Tag Archive | "wes borland"

Wes Borland Releases New Experimental Single, “Matadors & Daughters” From Upcoming ‘Astral Hand’ LP

Wes Borland Releases New Experimental Single, “Matadors & Daughters” From Upcoming ‘Astral Hand’ LP

Wes Borland releases ‘Matadors & Daughters’, the first single from his upcoming solo album. The single includes ‘Arcturus’ on the B-side and is among the new music that Borland will debut as part of his 4-hour durational performance at Moogfest 2018 in Durham, North Carolina, May 17-20 featuring a custom-built sonic rig. While the single is out today, the new material will be featured on the LP “Astral Hand” via Borland’s own imprint, Edison Sound, and be distributed by The Orchard in the fall of 2018.  The single premiered yesterday via Rolling Stone who calls ‘Matador & Daughters’phantasmagoric” while ‘Arcturus’  is a more “umbral, cinematic B-side.”

Listen to single ‘Matadors & Daughters’ and the B-side ‘Arcturus’:
SPOTIFY | iTUNES | SOUNDCLOUD

Matadors & Daughters’ provides a bridge between Borland’s work on his 2016 electronic rock album, “Crystal Machete and his commissioned work for Moogfest. Although the new material is slightly different and follows a more conventional song pattern, it still adheres to the same rules Borland imposed on himself for “Crystal Machete“: no unprocessed vocals, no outside help from anyone else, and no distorted guitar. “The voice rule was inspired by artists like Planningtorock, Air, Daft Punk and Aphex Twin”, Borland explains. “I want the vocals to be androgynous, between male and female. I want them to sit in that uncanny valley between human and not, not male or female, not human or electronic. Rule 2 was distorted guitars. For some reason I have no problem cranking out riff after riff, it’s like a conveyor belt in my head. It’s no challenge to write one. I wanted to disable that option. The third one, no help from outside sources was set up to challenge myself to be a better musician and engineer. The only outside help I had was mastering.

This new set of music also adheres to two additional rules. “Every single song has to have something in it that comes from Wagner’s Ring cycle — an idea or thought, or some musical element, something to me, that I’ve filtered through the Ring cycle, any of the four. And also Jan Hammer’s score to Miami Vice. That score plus something from Wagner, something from both, has to be present in every single single.

In addition to debuting new songs at Moogfest, Borland is presenting a custom sonic rig central to his performance. Describing the rig, Borland says, that “It’s basically multiple delay pedals and loopers and samplers going into a small mixing console which goes into a main sampler/looper. I’ve set up tons of instruments and made railroad tracks that come together to a central hub where I can record a loop of those things and have it run and then play over it and then have other stations that have their own loopers playing  by themselves and I can enjoy the imperfection of those things overlapping each other. I’m set up for all kinds of things to happen, including accidents.” The durational will mostly be a solo performance but will include support from Alex Rosson, former head of audio at Detroit’s Shinola and the ears and vision behind Audeze headphones. It was Rosson who introduced Borland to the Moog team (and director J.J. Abrahams), at dinner one night during which they invited Borland to perform. “Thank goodness they saw in me what I did outside of Bizkit,” Borland says of the invitation. “They’re very open minded.

This is precisely where Borland wants to be. Originally known for his work as a guitarist in 1990s rap-rock juggernaut, Limp Bizkit, Borland has increasingly established himself as a dynamic, experimental artist since leaving Limp Bizkit in 2001 through various solo and collaborative albums and projects, including industrial and metal bands Black Light Burns, Big Dumb Face, and supergroup The Damning Well (with members of Nine Inch Nails, Filter, and A Perfect Circle). “I think when you’re primarily known for songs you wrote when you were 24, it’s ridiculous that that’s it, that’s the snapshot of you in the world forever,” Borland says. “Any growth after that is looked at sideways, so it’s important to be extra good. I try to make everything I do be significant and impactful, to make people who are pigeonholing you go, ‘Oh, I like this.’ And for people who are all ‘Who do you think you are, you are some dumb alien frat boy from Limp Bizkit, we hate you,’ for them to go, ‘I accidentally listened to something this dude did and it’s actually good.’ That’s what I’m aiming for: someone with good taste in music accidentally listening to me and going, ‘Oh, I was wrong.’”

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Greg Prato Examines Two Legendary Bands In ‘The Faith No More & Mr. Bungle Companion’

Greg Prato Examines Two Legendary Bands In ‘The Faith No More & Mr. Bungle Companion’

Two musical legends, one book!

Two musical legends, one book!

Despite being listed as an influence on countless notable bands, there has neverbeen a book that tells the complete story of both Faith No More and Mr. Bungle. Until now. Author/journalist Greg Prato‘s tenth book overall, ‘The Faith No More& Mr. Bungle Companion,’ serves as both a career overview and analyzation of both bands – tracing their ups and downs, uncovering quite a few unheard or uncommon tales, and of course, telling the stories behind such classic albums as ‘The Real Thing,’ ‘Angel Dust,’ ‘Disco Volante,’ and ‘California.’

And many members of today’s top rock bands offer up opinions and memories of Faith No More and Mr. Bungle exclusively for this book, including Jason Newsted (Newsted/ex-Metallica), Max Cavalera (Soulfly/ex-Sepultura), Kim Thayil (Soundgarden), Devin Townsend (Devin Townsend Project/ex-Strapping Young Lad), Ville Valo (HIM), Johnny Christ (Avenged Sevenfold), Gilby Clarke (ex-Guns N’Roses), Travis Stever (Coheed and Cambria), Angelo Moore (Fishbone), John Garcia (Vista Chino/ex-Kyuss), Wes Borland (Black Light Burns/Limp Bizkit), Everlast (House of Pain/solo artist), Mike Fleischmann (Vision of Disorder), Mitts (Madball), and Jeff Walker (Carcass).

Prato writes for Rolling Stone, and has penned such popular and critically acclaimed music book titles as ‘Grunge is Dead: The Oral History of Seattle Rock Music,’ ‘A Devil on One Shoulder and an Angel on the Other: The Story of Shannon Hoon and Blind Melon,’ ‘The Eric Carr Story,’ ‘Too High to Die: Meet the Meat Puppets,’ and ‘MTV Ruled the World: The Early Years of Music Video,’ among others. He is also a long-time fan of both bands – having interviewed every single Faith No More member who appeared on record over the years (of whichexcerpts from these interviews are included in this book), and having witnessedcountless FNM and Bungle performances over the years.

Available as both a paperback version [$14.99, 210 pages] and a Kindle download [$6.99, 189 pages], ‘The Faith No More & Mr. Bungle Companion’ helps put it all into perspective for fans of both bands.

For ordering info, click:

Paperback:  http://amzn.com/1493696661
Kindle:  http://amzn.com/B00GUTNAZM

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Rap Phenom Tech N9ne Discusses His Roots And New Metal-Edged EP “Therapy”

Rap Phenom Tech N9ne Discusses His Roots And New Metal-Edged EP “Therapy”

tech-n9ne-feature-2013

Since first bursting on to the scene in 1990, TECH N9NE has risen through the ranks to become the most successful independent rapper. With well over two million records, garnered universal critical acclaim, scored a gold record for the single ‘Caribou Lou’, this self-made creative force has been sought out for collaborations by everybody from Lil Wayne to Five Finger Death Punch, and continues to pack venues worldwide. His latest studio album, “Something Else,” debuted #4 on Billboard 200 this past August. To top off a tremendous 2013, this rap mogul was recently named in Forbes’ “Hip-Hop Cash Kings” alongside Sean “Diddy” Combs, Dr. Dre and Jay-Z.

With so many amazing achievements already under his belt, Tech N9ne is taking a moment for a little “Therapy”. Therapy means something different to everybody. For some, it involves sitting in an overpriced shrink’s office and lamenting life’s trials and tribulations for an hour. For others, it’s as simple as swinging a golf club or hitting a punching bag. As with everything, TECH N9NE possesses his own perception of therapy, and that’s codified in his new metal-tinged, aggressive 11-track 2013 EP which hits stores November 5th via Strange Music. “Therapy” is produced by legendary rock producer Ross Robinson (Korn, Slipknot) to achieve a hard-hitting, instrument-driven sound unlike anything else he’d previously done over the course of thirteen full-length studio albums. Top-notch musicians such as Wes Borland of Limp Bizkit and Glassjaw’s Sammy Siegler built the sonic foundation for many of the tracks alongside longtime producer Seven’s beats. Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with Tech N9ne to discuss his musical roots, his “Therapy” session with legendary producer Ross Robinson and much more!

You have spent years making a name for yourself and taking the world by storm. Going back to the beginning, how did music first come into your life and what inspired you early on?

Tech N9ne

Tech N9ne

I was a young guy living in the Wayne Miner projects around the time I was four years old. I remember hearing my neighbors playing rap music right next door. My aunties and uncles, my mother and everyone who stayed at my grandmother’s place played gospel music every morning. They were really religious people. There was Shirley Caesar every morning! There was a mixture of all types of music in my life. My uncles played rock ‘n’ roll back then and introduced me to Elton John, Led Zeppelin and stuff like that. I had very eclectic music tastes when I was a young kid in the ghetto. It is a beautiful thing and I use everything they taught me. It started as simply as beating on the table at breakfast time. Everybody was beating on cups and bowls making rhythms. I would watch them and see everyone smiling and enjoying each other. It really captivated me. My family taught me rhythm at an early age and now it is my weapon of choice. It puts me in a league of my own. That is the narcissist in me talking but that is what I feel like! [laughs] It started early on at four or five. Everything I grew up listening to, whether it be Falco’s “Amadeus” or whatever else we sampled through the years came from the songs I grew up listening to. I grew up listening and studying these songs. Thank God for my families teaching me harmonies, octaves and exposing me to the choir and The Little Sunshine Band when I was very young. I want to thank them for exposing me to all of that because I use all of it to this very day; the rhythm, the harmoies, the rhythm, the rock ‘n’ roll, the hip hop and the gospel! It is all in my music. It is really wonderful to think about! We just did a gospel song on Stevie Stone’s new album, “Two Birds, One Stone.” The song is called “Baptism.” I have another song called “Holier Than Thou” and it is so awesome we can do that, man! All of those elements are still there inside of me!

Those earlier influences helped to fuel your amazing career. Did you always know music was going to be your career path?

Actually, I wanted to be a psychiatrist before I started rapping! I really wanted to study people and their thoughts. Oddly enough, I became a psychiatrist and therapist to my fans. Many of them say I get them through. Some of them say I made them not commit suicide or got them through Afghanistan. They say I have helped people when they are on their death bed, you know what I mean? I have managed to make music that soothes people. I got both of my wishes — my rap world wish and my psychiatrist wish. I laugh about it all of the time! I think “Wow! I am my fan’s psychiatrist!” I wanted to be there! I wanted to be a psychiatrist before I rapped and it was the road I was going to take.

That leads us to your latest release. The album is titled “Therapy.” When you first started to plot the course for this album, what goals did you hope to achieve?

Tech N9ne

Tech N9ne

I had no idea what I was going to accomplish because it was a different atmosphere and a different place. It was so out of my comfortable. I did have my producer, Seven, there which was comfortable to have but I had no idea what was going to come forth. I had no idea what Ross Robinson was going to do with the beats when he brought people in, what was going to happen or even if it would work at all. My God, it worked! I brought so many more things out of me on Venice Beach that I don’t think that would have come out of me at home, which is my comfort zone. This was totally out of my comfort zone and rightly so. It was my own therapy session and I am typically my own therapist. It was going to feel funny when Ross Robinson was having you drain these ideas from inside and you have to spit it out in front of Wes Borland, the engineer, DJ Starscream of Slipknot and everyone else who was there listening. Usually, I keep it to myself and put it in my recorder but this time I had to tell everybody, even if it was stupid. It was uncomfortable but it was therapeutic at the same time. It really broke the nervous seal that I had the first couple of days. It turned into a family. It was really great to have a great therapist like Ross Robinson.

You touched on it a bit but how did approaching this record affect the way you typically write your songs?

I actually sat on the beach, in the sand and looked at the water, man. What do you, a song named “Stop The Sailor” came out! The first day we were working, Wes Borland was there playing guitar and Sammy Siegler was on the drums. Ross had me, Seven, Sammy and Wes in the same room and I was recording while they’re playing “Stop The Sailor.” Ross asked “What made you write this song?” Wes Borland said “Because the water is right there!” [laughs] It was really funny! I was like “Yeah, he’s right! Know what I’m saying?”

How would you describe this project sonically in a few words?

It is there on this EP, man. It is divine, dark, confused, frustrating, cocky and it is human.

tech-n9nje-2013-3

As you said, this was a therapy session for you. What did you learn about yourself in the process?

I learned I need to keep some things in when it comes to my past loved ones. Ross brings everything out of you, so I might have said some stuff that I shouldn’t have said on some songs. I learned I should muffle myself a little bit more but I am not good at that! [laughs] I am just not good at muffling. If the beat moves me to say something personal, I might have to say it! I learned that I am totally transparent, dog. I am truly see-through, man. I am an open book. This process solidified that for me. It was being down there for a two week therapy session. It had to broken up in the release of something else, so I would have to leave the studio to do press and support the release. That would totally take me to another world and then I would go back to the beach and get back into my creative mode. I had to block everything out. There are a lot of stresses of this new world that I am in, the radio world; They want to play my music now after all of these years! This new world is kinda weird! Ya know what I’m sayin’? I couldn’t wait to get back down there to Ross’ studio to see what was going to come out. I really had no idea! The beats moved me, so I was just as excited as the next person, like “What is he going to say?”

You have been doing music for years and have established yourself as an underground icon. How are you adjusting to your newfound mainstream fame?

Tech N9ne

Tech N9ne

It is weird but I know it is needed if I want to achieve world domination. I go because my goal has always been world domination. It is out of my comfort zone and I don’t like it as much. I mean, I like my comfort zone but sometimes you have to get out of it. My comfort zone is right here where I am right now — on tour or in the studio. All the stuff you have to do in support of it, I have never been a fan of, like going and talking at the radio stations and everything. I have never really been a fan of it but I know it is needed, man. I just want everybody to hear my music, so whatever device they have to get it to the people, I have to get it on there, whether it be TV or radio, That is one thing we have done all this without! I am thinking that if I have those two elements, which we never had in the past, it is possible to take over the world and win everybody’s heart. It is just so different. It’s like they own you for the moment and everybody is swinging.

Do you feel there are any misconceptions out there about yourself at this point in your career?

Oh yeah, totally! Some of my fans feel like because my music is on the radio that I have sold out. Oh no, no, no! I told them a long time ago that Tech won’t go mainstream, mainstream will go Tech. That is what is happening. When I wrote the song “Fragile” about certain journalists, I didn’t plan for that to be on the radio but people want to play it. It is not a radio formatted song, it is the fact that it is that good that people want to play it. I think that is the natural way — if you like it, play it. I didn’t have to conform or do anything to get on the radio. I did music I felt or people I felt to do it with. There are people who want to keep me to themselves and I understand that too. There are some fans who don’t want me to be on TV or radio because they might feel like I am their best kept secret but this music needs to spread to the rest of the world! Share me because I am taking this everywhere!

Musical exploration has always been a huge part of what you do. Where do you see your music heading in the future?

I think it will be better and more intricate. It is going to become harder for me because it will become more intricate than it is now — intricate overload, man! I don’t know! I am such a shell. It is my brain and my spirit that will take me to where I am going to go. I don’t know what to expect. “Therapy” is a great example of that because it is something unexpected that came out of me. I have no idea where I have to go next but I do know it will have to be even bigger and better. I have to do that every time, that is all I know!

Looking back on your life and career, what is the best lesson that you have learned along the way?

Tech N9ne

Tech N9ne

The best lesson I could have ever could have received was from Quincy Jones. It was back in 1997 at his home in Bel Air, right under the Michael Jackson “Thriller” plaque that says 50 million sold. I was sitting right below that on the couch. He said to me, “Tech, rap what you know and people will forever feel you.” I didn’t think about it then but as I started getting into this and started rapping what I knew from my life, I started connecting with people. When I say those two words, “Do you.” it means so much. DO YOU! These are another person like you somewhere who can connect in a similar way. Quincy Jones telling me to rap what I know was so real, man. I was so glad I was able to tap into it. I was like “Oh yeah, I will write me life.” I don’t mean that in a conceited way, like “Oh, I am the shit! I am this, I am that…” I just wrote about my life and what I was going through and people connected. He was so right. I have fans because he told me what to do back in 1997!

We are just scratching the surface with you here today, Tech. Where are the best places for people to learn more about you and your story online?

You can catch me on Twitter at @TechN9ne. I am on Instagram at instragram.com/therealtechn9ne. If you want to know anything about Tech Nine, you can visit www.therealtechn9ne.com. Everything is on there from tour dates to merchandise and everything in between. It is all there! That is me — Tech N9ne and that’s the game!

Mark your calendar’s and pick up Tech N9ne’s “Therapy” EP which hits stores November 5th via Strange Music.

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Limp Bizkit Drops New Video “Ready To Go” Featuring Lil’ Wayne

Limp Bizkit Drops New Video “Ready To Go” Featuring Lil’ Wayne

limp-bizkit-logo

Following in the footsteps of our nation’s greatest icons like President Obama and Trent Reznor of Nine Inch NailsFred Durst, ringleader of Grammy-nominated band Limp Bizkit, took to the  interwebs last night for his Reddit Ask Me Anything (AMA), where he dropped his new video with Lil’ Wayne for their single “Ready to Go” and responded to his fan’s most burning questions.

Below are some highlights of Fred Durst’s epic Reddit AMA session:

On his upcoming record Stampede of the Disco Elephants on Cash Money Records:

After months shrouded in mystery, Durst unveiled when we can expect to hear his upcoming Cash Money full-length: “You will probably never SEE a Stampede of the Disco Elephants but you will hear Stampede of the Disco Elephants (#SOTDE) in its entirety, the first quarter of 2014.”<

On choosing the band name Limp Bizkit:  

 Naturally a fan asked what we’ve always wondered – where did the name Limp Bizkit even come from? The truth is, Durst and the other band members wanted a name that was simultaneously bizarre and easy to remember. Seems like they picked a winner – especially considering they also came up with possible band names Blood Fart, Gimp Disco and Bitch Piglet! “The name Limp Bizkit came out in a riff session when deciding what to call the band. I wanted it to have the same roll off of the tongue as Led Zeppelin, but be so odd that you would have a hard time forgetting it. We never really took our name or purpose very serious considering the chances of succeeding were slim to none at that point.” 
On Eminem: 
 
When asked about his relationship with Detroit rapper Slim Shady, Fred expressed that he remains a loyal fan of Eminem’s music: “I choose to remember the good times we shared. He is definitely one of the very few best rappers of all time.”
On a possible Three Dollar Bill,Yall$ Reunion Tour:
Durst clarifies: “That’s a false rumor.”
On the true meaning of a “chocolate starfish”:
You’ll just have to check Fred Durst’s Reddit AMA Session to find out yourself.
Although rock bands and rap artists have collaborated since the early ‘80s, there’s nothing old-school about what you’re about to hear on Limp Bizkit’s new single “Ready To Go” featuring  Lil Wayne. The multi Grammy-Award-Winning New Orleans rapper showed his rock n’ roll streak on guitar-infused album Rebirth (2010), so it makes sense that the legendary American rock band Limp Bizkit, world-renowned for heated hard rock classics like “Nookie” and “3 Dollar Bill, Yall$”, would team up with the heralded rapper and Cash Money labelmate. “Ready To Go” marks the first single off Limp Bizkit’s forthcoming full-length release Stampede of the Disco Elephants, out Fall 2013 onCash Money Records.
The single offers up a taste of what’s to come from the rock titans-Fred Durst [vocals], Wes Borland [guitars], Sam Rivers [bass], and John Otto [drums].  Boasting production from Polow da Don [Chris Brown, Pitbull], the cut is a brutal, mosh-worthy riffage and fierce scratching ensues alongside funked up bass and frenetic drumming.  Paired with Lil Wayne’s rapidfire mic wrecking, “Ready To Go” strikes the ideal balance between scorching hip-hop and bombastic hard rock.
“Ready To Go” smashed iTunes charts the first week of its April 16th release, snagging #4 on the iTunes Rock Song & Rock Album Chart and peaking at #1 on the iTunes Rock Song Chart. 
About “Ready To Go,” Durst comments, “We felt like it was a monster. This is a new chapter for us, and it’s exciting. We always knew we wanted Wayne on there, and he killed it. The track really represents a lot of the elements that make up Limp Bizkit and always have…We still wild out in our own way.”
Besides being packed with exciting collabos, hypnotic, disorienting lyricism, and party-driven, speaker-shattering rock production, Limp Bizkit’s forthcoming album signifies the first rock band to join a label roster packed with legendary acts including Drake, Nicki Minaj, Tyga, and Busta Rhymes. Limp Bizkit said it best themselves when they tweeted, “The [rap] game is missing danger, electricity & rock n’ roll!!! Cash Money Limp Bizkit.”
 
Get ready to remove the chain because this #$*%^ is off it. Limp Bizkit wants to know: Are you “Ready To Go?”

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Black Light Burns: Wes Borland Discusses The Creation of His Latest Album!

Black Light Burns: Wes Borland Discusses The Creation of His Latest Album!

Though best known as the larger than life guitarist of Limp Bizkit, Wes Borland is not one to be lumped into a particular category. He is also an accomplished painter and his skills as a versatile musician and songwriter are on full display with Black Light Burns, his the avant-garde alter ego. One of the hardest working musicians in the business, Borland let’s his creativity flow unfiltered with Black Light Burns which has never been more evident than with the band’s sophomore album “The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall” available from Rocket Science/THC: Music. This powerful band released its debut, “Cruel Melody,” in 2007 featuring Danny Lohner (NIN), Josh Eustis (Puscifer) and Josh Freese (Guns N’ Roses), and a much anticipated follow-up LP of covers and B-side material, 2008’s, “Cover Your Heart,” and an accompanying DVD entitled, The Anvil Pants Odyssey. In 2009, Borland and Black Light Burns hit the road for an extended run with industrial powerhouse, Combichrist, and contributed the track, “I Want You To,” to the Underworld: Rise of the Lycans soundtrack. BLB took a temporary hiatus while Borland stayed busy with a world tour with the reformed Limp Bizkit. In 2012 BLB returned, to the delight of fans, with the track, “It Rapes All In Its Path,” on the Underworld: Awakening soundtrack, and the announcement of the impending release of a new LP. The arrival of their new album, “The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall,” fans were far from disappointed. The powerful new album delivers a fifteen track journey in a darker side of Borland’s psyche than their previous full-length release. Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with Wes Borland to discuss the creation of this impressive album, the challenges her encountered along the way, the status of Limp Bizkit’s upcoming album and much more!

I have been following your career for well over a decade at this point and we’ve spoken several times. I wanted to go back to the beginning and have you tell us a little about your first memories of music and how it came into your life.

My first memories of music are my dad playing acoustic guitar in the house. I think he listened to John Denver a lot. [laughs] I think John Denver was probably the first music I heard. It was that and Jim Croce. My dad listened to a lot of folk stuff. For some reason, he had a Moody Blues record. It had tons of analog synthesizers on it and I thought that was awesome! I would put that Moody Blues record on and pretend I was breaking into some science fiction castle in the living room! I would go through all of these booby traps that I was making up in my mind and set up pillow trap doors and all of that stuff. [laughs] I guess my first experiences were dumb, funny and adventurous experiences.

That definitely foreshadowed what was to come!

Yes! [laughs]

The latest chapter in your life musically is “The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall” from Black Light Burns. When you were first starting out to make this record, what were your expectations?

Black Light Burns

The last song to make it on to “Cruel Melody,” which was the first Black Light Burns record, was the first song on the album, “Mesopotamia.” At that point, in my mind, that was the jumping off point of the band steering away from the industrial sound. There were still elements of that goth, industrial era of music but I really liked that sort of surfy, stroked, punk rock, more danceable rock element. I continued to write for this record immediately after “Cruel Melody.” When I was writing the first record, I just cut the songs off, even though I was still writing. I just thought, “OK! That’s the last one on the record. Everything from here on will be on the next one.” As the first record was being mixed, I was still writing constantly and coming up with ideas. I was even to the point where I knew that the first song of … Are you familiar with “Cruel Melody?”

Yes, I am.

The very last song on the record, after it fades out, there is a whispered, barely audible, couple of lines of poetry. Those lines are the beginning of “How To Look Naked.” It is the first half of the verse of that song on the end of “Cruel Melody.” I knew that was going to happen at the end of that record and I was continuing to write the new record. Everyone that worked on the first record had been involved with Nine Inch Nails at some point. We received a ton of criticism for sounding too much like Nails on the first record. That was a definite goal on this one was to steer away from that happening again. I am not really sure how it happened, it just kinda did. It’s not the worst thing in the world. So, there was that and I also wanted less of a metal sound. I wanted it to be heavy but not sound metal. Whenever things started to get heavy, I put a lot more emphasis in the bass being distorted, having the guitars be more overdriven or more twangy or bitey — a sort of Jesus Lizard-y sounding guitar attack. I think that was successful as far as being pulled off in that way and steering away from a muted metal sound. The other thing was to make a dynamic record that sounded less clean and more live. I wanted to keep some of the mistakes in and have everything be a little more crazed sounding and not as polished. This was because the songs on “Cruel Melody,” when we took them into a venue environment and we were actually playing them live, they got wilder and more gritty. I didn’t want that change from record to live to happen as drastically as it did on the first record. Right away, I wanted to have things sound unhinged, right off the bat.

Wes Borland of Black Light Burns

What is the significance of the title of the record?

“The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall” was the title of an instrumental idea, the last song on the record, which was written a few years ago. it kinda became the theme for writing the lyrics for the rest of the record. I had an experience where I was rock climbing, I was free climbing, and I got into a situation out in Joshua Tree National Park where they have these huge rock formations. I got stuck on top of this big rock formation. I had gone up a certain way and reached the top but I was exhausted and couldn’t get down. My friends that I was with didn’t know where I was. The sun started to go down and I could see coyotes running by and I realized I was in this oh shit situation. It took me a long time to find a way down. There were all of these moments on the rock where I thought I was literally going to fall off the rock and die or be severely injured. It never actually reached that tipping point of the moment I realized I was about to fall but it was very close many times. That theme of being on the edge and in constant fear, there is a beauty to that, where all of your senses are heightened. I also liked that the title could be taken so many different ways. It could be the moment that you realize you are going to fall in love or the moment you realize you are going to make a terrible decision that is going to affect the rest of your life. If you are a drug addict, it could mean the moment that you are going to give up your sobriety and fall back into drug use and being an addict and there is nothing you can do about it. It could mean if you are going to cheat on somebody or gamble your savings away. There are just so many different ways both positively and negatively that it could be taken that I thought it covered and fed a lot of the themes on the album lyrically.

How has your writing process evolved through the years? Are you doing anything differently these days?

“Cruel Melody,” even though I had demoed a lot of the songs myself, there were still a lot of guest appearances by people and collaborations. There were a lot of people putting their own two cents in. For this one, I really wanted to work in solitary and not have a lot of other people involved in it because I had a lot of ideas and directions that I wanted to take it. Working with other people in a collaborative manner, you can kinda skew what the original idea might have been. It can skew the direction of that and I wanted to make an album where I didn’t have to talk to anyone! [laughs] Basically, I just wanted to be alone with my thoughts and push the ideas in whatever direction they were going to go. The only time I actually was working with people was when we were doing drums and our guitar player played a little bit on a few of the songs but for the most part it was just me working by myself. I would have to come out of that every once and awhile and show it to other people and ask them what their thoughts were to try and get a perspective on where I was headed. That was really helpful for me in the process, you know, to be in a sort of cerebral isolation where I didn’t ever need to communicate verbally.

Wes Borland

That being said, what do you consider the biggest challenge along the way?

Probably just getting it finished and out because it took so long. Most of it was written a while back. I stopped writing for this record, probably, 2-and-a-half to 3 years ago. That was the end of the writing process. I have just been so busy with Limp Bizkit that I haven’t had time to put it out. I had thought about finishing it last year and putting it out but different things and commitments kept me from doing that. Finally, I said, “That’s enough! I am doing it this year!” [laughs] And, “Whatever the consequences are of having to juggle between two bands and different projects — I’ll take them and do it!”

You have also been hard at work on the video aspects of this project. What can we expect out of you in that realm?

We have released one video which was kind of an appetizer and an introduction in some ways to the record. I don’t know if you have seen the video but it takes place on a beach. That is the first chapter of three. The second one is being edited right now and that is going to be the largest video that we are doing for the record. The video is for “How To Look Naked” which is the first track on the record. The third video is going to be more akin to the first video, where it is not as huge of a production. It will be a lot simpler. That video will be for “The Color Escapes” which is the fifth song on the record.

It’s safe to assume you will be hitting the road soon in support of the new album. Have you already started planning what the live show might include visually and musically?

Yeah. There aren’t going to be a lot of visuals besides us doing our thing. It is going to be a stripped down, “Hi! We’re at your neighborhood bar!” kind of show! [laughs] The connection level with the audiences when we play shows is a lot more intimate because we are setting our gear up and talking to the audience before we even start the show, so that whole part is really interesting. Then when we end the show, we actually go off the front of the stage into the crowd until most people leave. It is a very intimate to be in venues like that and do the show the way we do it. During the show, we interact and are on fire the whole time. It is a wild experience. We are going to be changing the set up a lot this time because we have so much material to pull from now. I think we have rehearsed 18 to 20 songs from both records, as well as a couple of songs from the covers EP we did. There is quite a lot to look forward too.

One thing I always enjoy about your work is it is always growing and you seem to have no fear when it comes to exploring new territory. How do you feel you evolved as an artist since you first started out?

The two main things I have learned … The first thing is not to be pressured about anything. I think it is better to work really hard on something and if it flops, it flops. I can’t be afraid that people aren’t going to accept something or that something will be misconstrued. I just like to create and put out. Of course there is quality control. I am not just farting in a bucket, recording it and putting it out. I am trying to explore things that interest me with the hopes that other people will be interested also. The other thing is to not filter any idea. No matter how crazy something is, I don’t like to dull the edges of it. I like to try to see it through to the nth degree and not worry about people being offended or be scared of people thinking I am dumb or anything like that. I just try to be myself and try to not censor myself.

What does the future hold for Black Light Burns? Have you already given thought to moving it forward?

Yeah, I have actually. We go on tour in The States in about two-and-a-half weeks to do a run of shows. We are supposed to go back out in The States in November and then we are going to Europe in the beginning of next year, like the end of January and early-February. My next move with Black Light Burns is to hopefully put out a new EP within the next six months to a year. I don’t want to have four or five years go by between records again.

Another huge part of your life is Limp Bizkit. Do you mind if I touch on a few things there?

No. Not at all!

It’s been nearly six months since the band signed with Cash Money Records. How has that situation been treating you?

Wes Borland

It’s really cool! It is interesting to be involved with that whole Miami scene — to go down there and check out what they are doing. They are so smart, what they are doing and with the way they do things. There are so many levels of, “Why didn’t I think of that!” as far as how they take their lesser known artists and pair them with their more well known artists on a track and, before you know it, everybody is listening to it and they keep building up their roster that way. It is genius but so simple at the same time. It is also cool to be working with hip-hop producers and people who have a different perspective on music than I do. For instance, there is a producer that we have been working with down there named Detail, who is super on fire and is so cool and into all of this different stuff. Working with him is super inspiring in the way he works and just how fast he works. They are crazy! They stay up all night! I love it! It’s so weird! [laughs] The whole studio is completely dead during the day and around 10 p.m., all of this activity begins and Lil’ Wayne is showing up. We had Flo Rida show up one night. There are so many different heavyweight artists in that world who are just around and hanging out with each other to work on music, so that is really cool. So, we have been working on songs like that but we have also been making band type songs, heavy songs, in the studio. We kinda have two different directions going on right now and they are starting to blend into each other but I think the beginnings of a record are starting to happen and we are starting to see where it is going.

I am paraphrasing from the last time we spoke, but last time out, you said the band created “a Limp Bizkit record for Limp Bizkit fans.” As things start to materialize, do you find you are doing more exploration on this record?

Ya know, I think so. Fred [Durst] has been really open lately to trying new things. He wants to do something that sounds like us but is different and covers some new territory. So, yeah. I think there will hopefully be some great new ideas on this album. He was talking about how the Black Light Burns album, every track kinda flows into the next one at some point. He really likes that idea and experimenting more with that kinda stuff and more interludes and stuff like that happening.

Any time Limp Bizkit is in the news or there is a new development, people respond to it, either positively or negatively depending on the venue. What do you think it is about the band that still polarizes the people?

I don’t know. I don’t know why some people still hold onto it. I know some people have always hated it and are shocked that it is still around in some ways but we have really amazing fans, who are really dedicated to the band. They understand that even if you can’t stand the band, the songs are not terribly written songs. There is something there that keeps it from disappearing into that refrigerator buzz metal of the world, the stuff that all sorta sounds the same and is incestuous. I would much rather be polarizing than boring and have people say, “Oh, that’s boring. No thanks.” Limp Bizkit isn’t really easy to ignore and I think that bothers people a lot. The other thing is that we are still excited about doing this. We had a long break from each other and sorta got our shit together as far as realizing what our priorities are and how much we like doing what we do, especially the live shows. Even if you hate the band, if you come to a live show, I talk to people all of the time at festivals who say, “I really didn’t like you before but now I have seen you live and I get it!” That is a big part of why we do, what we do.

You certainly left your mark on the music landscape. As a career musician, what is the best piece of advice you would give to someone looking to make music their livelihood?

Practice a lot, don’t worry about what other people say and keep moving forward. It is so much harder to make it now then when I started as far as trying to get your head above a sea of over-saturated music that is out there on the Internet. I mean, it is so crazy how many people are putting out music right now. There is really good music being put out right now and there are amazing new artists but they are just so hard to find. If you are crazy enough to start a band or to start making music, I would warn you not to [laughs], but if you disregard that warning, then by all means practice a lot, write all of the time and don’t filter yourself.

Another cool aspect of your career is your artwork. Anything new happening on that front we should be on the lookout for?

I paint all the time, so I am basically trying to amass a body of work that I feel comfortable with in putting it all together and having a big gallery show or something along those lines. I will probably align that with doing some kind of book at the same time with a bunch of my artwork. So, yeah, possibly a book and a gallery show. I have been saying that for years but maybe it will happen!

The power of positive thinking!

[laughs] Absolutely!

Is there anything you would like to add before I let you go?

That’s basically it. I am all guns blazing behind two different bands right now!

Keep up the good work, Wes. All the best to you and we will see you on the road soon! We appreciate the opportunity to help spread the word.

Thanks for being interested! Take care!

Check out the official website for the band at blacklightburnsofficial.com, complete with a free download of the album track, “Splayed” from “The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall”. 

The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall can be purchased online at:

http://bit.ly/TheMoment_iTunes (iTunes)
http://bit.ly/TheMoment_Amzn (Amazon)
http://bit.ly/TheMoment_VNYL (Brookvale Records Vinyl)
http://bit.ly/TheMoment_Nwbry (Newbury Comics)

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Black Light Burns: Now Streaming “The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall”

Black Light Burns: Now Streaming “The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall”

Black Light Burns

Black Light Burns, the avant-garde alter ego of Limp Bizkit guitarist, Wes Borland, has released its sophomore album, The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall, today via Rocket Science/THC: Music. Fans can stream the record in its entirety this week on AOL.com at this location >

A music video by famed director, Agata Alexander, for the album’s first official single, “How To Look Naked,” is currently in production and will be available soon.

Last week the band announced a string of headlining tour-dates, “Black Light Burns U.S. Tour: Chapter One,” set to launch on September 13th in Lancaster, Calif. When asked about his anticipation of the run with supporting acts, Psychostick and The Witch Was Right, Borland commented, “We’re gonna get down, boogie woogie, do it the way we do it. Hands are encouraged to feel up, but not be thrown up. Do not say ‘ho’ if I say ‘hey.’ Nobody will literally have their head ripped off. The roof will remain where it is during the entire show. During the set, we encourage everyone to be the opposite of dressed. Let’s smile a lot and make it look like we’re having a good time just in case they’re watching…”

The touring schedule has been expanded since the dates were announced last week. A full list of confirmed shows can be seen below.

“The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall” track list:

1. How to Look Naked

2. We Light Up

3. I Want You To

4. The Girl in Black

5. The Colour Escapes

6. Tiger by the Tail

7. Your Head Will be Rotting on a Spike

8. Torch From The Sky

9. Because of You

10. Splayed

11. Scream Hallelujah

12. Bakelite

13. Burn the World

14. Grinning Like a Slit

15. The Moment You Realize You’re Going to Fall

 

The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall can be purchased online at:

http://bit.ly/TheMoment_iTunes (iTunes)
http://bit.ly/TheMoment_Amzn (Amazon)
http://bit.ly/TheMoment_VNYL (Brookvale Records Vinyl)
http://bit.ly/TheMoment_Nwbry (Newbury Comics) 

Black Light Burns released its debut, Cruel Melody, in 2007 featuring Danny Lohner (NIN), Josh Eustis (Puscifer) and Josh Freese (Guns N’ Roses), and a follow-up LP of covers and B-side material, 2008’s, Cover Your Heart, and an accompanying DVD entitled, The Anvil Pants Odyssey.

In 2009, Borland and Black Light Burns hit the road for an extended run with industrial powerhouse, Combichrist, and contributed the track, “I Want You To,” to the Underworld: Rise of the Lycans soundtrack. BLB took a temporary hiatus while Borland stayed busy with a world tour with the reformed Limp Bizkit. In 2012 BLB returned, to the delight of fans, with the track, “It Rapes All In Its Path,” on the Underworld: Awakening soundtrack, and the announcement of the impending release of a new LP.

Borland and co. recently launched a new website, blacklightburnsofficial.com, complete with a free download of the album track, “Splayed.”

Stay tuned to blacklightburnsofficial.com for more information on Black Light Burns and The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall.

 

“Black Light Burns U.S. Tour: Chapter One” dates…

9/13 – Lancaster, CA @ Industry Theater

9/14 – Fresno, CA @ Babylon

9/15 – Las Vegas, NV @ Bunkhouse

9/17 – Amarillo, TX @ Leftwoods

9/18 – Austin, TX @ Dirty Dog

9/19 – Little Rock, AR @ Juanita’s

9/20 – Fort Worth, TX @ Tomcats West

9/21 – Norman, OK @ Hidden Castle

9/22 – Kansas City, MO @ Aftershock

9/25 – San Antonio, TX @ Korova

9/26 – El Paso, TX @ House Of Rock

9/27 – Tempe, AZ @ Rocky Point Cantina

9/29 – Sacramento, CA @ Boardwalk

9/30 – W. Hollywood, CA @ Whisky A Go Go

 

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Wes Borland Speaks Out And Defends Limp Bizkit’s ‘Gold Cobra’

Wes Borland Speaks Out And Defends Limp Bizkit’s ‘Gold Cobra’

In a recent exchange between Limp Bizkit guitarist Wes Borland and the music blog Antiquiet, Wes defended Gold Cobra,front man Fred Durst and all the negative criticism the band and album have been receiving. “There is no way in hell our band would ever have been successful without Fred as the singer. Period. He is an astonishing front man and performer.” Later on in the exchange Wes dishes on his reasoning behind rejoining the band, “There’s a chemistry that the five of us have that just works. I also feel more creative in this environment as well because it challenges me to be a better artist.” To view the complete transcript visit Antiquiet.

Gold Cobra is available everywhere June 28th and can be pre-ordered on iTunes.

To stay up-to-date with all the latest news ‘LIKE’ Limp Bizkit on Facebook and check out their Official Site.

Read Icon Vs. Icon’s positive review of ‘Gold Cobra’ at this location! – CLICK HERE!

 

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Review: Limp Bizkit Strike Back With The Power of ‘Gold Cobra’

Review: Limp Bizkit Strike Back With The Power of ‘Gold Cobra’

Limp Bizkit burst onto the scene in the late 90s with a unique style and sound that quickly established them as one of the leaders of the emerging nu-metal scene. The band would experience a meteoric rise, develop a rabid fan base and tour the globe. As their mainstream popularity grew, it seemed that Limp Bizkit was an unstoppable force. Like so many bands before them, the band members would learn that with any amount of success comes growing pains. Limp Bizkit was no exception to this rule. Internal struggles in the band lead to the departure of guitarist Wes Borland, an unofficial hiatus and years of internet speculation about a possible reunion. During their time apart, each member would go on to experiment with new projects both in and out of the music industry. On February 11, 2009, the reunion rumors were confirmed as frontman Fred Durst and Wes Borland released a joint statement about the future of the band. It read: “We decided we were more disgusted and bored with the state of heavy popular music than we were with one another. Regardless of where our separate paths have taken us, we recognize there is a powerful and unique energy with this particular group of people we have not found anywhere else. This is why Limp Bizkit is back.” It was this moment that ushered in the ‘Gold Cobra’ era of Limp Bizkit.

My history with the band starts way back when they had just released their debut album, ‘Three Dollar Bill, Y’all$’. A friend had introduced to the album and I found myself blow away by it. The band’s overall sound and style were stark contrast to what was filling the airwaves at the time and provided a much needed break to that seemingly endless monotony. We went to as many LB shows as we could in our surrounding area as they always provided a ton of bang for your buck. Along the way I scored a signed Cassingle from Fred Durst (which is either still around here or was sold on the early days of eBay to finance our binge drinking/concert going experience) and we even served as an impromptu landing pad for Fred Durst as he dove from the balcony of Washington, DC’s legendary 930 Club. We found ourselves on the ground floor for the growing nu-metal movement which was pretty exciting at the time. As the month’s went on and the band’s popularity grew, we found ourselves just as captivated by their second release ‘Significant Other’. The band was clearly growing musically and charted a slew of hits with that album. We were in attendance as the band played in front of a worldwide audience at Woodstock ’99 and it seemed that the once obscure group with the strange name was now on the tongue of everyone in attendance. The band that people had given us shit about listening to was now bumping out of the speakers at every house party we rolled in on donning our Korn/Deftones/Limp Bizkit chique. We were on top of the world and thought we were pretty awesome (which is one of the many things we did in our misguided youth that I still stand behind — as we helped change the pop culture landscape in our own way, record to record, party to party, suburb to suburb!). It was cool to be part of that experience and I look back on that period with fond memories. It was shortly thereafter that the bottom started falling out on my dedication to the band. I am sure it was a combination of elements ranging from a broadening taste in metal, the overexposure of the band in the rock/pop media, the band’s internal struggles and two albums that just didn’t seem to capture the magic of the earlier work. Time marched on for us all.

I never strayed to far from the band. During those years away, we even were inspired enough to spawn our own music website to spread the word on the band’s that we loved. Our friends got married, had kids, relationships dissolved but I always kept on eye on the developments with Limp Bizkit along the way. It is safe to say that it was an interesting decade for all involved. So when I say the news that the band was going to reunite, I was very intrigued. In recent years, I had seen and spoke to Wes Borland about his side projects and the bad blood among the former band members. I had seen Fred Durst go from media icon to a much more low-key, focused and seemingly content artist in those years. Nu-metal was dead, just mentioned in every article and the sound of the scene had once again shifted. The question was “What would this all amount to?” I was quite pleased to find my answer.

‘Gold Cobra’ is a powerful blend of what made me a fan of the band in the first place. I suppose going into this album, my worst fear was that it would be more of the same but that is not the case for ‘Gold Cobra’. While it includes elements of the band’s signature sound and brings the excitement and energy of the first two albums, at no point does ‘Gold Cobra’ feel rehashed or like a serve as a reboot of a time long since past. The unique sound that Borland brings to the fold is once again present along with a renewed ferociousness in Durst’s voice and lyrics. While the frontman and guitarist may be the most high profile members of this outfit, you can’t overlook the contributions of bassist Sam Rivers, drummer John Otto and the scratching the legendary DJ Lethal. Throughout the album, each member of the band shines and they sound tighter than on any previous outing. Standout tracks on ‘Gold Cobra’ include the chugging, return to the scene anthem “Bring It Back,” the anger fueled, take no prisoners style of “Shark Attack” and “Douche Bag,” and the ethereal sounds of “Walking Away.”

They say every journey begins with a single step and when it comes to Limp Bizkit they have never been a band that is afraid to take leaps. The difference between the leap for ‘Gold Cobra’ and the last studio outing is that the band has landed sure-footedly with this effort and will hopefully keep this momentum going forward. The energy and musical artistry on the record will certainly remove any doubt that they are simply back for the paycheck or that they are simply phoning it in. No matter which era you might have joined the Limp Bizkit movement, there is certainly something for every fan on this album and it will deliver a few surprises along the way. If they proved anything to me with this release, it is that reunited and reenergized, the boys in Limp Bizkit once again take the world by storm and I for one am happy to have them back.

Put away any preconceived notions that you may have about the band and experience the power of ‘Gold Cobra’ for yourself when it hits the streets on June 28th, 2011.

SCORE: 4.5 out of 5

“Gold Cobra” will come in several configurations. The standard release will feature 13 new songs while the deluxe edition (available digitally only) will feature 16 new songs. Additionally, fans can purchase a physical CD that has 17 original songs exclusively at Best Buy, and that same release of 16 songs will be available digitally at Napster.com.

To stay up-to-date with all the latest news LIKE Limp Bizkit on Facebook and check out their Official Site!

“Gold Cobra” album configurations and track listings:

Standard Edition

01. Introbra
02. Bring It Back
03. Gold Cobra
04. Shark Attack
05. Get A Life
06. Shotgun
07. Douche Bag
08. Walking Away
09. Loser
10. Autotunage
11. 90.2.10
12. Why Try
13. Killer In You

Deluxe Edition

01. Introbra
02. Bring It Back
03. Gold Cobra
04. Shark Attack
05. Get A Life
06. Shotgun
07. Douche Bag
08. Walking Away
09. Loser
10. Autotunage
11. 90.2.10
12. Why Try
13. Killer In You
14. Back Porch
15. My Own Cobain
16. Angels

Best Buy Deluxe Edition

01. Introbra
02. Bring It Back
03. Gold Cobra
04. Shark Attack
05. Get A Life
06. Shotgun
07. Douche Bag
08. Walking Away
09. Loser
10. Autotunage
11. 90.2.10
12. Why Try
13. Killer In You
14. Back Porch
15. My Own Cobain
16. Angels
17. Middle Finger (feat Paul Wall)

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Limp Bizkit Release Lyric Video For “Gold Cobra” Featuring Stormtrooper Fred Durst

Limp Bizkit Release Lyric Video For “Gold Cobra” Featuring Stormtrooper Fred Durst

Limp Bizkit have just released a new lyric video for the single “Gold Cobra” which is featured on the upcoming album of the same name, available everywhere June 28th. The lyric video features Fred wearing a Storm Trooper helmet from Star Wars, while editing some footage on his computer.

The album, which is the band’s first with the original lineup in 10 years, will come in several configurations, a standard release featuring 13 new songs, and a digital only Deluxe Edition featuring 16 new songs. Additionally, the band will release an edition of GOLD COBRA containing 17 original songs which can be purchased physically, exclusively at Best Buy, and digitally, exclusively at Napster.com.

To stay up-to-date with all the latest news LIKE Limp Bizkit on Facebook and check out their Official Site!

STANDARD ALBUM TRACK LISTING:
1. Introbra
2. Bring It Back
3. Gold Cobra
4. Shark Attack
5. Get A Life
6. Shotgun
7. Douche Bag
8. Walking Away
9. Loser
10. Autotunage
11. 90.2.10
12. Why Try
13. Killer In You

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LISTEN UP! – Limp Bizkit Now Streaming New Single “Gold Cobra”

LISTEN UP! – Limp Bizkit Now Streaming New Single “Gold Cobra”

Limp Bizkit have just released a stream of their new single, “Gold Cobra” here. “Gold Cobra” is featured on the bands much anticipated album of the same name, which is available everywhere on June 28th. 2011.

The album, which is the band’s first with the original lineup in 10 years, will come in several configurations, a standard release featuring 13 new songs, and a digital only Deluxe Edition featuring 16 new songs. Additionally, the band will release an edition of GOLD COBRA containing 17 original songs which can be purchased physically, exclusively at Best Buy, and digitally, exclusively at Napster.com.

To stay up-to-date with all the latest news LIKE Limp Bizkit on Facebook and check out their Official Site!

STANDARD ALBUM TRACK LISTING:
1. Introbra
2. Bring It Back
3. Gold Cobra
4. Shark Attack
5. Get A Life
6. Shotgun
7. Douche Bag
8. Walking Away
9. Loser
10. Autotunage
11. 90.2.10
12. Why Try
13. Killer In You

Limp Bizkit – Gold Cobra by thearmpit

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