new albums are also available in a double LP edition. Buy the records here: (Brothers of the 4×4) (A Fiendish Threat)

For more information on HANK3, please visit www.Hank3.com.

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HANK3 Announces More U.S. Tour Dates for September and October 2013

HANK3 Announces More U.S. Tour Dates for September and October 2013

hank3-2013-1

HANK3, the biggest hellbilly rock n’ roll outlaw of all time, recently closed the first leg of his hugely successful North American tour in support of his upcoming triple-threat of new releases (double disc Brothers of the 4×4 and single disc A Fiendish Threat), hitting stores October 1, 2013 via Hank3 Records. Now, HANK3 can announce the second leg of this tour, hitting major south western cities in late-September through mid-October. See below for all currently confirmed tour dates.

HANK3 TOUR DATES:

9/28 – Little Rock, AR @ The Revolution Music Room

9/30 – Houston, TX @ Scout Bar

10/1 – San Antonio, TX @ Backstage Live

10/3 – Dallas, TX @ Gas Monkey Bar and Grill

10/4 – Lubbock, TX @ Jake’s Sports Cafe

10/6 – Albuquerque, NM @ Sunshine Theater

10/8 – Tempe, AZ @ Marquee Theatre

10/9 – Santa Ana, CA @ The Observatory

10/10 – Santa Ana, CA @ The Observatory (Day 2)

10/15 – Santa Cruz, CA @ The Catalyst

As mentioned above, HANK3 will release a brand new DOUBLE country album, entitled Brothers of the 4×4, and a single punk album, entitled A Fiendish Threat, with his new project “3”. Both albums will be released in a double LP edition. With these dual releases,Brothers Of The 4×4 and A Fiendish Threat added to his already huge and varied arsenal of music, HANK3 will be raising all sorts of hell on stage while the fans raise their glasses in the audience once again, and you can bet your last dollar a damn good time will be had by all. Fans will get to taste the hardcore punk horror rock of A Fiendish Threat, a rippingly fast blast of sounds reminiscent of The Misfits, Minor Threat, 7 Seconds, The Ramones and other punk rock greats that are as much a part of HANK3‘s musical identity as his country roots. Fans will also get to hear HANK3’s country record, Brothers of the 4×4, which is just that- country, and the realness of it shines throughout the record like moonlight hitting a mason jar of corn liquor- it ain’t always the smoothest, and it doesn’t come wrapped in a fancy package, but it’s 100% pure whoop-ass in a bottle that gets the job done quicker and better and reminds you of where you originally came from once you figure out what just hit you.

When HANK3 hits the road, he hits it much harder than most. HANK3 shows are legendary for their length and intensity, averaging three hours a night, starting with a country set and ending with whatever his latest musical experiment happens to be. The man goes full throttle all the time, every time, as anyone who has ever been to one of his innumerable shows will attest.

In reference to the new records themselves, besides living the songs’ subject matter first, HANK3 sang and played both guitar and drums on both. As if pulling triple duty wasn’t enough, he engineered, produced, mixed and mastered all the tunes as well. Recording in his own home and releasing music on his own label, the Megaforce distributed HANK3 Records, allowed Williams complete creative control during the four month period it took to make both records.

For more information on HANK3, please visit www.Hank3.com.

 

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HANK3 To Unleash “Brothers of the 4×4” And “A Fiendish Threat” On October 1st!

HANK3 To Unleash “Brothers of the 4×4” And “A Fiendish Threat” On October 1st!

The king of hellbilly, Mr. HANK3 himself, is pleased to announce a triple-threat of new releases, hitting stores October 1, 2013. HANK3will release a brand new DOUBLE country album, entitled Brothers of the 4×4, and a single punk album, entitled A Fiendish Threat, with his new project “3”.  Brothers of the 4×4 will also be available as a single LP vinyl version, and A Fiendish Threat will be available as a double LP vinyl version.

Recording in his own home and releasing music on his own label, the Megaforce distributed HANK3 Records, allowed Williams complete creative control during the four month period it took to make both records.

Besides living the songs subject matter first, HANK3 sang and played both guitar and drums on the records. As if pulling triple duty wasn’t enough, he engineered, produced, mixed and mastered all the tunes as well.  Not bad for someone who in his own words is dyslexic and has ADD,  ccording to HANK3 “my mind is all over the place”. But even a man talented and driven enough to do (count ’em) seven jobs at once has his limits, so HANK3 has once again assembled a top-notch ensemble of pickers and pluckers for Brothers Of The 4×4 and A Fiendish Threat.

The required stand-up bass holds the low end down at the deft hands of Zach Shedd, with David McElfresh and Billy Contreras whipping razor sharp bows across the fiddle. Daniel Mason handles banjo, with a special guest appearance on “Possum In A Tree” by former National Old-Time Banjo Champion Leroy Troy working his banjo in the old school clawhammer style, while Andy Gibson wrings the sweetest of notes out his stand up steel guitar. Finally, long-time collaborator and fellow multi-instrumentalist extraordinaire Johnny Hiland rips his chicken pickin’ guitar to feathers and shreds.

A little bit of country...

A little bit of country…

HANK3‘s latest country record is just that- country, and the realness of it shines throughout the record like moonlight hitting a mason jar of corn liquor- it ain’t always the smoothest, and it doesn’t come wrapped in a fancy package, but it’s 100% pure whoop-ass in a bottle that gets the job done quicker and better and reminds you of where you originally came from once you figure out what just hit you. On “Outdoor Plan” he sings of fishing and hunting as a way of life, and it’s a fact that more than one deer and turkey has met its maker at the end of HANK3’s gun’s barrel. The title track, “Brothers of the 4×4” celebrates the wide open full throttle love of off roadin’ and rootin’ in a four wheel drive- the cover of the record shows Williams mud bogging in a custom 4×4, and it’s not some redneck rental- that’s his ride. And because life ain’t always happy, when the heartbreak and hard times cracks through the sonic celebration on songs like “Loners 4 Life” and “Ain’t Broken Down”, it’s because HANK3 is well acquainted with the darker side of life, and not as some tourist. The album is a rich and gritty sounding mixture of sadness, pride, hope- in other words, it’s a great country record.

As mentioned above, HANK3 will head out on a headline tour of select major markets on August 24th. The tour will kick off in Austin, TX at The Austin Bat Fest, and will tour several cities, coming to a close on September 8th in Atlanta, GA at The Masquerade.

... a little bit of punk.

… a little bit of punk.

With Brothers of the 4×4 and A Fiendish Threat set for release October 1st, Williams is ready to hit the road, and when he hits the road, he hits it much harder than most. Hank 3 shows are legendary for their length and intensity, averaging three hours a night, starting with a country set and ending with whatever his latest musical experiment happens to be. For this touring cycle, fans will get to taste the hardcore punk horror rock of A Fiendish Threat, a rippingly fast blast of sounds reminiscent of The Misfits, Minor Threat, 7 Seconds, The Ramones and other punk rock greats that are as much a part of Hank 3’s musical identity as his country roots. But A Fiendish Threat, like all of the man’s musical output, is anything but a formulaic, by-the-numbers rehash of what has been previously done by others. Stand up bass, fiddle, and banjo are not exactly standard instruments in punk rock, but they are on this record, riding beneath 3’s howling distorted vocals. Perhaps this is the birth of rebelcore punk? Whatever you want to call it, Williams has left his own touch on the genre, even utilizing a bizarrely beautiful Hula-music-on-acid sounding Hawaiian guitar at times. Some of the songs can make the listener feel like someone dropped LSD in their cheap draft beer at a CBGB matinee show headlined by a ghoulish Hawaiian punk band. A Fiendish Threat is yet another of Williams already numerous signature sounds, and he’s excited to put it in front of the audience for the first time. “You know when you do a new record, you just want to play it for all your friends. That’s what I’m excited for with this punk record, I get use a voice that doesn’t get used that often, and pay respects to some of my influences at the same time. Doing this record made feel like I was growing stronger- it took some of the years off me, to tell you the truth. Playing it makes me feel young again,” he laughs, “How long I will be able to pull it off all depends on the voice, man.”

With these dual releases, Brothers Of The 4×4 and A Fiendish Threat added to his already huge and varied arsenal of music, HANK3will be raising all sorts of hell on stage while the fans raise their glasses in the audience once again, and you can bet your last dollar a damn good time will be had by all. The man goes full throttle all the time, every time, as anyone who has ever been to one of his innumerable shows will attest.

Listen to Brothers of the 4×4 and A Fiendish Threat, go to a show, and find out for yourself. Just remember the next day, after a few aspirins, a dinner at your own table, and a sleep in your own bed, that HANK3 will be down the road doing his thing again, and for that rebel, “doing the best I can” means something a little different than it does for the average man.

HANK3 Tour Dates:

8/24 Austin, TX @ The Austin Bat Fest

8/25 Ft. Worth, TX @ Rail Club

8/26 Tulsa, OK @ Cain’s Ballroom

8/27 Lawrence (KC), MO @ Granada

8/29 Sauget, IL @ Pops

8/30 Ft. Wayne, IN @ Pierre’s

8/31 Flint, MI @ Machine Shop

9/1 Indianapolis, IN @ The Vogue

9/2 Pittsburgh, PA @ Alter

9/4 Lancaster, PA @ The Chameleon

9/5 Washington, DC @ 9:30 Club

9/6 Richmond, VA @ National

9/7 Charlotte, NC @ Amos Southend

9/8 Atlanta, GA @ The Masquerade

HANK3’s new biography was recently penned by none other than heavy metal renaissance man and self-proclaimed redneck Randy Blythe of Lamb of God. Who better than a backwoods brother from another mother to conjure up a personal summary of HANK3’s recent successes and future plans?

 

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Phil Anselmo Reflects On Two Decades of ‘Cowboys From Hell’ & Much More!

Phil Anselmo Reflects On Two Decades of ‘Cowboys From Hell’ & Much More!

Phil Anselmo is a man who needs little introduction. Hailing from New Orleans, La., he has spent the better part of two decades establishing himself as one of rock’s most notorious and charismatic frontman. His work with Pantera, Down and Superjoint Ritual has gone onto not only shape, but continue to fuel the genre of heavy music. Now, 20 years after Pantera exploded onto the scene and left their undeniable mark, Anselmo and the remaining members of the band are taking a look back at their roots and celebrating a major career milestone. As fresh and releveant as the album still sounds to music fans, it is hard to believe one of rock’s most ferocious albums, ‘Cowboys From Hell,’ is celebrating its 20th anniversary.

Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently sat down with Phil Anselmo to discuss the commemorative re-release and making of that epic album, impact of Dimebag Darrell’s passing, shedding light on the misconceptions that surround him with his upcoming autobiography, and what we can expect from his solo material.

You have influenced so many with your musical projects. I was curious about how music first came into your life?

Oh man! I lived in the French Quarter. My earliest memories of childhood, the first stuff off the top of my skull, I was living in the French Quarter on a really, really busy street. I had really young, young parents. My mom was just into her 20s. Led Zeppelin, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles, King Crimson, all that stuff was shakin’ the floor, man. So it was born into me, so to speak. [laughs]

We all know, as fans, how wild a ride it has been for you through the years. To what do you attribute your longevity?

I get where you are coming from. I think it starts with having a great band around me, if you are talking about my longevity. Pantera was great, man. They were the most incredible musicians that I have ever played with. Great songwriters. I learned a lot from them. It’s making those great records, touring and being visible and I’ve gotta say, on the technical side of things, Pantera changed the way records sound today. We upped the ante on production at the time. That was really based around Dimebag’s guitar sound. He always had a ferocious guitar sound but it was the late ‘80s when we recorded ‘Cowboys From Hell’ and production was at a very strange point in time. The was no Pro Tools and no computer bells and whistles, so we were really recording stuff the real way. It was all based around getting that guitar sound organically, man. We really changed things right there.

Let’s talk about the Pantera reissue of ‘Cowboys From Hell.’ It’s hard to believe that it has been 20 years. How involved with the re-release were you and what can fans expect?

I tell ya what, man. I know it is coming out in a lot of different formats and I have seen ‘The Ultimate Set’ and it is really, really, really kickass! I gotta admit it, man! They dug up old pictures, Rex, Vinnie and myself contributed with some liner notes, some old memories that we had in regards to writing that record, what we were thinking and what was going on, etcetra. The packaging is really killer. I don’t know, for any collector out there and if I were a collector and loved the band that wanted every little thing — I think it would be an awesome thing to have.

Looking back on the making of ‘Cowboys from Hell,’ did you have any idea that the album would have the impact that it has?

Straight up, NO WAY! Heck no.

What was the biggest challenge in making that epic record?

I guess it was like I was saying. To get that guitar sound roaring, because at that time, we had taken over the club scene, Pantera had. Regionally and in Texas, the live shows were insane to say the least. We had that live energy. I think capturing that live energy and that feel and putting it on the record was our main goal as well as our biggest obstacle. If you listen to ‘Cowboys From Hell’ and then to ‘Vulgar Display of Power,’ you can hear our sound evolving slowly, ya know. Especially with Terry Date. Terry Date was a great producer. Without him, there is no way we could have achieved those awesome sounds.

Do you have anything that stands out as a fond memory from that time period?

Well, I mentioned those live shows. We had written 99 percent of that material, anywhere between 1988 and 1989. We recorded in late ‘89. We record ‘Cowboys From Hell,’ I can almost name the date because it was when Mike Tyson got knocked out, lost for the first time to Buster Douglass, I will never forget it. I almost couldn’t finish the record! [laughs] Anyway … what was the question, man?

What was the fondest memory from that time period?

Ohhhh man! I just gave you the worst memory! [laughs] How did that pop out? [laughs] Well, once again, one of my favorite memories from that record is ‘Primal Concrete Sledge’ coming out of nowhere. Vinnie Paul came up with this awesome drum pattern and me and Darell were just staring at each other saying “Man, that is kickass!” He started looking at his guitar and I was like “Come on! Do something! Do something!” The next thing you know, he just starts chugging and everything just fell together! It really did! That was an awesome, awesome thing. It also shows where we were heading mentally. Just to backtrack one second, like I said, most of stuff was written in ‘88-’89. We were moving forward. So once again, I can’t stress enough how ‘Primal Concrete Sledge’ was that springboard in between ‘Cowboys From Hell’ and ‘Vulgar Display of Power.’

Dimebag Darrell and Phil Anselmo

We obviously can’t talk about Pantera without talking about Dimebag Darrell’s untimely passing. It has been five years and you guys are putting together this commemorative release together. It is clear that his death has had a major impact on you. Is it getting any easier for you as time passes?

No. As a matter of fact, in a strange way, you kinda just took the words out of my mouth and asked the right question. No. Every year gets harder. Every year, when the dates roll by it gets harder and this past year has been the hardest year of all. I think initially, the first year, two years … [pauses] I don’t know how long. It was just such a shock. It is very hard to comprehend, but I get it now. I get it now. I understand. Sure, I think about what could be. Yes, I think about Dimebag every day of my life. Every waking day of my life, man. So, no. It doesn’t get any easier.

You have had a love/hate relationship with the “rock media” for years? What are your thoughts on that part of the industry these days and your relationship with it?

Well, honestly it has a whole lot to do with my attitude. I think for many, many, many years I was a wounded animal lashing out. I was making a lot of mistakes with medication, drugs and alcohol. I was just fucking … [pauses] pardon the F-bomb … but I was just fucking out of my mind and I was really lashing out. After major back surgery, and that is a heck of a struggle, to come back from that both physically and mentally, today I am in a much better place. It is like what I give is what I get back. With the press, when I would fly off at the mouth, the press would eat it alive. Good or bad. I learned that lesson a few different times after being suckered into different confrontational things via different articles or different things in magazines and whatnot. Hence my silence after Dimebag’s passing. There was no way I was ready to have a microphone shoved in my face. That is why I shut myself off for a long while. I have had interviewers, not many, I have definitely had a couple that try to wind me up with questions, that are designed to do just that. But hey man, it is tough to fool the ol’ fat now. You can’t fuck … with me.

What is the biggest misconception about yourself?

[sighs] Where do I start?

You have been working on your autobiography. Is that your way of shedding some light on the man behind the person we see in the limelight?

Sure! That is an interesting thing to bring up. Writing a book is a very interesting process because you get to go through and find out for yourself what fueled the man as a youngster and all the little different things that happened in succession where you put one foot in front of the other and the next thing you know, you are doing the 20-year anniversary of your first record, ya know?! So it’s like “How the heck did I get to be 42 years old?!” It’s a hell of a story.

Definitely.

I guess the biggest misconception will be deduced by the people from whatever I put out, because I am going to tell the truth. I’m going to be subjective and I am going to come from the gut and from the heart. Look forward to reading that sucker. I have been working tediously on the thing but I am very particular, so don’t look for it next week or anything, but it’s coming.

Looking back on your career, is there anything you would do again differently if you had the chance?

Well, I get that question every now and again and, I tell ya what, I would have probably kept the partying down until after the show, so that all of the crazy jumping and physical exertion on stage would have been “in check.” I probably would have done some more sit-ups and some more corework … [laughs] and maybe I would have landed it better and maybe I would have made some more decisive decisions while stage diving! Ya know, sometimes that can be into the waiting arms of the crowd or the lovely concrete 7 feet below! [laughs] I have done both! [laughs] I would have been a little more careful there!

There have been rumors of a solo album from you circulating in the fan community. Can you elaborate on that at all and how do you envision a Phil Anselmo solo album sounding?

Well, it’s vicious. I have been in so many different side projects, I like to say that not all of them sound alike. With that being said, there is no way I would want to rehash anything traditional, so to speak. I’m gonna touch on tradition, ya know. Tradition is distorted guitar, drums, bass. But yes, I have been writing new stuff. Yes, it is super motherfuckin’ aggressive. It’s at its beginning points man but I got over 10 things that are close. I can’t give you a timeline, but I think, little by little, I might leak some here or there when it is done. I will just let people take it in how they want but, once again, I know heavy music. I see where heavy music is. I want to take heavy music like a ball of clay and reshape it, if you catch me. Reshape it differently than it has been shaped before. That is where I am at right now.

What is the best piece of advice you would give to aspiring musicians out there who want to make a career in the industry like you have?

Don’t stop. Just be completely dedicated to your instrument, whatever it may be, to your unit of people. Take practice dead serious. Play as many shows as you possibly can with the same lineup of people. Keep an open mind as far as your influences go. Look, I know there are a lot of genre bands out there. That’s fine. If you want to play “Death Vomit Core,” that’s great! Just be the best at it! Keep churnin’! If you want to play pop music, be the best at it. When I say that, it is easy for it to come out of the mouth, but just be prepared mentally and physically to be on that stage and doing your best. 150,000 percent every night.

I know we are a little pressed for time, but is there anything that you want to say to the fans and let them know before I let you go?

Heck yeah! New Arson Anthem coming out October 12th, 2010. Thirty minutes, 17 songs, old school hardcore. I know many people have heard that before but I think this record is awesome! It’s Mike Williams from Eyehategod singing. I play guitar, yes I do! Hank III plays drums and, goddamn, does he play drums! My boy, Colin Yeo, the singer from Pony Killer, plays bass. It is BRUTAL! After that, look for haarp. ‘The Filth’ is the name of the record, out on Housecore Records, which is my record label. Aside from that, I love all of you people out there. Thanks for all of the dedication and all of the kind words. I read them every now and again on the comment boards. I really, really, really love ya. I really love ya, man. I appreciate the support and wish nothing but good for everybody!

Thanks for your time, Phil. We will be spreading the word and will be talking to you again really soon.

Thanks, man. I appreciate the fuck out of it, man! Be cool!

– –

For more information on all of  Phil Anselmo’s projects, check out:

www.housecorerecords.com

www.philanselmo.com

www.down-nola.com

www.pantera.com

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Hank Williams III: Crazed County (and Metal) Rebel

Hank Williams III: Crazed County (and Metal) Rebel

hank3smokingYou?d be hard pressed to find a more diverse musician than Hank Williams III. In addition to being one of the few today carrying the torch for his grandfather and the other great country outlaws, he played bass in former Pantera vocalist Phil Anselmo?s hardcore/metal band Superjoint Ritual. His other band, Assjack, which splits the bill with his country act when he?s on tour, nicely fits into the same genre. And he has even more on his plate, including a new project with Anselmo, as he told Jason Price of Live-Metal.net in a recent interview.

Live-Metal: You just released a new record entitled Straight to Hell. The approach to this release is very “do it yourself.” What can you tell us about the process you used on the record?

Hank III: Well, just trying to set an example to a lot of bands really, that you don’t have to spend $200,000 on a record and be in debt to your label forever. In general, any band should have a little recording tool like that or songwriters should have one, ?cause they?re really easy to use, man. I used them with us to Superjoint Ritual and on all kinds of crazy intense, loud music, and they capture a pretty good sound. They are pretty easy to run, you don’t have to ? it’s not like running Protools or anything like that. So that was the main thing. The band creating our own sound kinda, a little bit, ya know… it took it to another level on just the air quality really.

Straight to Hell is a two-disc album with distinctly different sounds. Do you consider it two separate albums?

Well the first one is done right. It’s got all the superpickers on it and all that stuff. The second one is just my way of having fun. A bunch of ambient noise, more stripped down versions of songs, just me and my guitar, recorded on a tape deck. So it’s not as many tricks as on the other one. It is just more straight-up “real.”

The album was delayed numerous times before it was released. How long go did you actually record it?

Yeah. It was recorded about five, six months before it came out, but that just goes back to “the machine” and Wal-Mart and corporate bullshit.

Originally you were set to release an album called Thrown Out of Every Bar on Curb Records.

Yeah, I just changed the title. That’s all. It all struck me that Straight to Hell would be more fitting with the way the year is. The year of the devil and all that shit lining up, so that was the main reason for switching it.

Your music seems to be evolving with each release that you put out. How do you see you music changing with your future releases?

I think it is more of a step in a direction that captures what we are. I mean, as far as us being a little rough around the edges, ya know. This record definitely captures that a lot more then the earlier ones ?cause ? I don’t know ? ?cause we weren’t able to be ourselves as much. The kind of crowd we attract, I mean some of them are straight-up Americans, but a lot of them are the kids in black and the hellraisers and partiers and all that stuff, the more rebel kind of crowd.

Do you get a lot of pressure to tone down anything that you record from your label?

No, not anymore. They know I have been in the courtroom for the last four and a half years with them for a reason, and that is the key. Respect us for what we are, ya know. Everybody else can fit in the mold. There’s 125 bands that can fit in the mold around here, so it’s OK for one of them to go against the grain and then for them to halfway respect us, man … So … Getting there.

You have a song on Straight to Hell entitled “Country Heroes.” Can you tell us a little bit about that?

It’s for a lot of the kids that come out to the shows that don’t even listen to country music, and it’s just kind of a name dropping song to let them know, “Here are some guys that you can maybe get into,” ya know. Some of them have some dark topics … That is for the younger ones. For the older fans, that kind of song is for the kind of guy that is dealing with his problems. That’s his psychiatrist is the music, man. That is just what it is, man, just talking about getting away a little bit. Getting wasted with ’em and getting through hard times. That is pretty much it, man.

With that said, who are some of your rock or metal heroes?

Hank III: Well as far as slowness goes, it was definitely Buzz Osborne from The Melvins. Matt Pike from Sleep and High On Fire. Then it, uhhhh, shoot, I mean I had so many, man, ya know. I got to see Pantera, fuckin’ almost like 9 times in a 500-seat club in ?90-?93, never saw them in the amphitheater, man, so those guys always hit pretty hard. Just tons, man … I just had so much, from Black Flag to Cro-Mags to noise music like MELT-BANANA and stuff. Just all kinds. It?s hard for me to hone in on one.

When you first started playing music, which came to you first, the country side or the rock side?

Drums. I got my first drumset when I was 10 years old and listened to Black Sabbath, KISS and ZZ Top records to go along with it. So that created my love for the heavy stuff. And everything kept getting heavier and darker, and I kept going more with it. So it was definitely the harder stuff first and still to this day, ya know. Got in to the country when I was probably, I guess, 21 or 22 maybe playing some shows here and there.

How did you first get together with the band you are currently with now? Are these guys you have know for a while or grew up with?

No man, my band always comes and goes. It’s not like this band is called The Melvins. This band is called Hank Three and Assjack or whatever. So my players come and go, man. For the ones that stick with us for a little bit, much respect to ’em and that’s just the way it is. Most of them are from out of state and they hang in there until they’re sick of it and it’s time to move on. That’s pretty much it.

Is it hard to find musicians that are willing to play both styles of music together? Do they seek you out?

Yeah. They kinda seek me out but it goes back to just holdings the ads and nowadays, I at least got a bit more of a grip on it. You know if people want to … Thank God for Myspace is all I can say. You know a lot of different musicians have hit me up on there, ya know, whenever the time is needed. So I definitely have a good list to pick from now.

When you first started doing your “Jekyll and Hyde” style show, what type of reaction did you get? Was it a surprise to you?

Not a surprise to me. It just depends what kind of club we were playing really, man. You know, if we were playing a boot scoot bar in fuckin’ Texas, more than likely there is going to be a little bit of a problem before the nights over. And that was back before we were getting the respect of the rock clubs, and then we finally got the respect of the rock clubs and everything was OK to a point. Ya know, fights are more common in rock clubs and they know how to deal with it better. Opposed to a bunch of rednecks that don’t know what the fuck is going on, you know, trying to control people, I guess. So it has definitely gotten better over the years and it is not as much of a surprise as it used to be. So nowadays it is kind of expected.

What are some of your favorite songs to play live?

Ah man, um, right now one called “Black Destiny” in the Assjack set. It depends if I have a country voice or not really on that particular day. Maybe “Smoke and Wine,” “Dick in Dixie,” some of the more upbeat songs, ya know, but every night it?s different. It kinda depends.

You have always had a good relationship with bootleggers documenting your shows.

Yeah.

You have even released some bootlegs of your own in the past. Do you have any plans on releasing any official bootlegs?

Yeah, once my time is done with Curb, I will definitely have quite the bootleg set coming out. So, it?s gonna go even back to when I was 11 years old. It’s gonna be cool, man, It’s going to be different. It’s gonna be very hands on, very “D-I-Y.”

What do you have planned next as far as releases?

I think Assjack will be the next record that is gonna come out, so we can finally get a rock record out there. Then another country album. That is the way it is set up in the business.

What is going on with Superjoint Ritual?

Superjoint is in the grave right now, because someone tried bossing the boss and you NEVER boss the boss. Now he had to learn the hard way so Philip has laid that band to rest. It might come back. I seriously doubt it. But in the meantime Down is working on their new record and getting ready to be touring here soon. I’ve got another side project with Philip. I?m playing drums and Philip’s is playing guitar. Mike Williams from Eyehategod is screamin’ and it’s called Arson Anthem. So far we’ve got eight songs of it recorded. So we?re still having fun and making music, just getting in there and jammin’, man.

In the past you have talked about the fact that you cannot hear true “country” on the radio anymore, so what are you thoughts on “rock radio” in general?

Man, I am so ? I don’t listen to radio anymore, man. If I do, it?s Internet radio. That?s all I can say, Internet radio, the Sirius and the XMs are making a difference. They?re playing the old and they?re paying the new. Format radio is still shabby. It?s still basically pay for play formatted and they?re not mixin’ it up. Maybe a few stations are, but the majority of them are kinda the same old same old. But, like I said, you?re talking to somebody who has given up on that a long time ago. If I do listen to anything, it’s on the Internet.

Is there anything that you are currently listening to that fans of yours might be into?

Man, here lately I have been listening to a lot of the old Wicked Angel, Bedemon, Pentagram, a lot of Jimmy Martin, that’s bluegrass. On the harder stuff, there?s a band called CSA, that’s Confederate States of America. It’s kinda like Down but it’s not. A lot of what I like is from these young kids man. Every show I do I get local bands giving me their CDs, a lot of them are pretty damn good. There is a band out of Lincoln, Nebraska called The Saints, that I am freakin’ out over. Those Poor Bastards out of Madison, Wisconsin, its like “goth country,” hasn’t really been done yet.

You do a cover of one of their (Those Poor Bastards) songs on your album, don’t you?

Yes. Yes I do. I met that kid after a Superjoint show. He just walked up to me and said, ?Hey man, here’s something I do. You might like it, you might hate it, however.” And next thing I knew it had been a year and a half and that thing, you know, was all I was listening to. So they definitely hit me pretty hard, man. They have quite the future ahead of them, I am sure, or I hope. So, it’s just unknown territory, so I guess that?s why it strikes me so hard.

Anything that you would like to say to your fans?

Just check us out. We’ll be out there doing our Jekyll and Hyde, our country, a little bit of hellbilly and the Assjack for a while and we’ll be seeing ya on the road, man. Check our dates at Hank3.com or Pollstar.com. We’ll be out there for hopefully another 25 years.

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