Tag Archive | "aliens"

Tom Delonge + History Channel Announce New Series — ‘Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation”

Tom Delonge + History Channel Announce New Series — ‘Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation”

In December of 2017, The New York Times published a stunning front-page exposé about the Pentagon’s mysterious UFO program, the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP). Featuring an interview with former military intelligence official and Special Agent In- Charge, Luis Elizondo, who confirmed the existence of the hidden government program, the controversial story was the focus of worldwide attention. Previously run by Elizondo, AATIP was created to research and investigate Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) including numerous videos of reported encounters, three of which were released to a shocked public in 2017. Elizondo resigned after expressing to the government that these UAPs could pose a major threat to our national security and not enough was being done to deal with them or address our potential vulnerabilities. Now, as a part of HISTORY’s groundbreaking new six-part, one-hour limited series “Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation™,” Elizondo is speaking out for the first time with Tom DeLonge, co-founder and President of To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science and Chris Mellon, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense and Intelligence, to expose a series of startling encounters and embark on fascinating new investigations that will urge the public to ask questions and look for answers. From A+E Originals, DeLonge serves as executive producer.

Says DeLonge, “With this show, the real conversation can finally begin. I’m thankful to HISTORY for giving the To The Stars Academy team of world-class scientists, engineers and intelligence experts the opportunity to tell the story in a comprehensive and compelling way.  I think everyone that watches the show will walk away with questions answered and a feeling of, “wow, I get it now.”’

“HISTORY is committed to creating informational, authentic programming that keeps our audience intrigued to learn more,” said Eli Lehrer, Executive Vice President and Head of Programming, HISTORY. “This is not a UFO hunting show, but a series that will hopefully provoke a cultural conversation about unexplained phenomena and allow our viewers to ultimately draw their own conclusions. Tom’s curiosity and passion for this subject matter, combined with his team, are the perfect partners to deliver this breakthrough series.”

DeLonge, Elizondo, Mellon and a trustworthy, connected team of investigators that includes retired Program Director for Advanced Systems at Lockheed Martin’s Skunkworks and the Aerospace Division Director for To The Stars Academy, Steve Justice, renowned CIA researcher and quantum physicist, and Vice President of Science and Technology at To The Stars Academy, Hal Puthoff and retired senior intelligence service member of the Central Intelligence Agency and Vice President of Operations at To The Stars Academy, Jim Semivan, will break boundaries and perceived government taboo by disclosing information about efforts being made to change government policy surrounding these phenomena, as well as produce tangible evidence to build the most indisputable case for the existence and threat of UFOs ever assembled. “Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation™” will reveal newly authenticated evidence and footage, interviews from eyewitnesses and former military personnel who have never spoken out before and extensive breakthroughs in understanding the technology behind these unknown phenomena in our skies.

“Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation™” is produced for HISTORY by A+E Originals. DeLonge is executive producer. Steve Ascher, Kristy Sabat and Anthony Lappé are executive producers for A+E Originals. Mike Stiller serves as executive producer for HISTORY.

About HISTORY®

HISTORY®, a division of A+E Networks, is the premier destination for historical storytelling. From best-in-class documentary events, to a signature slate of industry leading nonfiction series and premium fact-based scripted programming, HISTORY serves as the most trustworthy source of informational entertainment in media. HISTORY has been named the #1 U.S. TV network in buzz for seven consecutive years by YouGov BrandIndex, and a top favorite TV network by Beta Research Corporation. For a deeper dive, visit history.comor follow @history on Instagram, Twitterand Facebook. For additional press materials visit the A+E Networks Press Center at http://press.aenetworks.com.

About To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science®

To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science® is a public benefit corporation founded in 2017 as an incubator for progressive ideas integrating art, science engineering. Established by award-winning artist Tom DeLonge with former senior intelligence officer of the CIA Jim Semivan and world-renowned quantum physicist Hal Puthoff, To The Stars Academy’s mission is to explore, educate and engineer next-generation scientific phenomena that can have a transformative and positive impact on society.  The organization uses its special access to intelligence insiders to create original, fact-based content across all multiple media platforms and partners with industry to transition transformative technology into revolutionary commercial and military systems. The organization became well-known for its involvement in obtaining and revealing the first official USG military evidence that had been declassified and disclosed to the public to establish the scientifically proven existence of the advanced technology of UFO’s in 2017. In 2018 they launched the ADAM Research Project, aprogram focused on exotic materials for technology innovation, and announced a TV series development deal with TBS.

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Trailer and Poster Art Revealed For ‘Bob Lazar: Area 51 & Flying Saucers’ Documentary

Trailer and Poster Art Revealed For ‘Bob Lazar: Area 51 & Flying Saucers’ Documentary

Area 51, flying saucers from another world – and the program to create a fierce technology. Bob Lazar remains the singular most famous and controversial name in the world of UFOs.

The reason you know about Area 51 is because Lazar came forward and told you about it. His disclosures have turned his life upside-down and he has tried to stay out of the spotlight. For this reason, he has never let any filmmaker into the private world of his daily life – that is – until now.

Jeremy Kenyon Lockyer Corbell’s film, ‘Bob Lazar: Area 51 & Flying Saucers,’ explores Lazar’s claims through the lens of thirty years – providing rare and never before revealed footage – guaranteed to alter the landscape of the debate. The film, narrated by Mickey Rourke, features Bob Lazar, George Knapp, Jeremy Kenyon Lockyer Corbell, Joy White, Phyllis Tucker, Layne Keck, Mario Santa Cruz and Zack Slizewski .

Own it on Digital December 4th and Available On Demand December 18th.

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Tobe Hooper’s ‘Invaders from Mars’ To Hit Blu-ray In April Via Scream Factory

Tobe Hooper’s ‘Invaders from Mars’ To Hit Blu-ray In April Via Scream Factory

Tobe Hooper's 'Invaders From Mars'

Tobe Hooper’s ‘Invaders From Mars’

Famed horror director Tobe Hooper’s 1986 re-make of the classic thriller film Invaders from Mars is a space-age creature feature crawling with horrifying hordes of Martians hell-bent on stealing your soul – as well as your planet!

Making its Blu-ray debut on April 7th, 2015 from Scream Factory, Invaders from Mars comes loaded with bonus features, including an all-new audio commentary from director Tobe Hooper, the new retrospective The Martians Are Coming!-The Making of Invaders from Mars, which features interviews with director Tobe Hooper, actor Hunter Carson, special creature effects artists Alec Gillis and Gino Crognale, and composer Christopher Young; galleries for the original storyboards and original production illustrations, and more! As an additional bonus, fans who order their copy from ShoutFactory.com will have their order shipped two weeks early.

Little David Gardner’s starry-eyed dreams turn into an out-of-this-world nightmare when invaders from the red planet land in his backyard and unleash their hostilities on unsuspecting earthlings! Paralyzed with fear as the aliens take over the minds of his mother, father and even his classmates, David must somehow find a way to stop them- before they turn the whole human race into brain-dead zombies!

Showcasing special effects from John Dykstra (Star Wars) and the creations of Stan Winston (Aliens), and starring Karen Black (House Of 1,000 Corpses), Hunter Carson (Paris, Texas), Timothy Bottoms (Rollercoaster), Louise Fletcher (Flowers In The Attic), James Karen (The Return Of The Living Dead) and Bud Cort (Harold And Maude), this thrilling remake is a must-own for horror fans.

Invaders from Mars Bonus Features

  • New audio commentary with director Tobe Hooper
  • The Martians Are Coming! – The Making of “Invaders from Mars”, an all-new retrospective featuring interviews with director Tobe Hooper, actor Hunter Carson, special creature effects artists Alec Gillis and Gino Crognale, and composer Christopher Young
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • TV spot
  • Original Storyboards
  • Original Production Illustration Gallery with commentary from artist William Stout.
  • Still Gallery

Shout! Factory will continue to present the on-going SCREAM FACTORY™ home entertainment series in 2015 with specific release dates, extras and key art.  Meanwhile, fans are encouraged to visit Shout! Factory’s website (www.ShoutFactory.com)  follow them on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ScreamFactoryDVD) and Twitter (@Scream_Factory) or to view exclusive video content on YouTube(http://www.youtube.com/user/ScreamFactoryTV/Home).

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JK Simmons Discusses His Career, Role In ‘Dark Skies’ And Much More!

JK Simmons Discusses His Career, Role In ‘Dark Skies’ And Much More!

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As one of the most exciting character actors in the entertainment industry, JK Simmons roles have been nothing short of eclectic. From a the chilling white supremacist on HBO’s critically acclaimed series ‘Oz,’ to the iconic J. Jonah Jameson from the ‘Spider-Man’ comics to being the voice of the Yellow M&M Candy, there is no trail he is afraid to blaze. His latest project, ‘Dark Skies,’ is another great performance to add to his already impressive resume. The film stars Keri Russell (August Rush, “The Americans”) and Josh Hamilton (The Bourne Identity, J. Edgar) as a young couple with children living in the suburbs. As husband and wife, Daniel (Hamilton) and Lacy Barrett (Russell) witness an escalating series of disturbing events involving their family, their safe and peaceful home quickly unravels. When it becomes clear that the Barrett family is being targeted by an unimaginably terrifying and deadly force, Daniel and Lucy take matters in their own hands to solve the mystery of what is after their family. ‘Dark Skies’ co-stars Dakota Goyo (Rise of the Guardians), Kadan Rockett (The Fortune Theory) and J.K. Simmons (Spider-Man franchise, Juno) in an amazing performance as paranormal expert Edwin Pollard. Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently sat down with JK Simmons to discuss his origins as an much-loved actor, his latest role in ‘Dark Skies,’ his longevity as a character actor and much more!

JK Simmons

JK Simmons

You have become such a familiar face over the years, I was curious to learn what got you started on a career path in the entertainment industry?

I was actually studying music in college and thought I was going to be somewhere between Leonard Bernstein and Robert Merrill when I was studying conducting, composing and singing. Through a gradual series of transitions into musical theater, then musical theater and then five years on Broadway, it was a very gradual and circuitous route to being about to do J. Jonah Jameson in ‘Spider-Man” and Edwin Pollard in ‘Dark Skies’.

Looking back at the early years of your career, who were your biggest influences?

One of my first films was called “The Jackal,” which may or may not have been a great movie but I had the great joy and privilege of being more or less attached at the hip with Sindey Poitier for the whole movie. I played his second in command at the FBI. We shot that movie for six weeks all over the world and working with him is certainly at the top of that list.

To what do you attribute you longevity in the entertainment industry?

You know what, I think it stems from the fact that from the time I was twenty something, I have more or less been a fifty something character actor waiting to happen! I have been coming into my own for a while now! I have also had chances to work with a lot of great people, bring some really good writers to the stage and screen and I have learned along the way. I have gotten competent at what I do.

You latest project is a very cool film called ‘Dark Skies’. What can you tell us about your character?

Well, he is a guy who lives with way to may cats and knows way too much about alien invasions. I am sure everyone else in his building and his neighborhood thinks he is a complete whack job but it turns out he is the only ray of hope in this families life that is dealing with the horror they are dealing with.

'Dark Skies'

‘Dark Skies’

What was it about the character or the script that drew you to this role?

I just thought it was a really intelligent take on this genre and the fact that it was just as much a movie about a family struggling through hard times as it was a sort of horror/alien movie. I thought it did a really nice job of conveying that on paper and ended up doing it on-screen as well. It did a nice job at melding genres and being an interesting film whether you are a fan of that genre or not.

What elements did you bring to the character that might not have existing page initially?

The vast majority of the time, I feel like that isn’t my job. I feel like my job is serve the writer and bring the character to life, whether it is bringing J. Jonah Jameson to life off the pages of Marvel Comics or trying to bringing this guy off the pages of the script. Certainly, sometimes when you are doing an improv style comedy, you are obviously always bringing yourself and I am trying to think of a word besides creativity because I to me the writers are the creators. The actors are more if a conduit. I really view it as, and I feel this sounds like false modesty sometimes, but I honestly believe actors are there to cooperate with each other but more importantly to serve the writers, whether it is Shakespeare, The Coen Brothers or whoever. My job is more like a conduit like I said, a translator or a medium between two worlds rather than a creative role.

The writer and director of ‘Dark Skies’ is Scott Stewart. This was your first time working with him. What was that experience like for you and what did he bring to the table, in your opinion?

Yeah, I am a complete moron about show business in general and this genre is not something I have spent a lot of time with. When my wife and I do get out to see a movie, horror is not what she is looking for! [laughs] I just took the job based on what I saw on the page. The bonus is, when you are working with a writer/director, if it someone new, you never know if they can do both or is this guy just got the opportunity to direct because he is a good writer. That isn’t Scott’s case at all. It was a nice combination of both. Being able to communicate as a writer by putting the characters on the page doesn’t mean you are going to be able to communicate with actors, the cinematographer and everyone else and translate what you want onto the screen. In this case, to my good fortune, he was a terrific director to work with.

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You also had the opportunity to work with some other very talented actors for your scenes. What was the biggest challenge during that period of time from an acting standpoint?

Probably cat continuity, I would say! [laughs] There were lots of cats wandering around the set. That was a challenge along with the complete lack of oxygen in that tiny little apartment once we got all the lights in, the nineteen people on the crew, the microphones and everything else that was there. The actual playing of the scene with Kerri [Russell], Josh [Hamilton] and myself was great. There are great and that was the easy part. It was cats and oxygen that were the issues!

Are you a believer in other-worldly beings who may walk among us?

I wouldn’t say I am a believer but at the same time I am not going to say I am not. I am open-minded. Honestly, I saw something one night in New Mexico that I can’t explain. It is not something I specifically put a lot of thought into but I am open to the possibilities.

JK Simmons

JK Simmons

One of the cool things about this film, as you mentioned, is that it isn’t easy placed in one genre. The same thing could be said for your career. What do you find yourself looking for in material these days when you are reviewing scripts?

Honestly, I am always looking for something differently than what I have been doing recently. In terms of comedy, if it makes me laugh, I will do it! I don’t care if it is low-brow, stupid, high-brow, offensive of this or that. I recently did a little gag for Jimmy Kimmel which will probably be provocative to some people. They sent it to me, I read it, I laughed, so I said “Sign me up!” It is the same way with a drama or any genre. If I read it and find it compelling or interesting and I think I can do it, because there are things I read that I think “This is great but I am not going to be good in it. They need to get somebody else.” It is really a combination.

How do you feel you have evolved as an actor since your earlier years in the craft?

I have been from being an absolutely abysmal actor to being a competent actor. That has been the evolution! Fortunately, most of the abysmal years were doing theaters for handfuls of people as I was learning, figuring things out and benefiting from some good directors in my formative years. In the twenty years or so that people have actually seen me on camera, I think the evolution continues more subtly. I continue to refine what I do and I continue to have opportunities to work with really, really good directors and writers like Jason Reitman, Sam Raimi and The Coen Brothers. Now, I can add Scott Stewart to that list!

Your work continues to be very diverse. Is there a particular type of film or a specific type of role you have your sights set on at this point in your career?

I would like to do a really, really intelligent, juicy bad guy part in a big movie. Most of them are not all that well written and frankly, most of them are going to actors that have a higher profile than me. I would also like to do something along the lines of ‘Juno’ where there is a more cuddly, good guy part that is a bigger role. Come to think of it, I might be getting into something like that soon. I have a new show that will be on NBC in mid-season of February called ‘The Family Guide’. It is the challenge I am looking for because it is a half hour comedy but it is also a guy who is an excellent father who also happens to be blind, so you add a little physical challenge on top of everything else! I am really looking forward to that!

With all of your years of experience, what is the best piece of advice you can pass along to those looking to making their career in the entertainment industry?

Honestly, my first piece of advice would be don’t! [laughs] Do this for fun and find something else you think you can enjoy or tolerate to do for a living. If you are determined to go forward, my biggest piece of advice would be listen and collaborate. In many ways, that is the most difficult thing to learn as an actor — to be relaxed enough to actually listen and collaborate with other actors, writers and directors. Be a team player!

Thank you very much for your time today, sir! It has been a pleasure!

Thank you!

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DARK SKIES: Director Scott Stewart Discusses The Creation of His Latest Film

DARK SKIES: Director Scott Stewart Discusses The Creation of His Latest Film

scott-stewart-2013

Director Scott Stewart exploded onto the scene with his first two visually stunning films, ‘Legion’ and ‘Priest’. His latest project, which he has both written and directed, is his most ambitious work to date.’Dark Skies’ stars Keri Russell (August Rush, “The Americans”) and Josh Hamilton (The Bourne Identity, J. Edgar) as a young couple with children living in the suburbs. As husband and wife, Daniel (Hamilton) and Lacy Barrett (Russell) witness an escalating series of disturbing events involving their family, their safe and peaceful home quickly unravels. When it becomes clear that the Barrett family is being targeted by an unimaginably terrifying and deadly force, Daniel and Lucy take matters in their own hands to solve the mystery of what is after their family. DARK SKIES co-stars Dakota Goyo (Rise of the Guardians), Kadan Rockett (The Fortune Theory) and J.K. Simmons (Spider-Man franchise, Juno) as paranormal expert Edwin Pollard. Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently sat down with director Scott Stewart to discuss his influences, the origins of the film, it’s underlying themes and the challenges involved with bringing it to the big screen. 

How did you get started on your journey into the entertainment industry and what made you pursue filmmaking as a career?

'Dark Skies'

‘Dark Skies’

Like so many, growing up in the late ‘70s and ‘80s, I had all of the regular touchstones of films that I loved. I got that bug very, very early and wanted to make movies. I grew up in the shadow of the Lucas companies. At the same time, I really liked computers. My father built the first home computer in Marin County, back in the early ‘70s. I had both tracks going growing up. I continued to play with computers and video cameras growing up and I ended up going to NYU’s film school for production. All of those elements converged in a way that was fun. I took some writing courses but I focused on production and ended up working at Industrial Light and Magic for four years. I eventually went on to start my own company called Orphanage, which I have had for 10 years and we worked on many movies. We also started a commercial, feature and television production division in Los Angeles, which I ran. My film “Legion” was one of the films I had written for hire. I was hired to write it, or re-write it I should say, for another filmmaker but it eventually came back to me as a director. Everybody always said it seemed like it happened overnight but it took six years for overnight to happen! [laughs] Sony Screen Gems bought the movie and it was off to the races from there! I have been working non-stop ever since.

Who would you cite as your biggest influence or even a personal mentor who guided you along the way?

At different parts of my life, at different ages, I have had different filmmakers influence me. Early on, I was in awe of George Lucas, Steven Spielberg and then all of the Amblin directors. One of the nice things about growing up near Industrial Light and Magic was that every summer they would hold these daylong seminars called Brown Box Luncheon at the Civic Center where they would go into great detail about how they had done various movies they had done or had been working on over the last year or so. They would bring out some of the models they had made and all that great stuff. It was a pleasure for me. My parents were very supportive of me doing that and would pay for me to go and do that at 13 or 14 years old. It was cool to get to spend the day with them and a lot of them were people I would end up working with when I started there. A lot of those folks were influences. As an older teenager, going to school in New York at NYU, Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, Spike Lee, Francis Ford Coppola and The Coen Brothers were very palpable influences. As I started to become a professional screenwriter and come up in the world, it became more about writers and screenwriters I had a lot of excitement for. As I got older, I became a member of the Director’s Guild. They have these dinners once a year as a toast to the great directors of the past. Growing up as a kid who wanted to make movies, it is pretty much the coolest thing in the world to sit next to many of your idols. Fortunately, it is one of the great pleasures of the job that they become peers as you move forward and establish a body of work. It is interesting discussing film with those filmmakers and learning about the techniques they are using and things they are interested in. It is a pretty wonderful, collaborative thing.

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Your latest film is “Dark Skies.” Tell us a little about the inspirations for this film and what made you want to bring the material to life in film form?

I was interested in doing something smaller and more intimate after making bigger and bigger studio films with lots of visual effects. I had grown up in the suburbs, so I was interested in telling a story about some of the suburbs being a wonderful and terrible place at the same time! [laughs] I also am getting to the age where I have a family, kids and live in the suburbs of Los Angeles, although most of Los Angeles feels like a city and a suburb at the same time. I wanted to talk about those things — where we moved to the suburbs to have order in our lives. Yet right now, in the last 15 years, people have been dealing with an economic crisis, people are upside-down on their home mortgages and there are a lot of environmental and geo-political things happening around the globe. It kinda feels like you are being thrown around by these tidal forces you don’t have much control over. No one chose to have a banking crisis that would destroy home values. I wanted to get at that in the movie. My favorite scary movies are ones where the boogeyman is an embodiment of our day-to-day fears. In this story, “The Greys,” the boogeymen, are really a force of nature. I tried to treat them in the most realistic way I could imagine. I did a ton of research on people who have said they have experienced something or have had direct contact with these beings that no one can definitively point to and say actually exist. If we take the point of view that they actually do, then you start to ponder, “Well, if they were that sophisticated to come here, then they are a force of nature. They are almost God-like.” You can’t really reason, argue, deal with, stop or beat a force of nature! It is kinda like a banking crisis, global warming, a drunk driving incident, a teen overdose or any other thing that seems to be happening that is completely out of our control. All of these things can happen in our lives in the suburbs and make us feel like we are out of control. I was really interested in getting at that with a family drama — parents dealing with their children, parents feeling out of control, parents feeling that they can’t talk to their kids, kids not really understanding becoming 13 years old and having your first sexual experience and having it be a really exciting and terrifying thing. There is also the influence of someone who is a little older and not really sure what to believe about how things are in the world. All of those things were really interesting to me and I drew from my own life about things I could talk to other people about. I really wanted to get those things into a genre movie!

There was another thing that was happening that I thought was really interesting. As a writer, you are always trying to figure out what the worst thing you can do to your main characters is. In looking at stories that happen in the news, every few years there is always a story where someone is accused of doing something terrible to their children, whether it is Casey Anthony or JonBenet Ramsey. Yet, there isn’t enough evidence for them to be convicted but in the court of public opinion, everyone has convicted them. They, of course, say they are innocent. In the back of my writer brain, I say, “What if JonBenet Ramsey’s family claimed a ghost strangled her in the basement?” Everyone would immediately want to string them up! There is no way anyone would believe them! I thought, “What if they were telling the truth?” Or at least what they perceived to be the truth. Suddenly, then you have a really interesting idea for a scary movie that has all sorts of other interesting ramifications to it. It started a convergence of all of these different ideas. I wanted to tell the story of this family going through something and also wanted them to get totally isolated from their friends, neighbors and the world around them where they literally look like crazy people when they start boarding up their windows. By the end of the movie, they are under a tremendous cloud of suspicion.

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As a writer and director, you control a lot of the aspects of the filmmaking process. How have you evolved in those capacities over the years?

It is interesting. I did two movies, “Legion” and “Priest,” which were very stylized, technically complex and had a lot of visual effects. I started out in the process wanting to control every aspect. Of course, you don’t because the studio has the final say on all sorts of things related to your movie! [laughs] They have a say in how it looks, the edits, how it ends and all sorts of stuff. As things change you don’t feel like you are that much in control by the end but at least in the process you hope to! I would storyboard every frame and be very, very specific on what I wanted in the pre-visualization process. The more I get into it, particularly with a movie like “Dark Skies,” I became more interested in less. I was interested in planning it all out but then seeing what a 6-year-old could do and where he would take it. I wanted to provide him room to just be himself and for a 13-year-old to be himself. I also wanted to give that space to our two incredibly talented actors, Josh Hamilton and Keri Russell, who are also parents, to make the characters in the movie the greatest they could be. By giving them that space, the more realistic it would feel and the more the audience would care about and relate to it as people. I really wanted to get out of the way of the movie in many respects and not stylize it. In the end, I think by trying to see this much control is possible, I ended up getting much closer to the mark than I was really after. Some things in the film seem a little more alive, more vibrant, more relatable and real. I care about that a lot more. Between those first movies and “Dark Skies,” I had done the pilot episode of the television show, “Defiance.” I had to learn to shoot very, very fast because it was the first thing I had done for TV. That was like a baseball player practicing their swing before heading up to bat. It was the same shooting schedule as “Dark Skies” but considerably more complex with CG characters, green screen stages, stunts and tons of characters. “Dark Skies” was very intimate and took place mostly on location. All of that was definitely an evolution for me. I feel the more I work as a filmmaker, the more interested I become in trying to get at — something that feels more intimate and more actor and character driven, even if it is told on quite a grand scale.

'Dark Skies'

‘Dark Skies’

What is the best piece of advice you can pass along to aspiring screenwriters and filmmakers in the current climate?

As a writer, read a lot. Read your favorite writers. read things that aren’t good just as much as things that are. Read as much as you can. I think it was Stephen King who said in his book on writing, “If you don’t have time to read a lot, you don’t have time to write.” Read and write a lot! Just hammer away at things! You really have to commit to spending a certain number of hours with your ass in a chair or you just won’t ever bake any of the pies all the way through. For directors, people are so empowered now. In my earlier career, I have been involved in technology that was high quality filmmaking technology that was becoming less and less expensive. The barriers to entry and making great looking movies have continued to get lower as the quality has continued to get higher. I look at a movie, most recently, like “Upstream Color,” which is taking to the most extreme with a consumer grade camera, self distribution and all of these types of things. Yet, it is a beautiful, exquisitely crafted movie. I think you should just go out and shoot. Spend less time and money on film schools. Buy your gear or get it whatever way you can and shoot, shoot, shoot!

Great advice! Hopefully you will motivate a few individuals out there. Thank you very much for your time today! We look forward to talking with you soon!

Thank you, Jason!

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Michael Biehn’s ‘The Victim’ Finds International Distributor, To Debut At Sitges Film Festival

Michael Biehn’s ‘The Victim’ Finds International Distributor, To Debut At Sitges Film Festival

Some exciting news in regard to Michael Biehn’s grindhouse thriller “The Victim”. Paris-based WTF has acquired all international sales rights to THE VICTIM, the grindhouse thriller which marks the feature directorial debut of renowned Fanboy star Michael Biehn.

Biehn also wrote, produced and stars alongside Jennifer Blanc-Biehn, Danielle Harris, Ryan Honey and Denny Kirkwood. The film was produced by Blanc/Bien Productions (Jennifer Blanc-Biehn, Lorna Paul and Travis Romero) and The Mud Show (Ryan Honey, Brock Morse and Morgan Johnson). THE VICTIM is the inaugural acquisition of WTF which was recently launched by former TF1 International senior sales executive Dimitri Stephanides. Kevin Iwashina and Christine D’Souza of Preferred Content represented the filmmakers and negotiated the deal with Stephanides. THE VICTIM will make its international premiere at the Sitges Film Festival in Spain on 7 and 8 October in a double feature with Hobo With A Shotgun.”

Swing by the official site of the film at www.grindhousethevictim.com for loads a look at the cast/crew and loads of stills from the film!

Synopsis: Good time girls ANNIE (Jennifer Blanc) and MARY (Danielle Harris) went into the wilderness looking for a good time. But when Annie witnesses a violent act at the hands of two Sheriff’s Deputies, she is forced on the run and stumbles across KYLE (Michael Biehn), a recluse living in the woods.  Two worlds collide in this psychological thriller that will make you question your trust in mankind. WHO IS THE VICTIM?

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New Cast Interviews For Michael Biehn’s ‘The Victim’ Unveiled!

New Cast Interviews For Michael Biehn’s ‘The Victim’ Unveiled!

One of our most anticipated films of 2011 is, without a doubt, Michael Biehn‘s ‘The Victim’. The flick stars Michael Biehn (Terminator, Aliens, Grindhouse), Ryan Honey (“ER,” Hallowed Ground), Jennifer Blanc (“Dark Angel,” “Party of Five”), Denny Kirkwood (Never Been Kissed, Groove), and our favorite “Horrorgal” Danielle Harris (Rob Zombie’s Halloween, Hatchet II).

Check out some fresh new interviews from the cast and swing by the official site of the film at www.grindhousethevictim.com for loads a look at the cast/crew and loads of stills from the film!

Synopsis: Good time girls ANNIE (Jennifer Blanc) and MARY (Danielle Harris) went into the wilderness looking for a good time. But when Annie witnesses a violent act at the hands of two Sheriff’s Deputies, she is forced on the run and stumbles across KYLE (Michael Biehn), a recluse living in the woods.  Two worlds collide in this psychological thriller that will make you question your trust in mankind. WHO IS THE VICTIM?

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Megan Ward Sheds Light On The Mysteries of ‘Dark Skies’

Megan Ward Sheds Light On The Mysteries of ‘Dark Skies’

Megan Ward began working in the entertainment industry in the early ‘90s, getting her first taste of the business by starring in micro-budget science fiction outings for Full Moon Productions. It was there, under the watchful eye of director/genre favorite Charles Band, Ward starred in such cult classics as ‘Crash and Burn’ (1990), ‘Trancers II’ (1991), ‘Trancers III’ (1992) and ‘Arcade’ (1993) and began to hone her craft. As her star began to rise, she garnered larger parts, eventually leading to ‘Dark Skies’. As she will explain, every once in a blue moon a script comes along that is so innovative and intriguing, you have to be a part of it! Such is the case with ‘Dark Skies’.

At its core, the show is a magnificent period piece which centers around an idealistic Congressional aide, John Loengard and his fiance Kimberly Sayers. Their world is turned upside down when Loengard discovers evidence of aliens living among us and a massive government conspiracy to keep one of history’s biggest secrets under wraps. The show, which infused the iconic moments of one of America’s most captivating decades with the possibility of an alternative explanation to what we have all been told, quickly ignited a cult following dedicated to the creatively layered show. Fifteen years after its network television debut, the entire series will finally be unleashed for the first time on DVD to capture the imagination of a new generation. ‘Dark Skies: The Declassified Complete Series’ is set to be unleashed on January 18, 2011 via Shout! Factory, ironically marking the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s inauguration (who is a key player in many of the show’s events). We are often reminded by ‘Dark Skies’ that “history as we know it is a lie.” Now the truth can be told!

Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with Megan Ward to shed some light on the mysteries of ‘Dark Skies’. In the interview they discuss her roots in entertainment, her experiences as a young actress on the set of ‘Dark Skies,’ her work in the realm of sci-fi, and what the future may hold for one of Hollywood’s most multi-faceted actresses.

Where did you grow up and how did you get started in your career in the entertainment industry?

I was born in a town outside of Los Angeles but my parents moved to Hawaii when I was 5 years old. I grew up in Hawaii, believe it or not. My parents had been actors and that is how they met, but my Dad had a real job to pay the bills and basically that is why they moved to Hawaii. They started an acting school once we moved there. All of my youth was spent growing up in community theater, basically ‘Waiting For Guffman’, that is my childhood. [laughs] When I was 9, my mother was working in a modeling agency. She started sending me and my brothers and sister out for commercial and print work. So from the age of 9, I was working very steadily with Japanese and local commercials. It was sorta handed down, I was naturally put in to the business in a way because my parents were involved. I went back and forth to Japan during my high school years and moved out here, basically the day after I graduated and hit the pavement running and tried to get working in the big pond!

It certainly seems that it is working out for you so far!

Yeah! It’s going OK! Yeah! [laughs]

Aside from your parents, I am curious to know who has been most influential to you as an actress?

Ya know, I was almost kinda old fashioned I guess. As a young person, I watched a lot of the old classics like ‘The Sound of Music,’ ‘The Philadelphia Story’ and ‘The Wizard of Oz’ — all these old but very well known movies that would play each year on TV. I had my hairbrush in my hand singing the songs to all the musicals and I really wanted to be an old fashioned movie star! [laughs] Unfortunately, those times have kinda changed and I didn’t quite get that when I got here! But it was very much the Audrey Hepburn, Katharine Hepburn, Grace Kelly type of actresses that I admired.

It must be good to finally see ‘Dark Skies’ out on DVD after all these years. How did you get involved with the project initially?

It was a very normal, straight up Hollywood story where they were looking for an actress to play a role in the pilot and I got an audition. I loved the script! It was the most unusual thing that I had ever read because it started off with this page, a sort of cover letter, which kinda led you to believe that it was real, that it was true. I remember thinking that it had to be a great script if they were clever enough to have written that cover page. I went in and auditioned and tested. I did all of the things that I had to do to win the role. It was a very traditional process. I got the part by working hard for it!

Was there something that stood out about the character that initially attracted you to the role?

Very much! I have always really liked sci-fi and stories that are told visually as well as dramatically in a story arc. This project did both! You had this very sensational alien conspiracy that needed to be shown, shot and filmed in a very epic, larger than life way, bigger than your standard television show. At the heart of it all were these two characters that were very human. That was kinda the point, that they are not aliens and are very human and they are going through a very dramatic change by learning that there are other creatures who are infiltrating our world and our government is keeping that information from everyone. The core emotional arc of that character, “Kim,” along with the fact that she gets abducted to me was incredibly fascinating. She was this idealistic Kennedy youth with all the promise of the future ahead of her, yet both her and John are both burdened with this very important information and tragic circumstances. They now have to dedicate their lives to saving humanity. It was a VERY epic story and all very human and relatable. It was a very rich character to play. You don’t always find that!

What was the biggest challenge in bringing this character to life?

I think there were two things. One was that physically, it was almost an impossible show to make. We shot 80 hour weeks in crazy locations. The show took place in the ‘60s, in different cities and incorporated historical events. We had so much physical challenge just to pull that off. The other challenge was that my character was this emotional throughline of the story. She represented how America was changing during this time. That was very difficult to play a character that communicated with an alien without any words and to somehow convey a story that meant to continue the fight and strengthened the character in her journey. That was tricky for me. I think that, ultimately, the story may have changed partly because they needed more dynamic action or guns or things like that. So, it was tricky to do but I feel very privileged to have had the opportunity to tell a story that way.

When you look back on that time in your career, is there something that stands out as a great moment from just being involved with the series and its talent?

You know, there were several! It has been a number of years, so it is hard to remember them all. I was able to go back and watch a lot of the shows before I did my audio commentary for the DVD release. It was just shocking how many things that we did that I had completely forgotten! There was one moment that I look back on and really love! The pilot was exceptional. It was a lot like making a feature film. During the series, there is a time where the characters are involved with the Beatles appearance on the Ed Sullivan show. We shot the scenes at an old theater downtown. We have a scene where we are standing on the sidelines and the Beatles are doing their songs for the Ed Sullivan show and the episode involved the New York blackout. That was such an amazing moment because it felt so real! I had several moments like that but that was the most memorable because it was a fun and happy moment as opposed to laying flowers at the Eternal Flame for JFK. It wasn’t a somber moment. It captured a huge moment in history that had I been alive for, I would have loved to take part in!

On ‘Dark Skies’, you got to work with the late JT Walsh. From what I have heard he was quite a character. What can you tell us about working with him?

Ya know, both Eric Close and I were very young when we did the show. I think that our roles were the biggest responsibility that we had had at that point in our careers. JT was so wise and experienced. He had such strong opinions, which could make for a very difficult situation as well, but he was so certain of himself and the material. I always looked up to him and appreciated being in scenes with him because he was so clear. At that point I was still trying to figure out what a line meant or what a scene was about. He just always knew. The confidence that he had really meant a lot to me because I was able to look up to him, even if I didn’t have that much interaction with him. I felt very privileged to work with him. He was great even though he was difficult and tough but he was so talented and sure of himself. He had lived such a great life and I was very fortunate to work with him and to have learned from him.

You cut your teeth in the industry with some roles with Full Moon Productions such as ‘Crash and Burn’ and ‘Trancers II’.

That’s right!

As a fan of sci-fi and your early work, I was wondering what you learned from your time on these lower budget productions?

There is no time for any shenanigans when you are working on a movie whose budget is $800,000 or a million and a half dollars which might have been the biggest one. That’s because there are very few frills in the way of extras or privileges. Having worked on some bigger sets as well, it is very shocking to me how much money is spent on craft services, lunch or snacks! Or how much time is spent waiting for an actor to come out of their dressing room. There is no time for any of that on a smaller film! I feel really lucky that I started that way because it was always about the work! You only got a few takes and Charlie Band was just so wonderful to me. He was very inclusive in the process, so I was able to learn about camera set ups, lighting and all of the technical aspects that went into making those movies. I felt involved! I felt that everything I did mattered to the production, so I was invested to do the best that I could do. I feel that is who I am anyway, but it is carried through all of these years. “Don’t mess around, do it right the first time. If you don’t do it right the first time, do it right the second time! You need to make it good, collaborate but not waste time on yourself or on your ego!” There was no time for any of that! All of those little movies have so much integrity for me because they had to work so hard and do it right, because you don’t get extra chances. I think that every actor should have to work that way or do a project like that, just so they know how good they have it when they work on a larger production.

Obviously, you have dabbled in sci-fi, drama and have a recurring role on a soap opera. That is a pretty good mix of material. Is there a type of role that you haven’t played yet that you might like to tackle in the future?

It has always been my dream to be on stage and to do Broadway. That just seems so elusive to me right now because I have two young children and New York is very far away! But to me, every job is new, whether it is a commercial, television series or a feature film. With each role, there is something new to discover. It always feels fresh, even if I am playing a widow… again! [laughs] Physically, I would love to be on the stage and have time to rehearse. I feel like that is what I will do when my kids go to college! I don’t know, maybe that is going to be my final chapter! [laughs] I really do look forward to doing something like that. I have been on stage as a young actor a lot but not on a large venue with lots and lots of people! That would be the dream for me but I feel that I have a few decades left to do it!

What other projects do you have coming up that we should be on the lookout for and where is the best place for people to find out what’s happening with you?

I have an episode of CSI: New York coming up soon. I believe it will be airing in February of 2011.  Look out for that! I do have a website at www.meganward.tv but that is sometimes updated! [laughs] People can follow me on Twitter at www.twitter.com/themeganward.

What advice would you give to someone just starting out on a career in the entertainment industry?

Do it for yourself! Don’t look at results because at times they are incredibly arbitrary, do it for yourself!

Great advice! We thank you for your time and we wish you all the best!

Thank you!

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Bryce Zabel Talks ‘Dark Skies’ and ‘A.D.: After Disclosure’

Bryce Zabel Talks ‘Dark Skies’ and ‘A.D.: After Disclosure’

Bryce Zabel is one of the most interesting personalities in the entertainment industry. As a writer/producer, he is responsible for some of the most entertaining science fiction projects to be brought to the screen. One of his crowning achievements is ‘Dark Skies,’ a show that remains as innovative as it is intriguing. At its core, the show is a magnificent period piece which centers around an idealistic Congressional aide, John Loengard and his fiance Kimberly Sayers. Their world is turned upside down when Loengard discovers evidence of aliens living among us and a massive government conspiracy to keep one of history’s biggest secrets under wraps. The show, which infused the iconic moments of one of America’s most captivating decades with the possibility of an alternative explanation to what we have all been told, quickly ignited a cult following dedicated to the creatively layered show. Fifteen years after its network television debut, the entire series will finally be unleashed for the first time on DVD to capture the imagination of a new generation. ‘Dark Skies: The Declassified Complete Series’ was unleashed on January 18, 2011 via Shout! Factory, ironically marking the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s inauguration (who is a key player in many of the show’s events). We are often reminded by ‘Dark Skies’ that “history as we know it is a lie.” Now the truth can be told! Jason Price of Icon Vs. Icon recently caught up with Bryce Zabel to shed some light on the mysteries of ‘Dark Skies’. In the interview they discuss his roots in entertainment, the challenges involved with making a show like ‘Dark Skies’, his work in the realm of UFO/Extraterrestrial Truth, his recently released book ‘A.D.: After Disclosure’ and much more!

We are big fans of the Dark Skies series, going back to when it started, so it was really cool to see the DVDs coming out.

Nobody was more relieved than me to see it finally happen, but they did a beautiful job over at Shout! Factory.

I want to give our readers a little background on you. How did you originally get involved with the entertainment industry?

Well, I started out, you probably know, in journalism.  I was a CNN correspondent, then I was a investigative news reporter.  And I got into entertainment because my wife at the time, she wasn’t my wife at the time, but my girlfriend at the time said, “Maybe you should write a screenplay,” and I didn’t even know what a screenplay looked like. So I got a copy of one and said, “Okay, maybe I’ll write one.” And I wrote one, and it ended up being, auctioned and turned into 108 episode series in Canada.  And I guess I never looked back.  I just kept writing.  And I kept thinking to myself, “I’ll stop writing screenplays when they stop paying me to do it.” And luckily, they’ve continued to pay me, so I keep doing it.

Another interesting thing you’re involved with the world of UFO/Extraterrestrial Truth. How did that come about exactly?

Well, let’s face it.  The main thing that’s really red hot for me right now is that Richard Dolan, who’s the leading UFO historian in the whole world, and I, have co-written a book called A.D.: After Disclosure.  And it’s a nonfiction book making the case that what the world – instead of trying to prove that UFOs are real, it’s one that basically says they are real.  Here’s how it’s going to change the world when the powers that be acknowledge it.  So that’s kind of exciting.

And how did I get to that place?  Well, I got into UFOs I guess simply because I thought as screenwriter, they would make a good story.  So the first – I was spec-ing a script called Progenitor, which became Official Denial, which became the Syfy Channel’s first original film. I started to do my research for it.  I mean, I’m – as a former – as a reformed journalist, I still have research habits, and one of the things for me is it’s very important that your scripts have a real sense of authenticity.  So I started doing, basic research in order to write this thing.  And the more I read, the more I went, there’s something here.  The thing about UFOs, it’s a big signal to noise thing.  There’s a lot of noise, a lot of crazy stuff around it, but beneath it all, there’s a very true and real signal.

And so, look, I’m a journalist.  I’m attracted to important, powerful stories.  The most powerful and important story that’s never been told, if you will, is UFOs.  I mean, it’s real.  There is a reality to UFOs.  That’s all there is to it.  I don’t know what exactly they are, and I can speculate like everybody else, but the one thing they aren’t all is the planet Venus seen by people in the middle of the night.

So, I’ve continued to read over the years, and the more I’ve read, the more it becomes simply impossible to ignore the reality here.  So I guess I just feel like in my lifetime I would like us to at least begin the public dialogue that is necessary to start to deal with this for real.  So I guess that’s why I’m kind of an activist in that regard.

Obviously, that’s kind of what laid the groundwork for Dark Skies originally.

Yes.

You took a very unique approach when you presented the initial idea to the network. What can you tell us about the pitch?

What Brent Friedman and I decided to do is we created an ultra-classified briefing book that was our pitch, in which inside the briefing book there was a memo that basically said, “This truth has to be revealed to the public, but it’s such a radical truth that if we try to do it by covert means, it’ll blow too many people’s minds, basically.  You have to present the truth with such – ” That’s what the context of the briefing book was.  And so therefore, you need to do a television series.  It’s kind of crazy.

So what we did is we created this very authentic black briefing book that basically had a gold foil seal on it, and we – and it said on the front of the briefing book that if you broke the seal, you accepted the penalties of treason if you were to speak about this.  So I mean, it’s pretty intimidating stuff.  Then we wrapped it in brown wrapping paper and put twine around it and stamped top secret on it, and we left those with these network executives, because we were trying to make it an interactive experience.

So if you imagine, we went and pitched three networks in one day, and left one of these notebooks with each network.  And just imagine, after we left, there’s a network executive who’s got a brown-wrapped notebook with twine on it stamped top secret.  So he has to open the twine, then he has to open the brown wrapping paper.  Now he looks at this notebook that has a gold foil seal, and it says he’s accepted the penalty of treason if he blabs about it.  He opens it up, and it tells him that he has to do a TV series to get the truth out about UFOs.

That’s great!

I think that’s why it’s somewhat legendary, because it was pretty ballsy and it worked, because that one day that we visited three networks, two of them made offers on the series, on the same day.

The script for the series is very interwoven and very complex.  How difficult was it to map out a project like this when you’re starting out?

Well, it’s enormously – here’s the thing.  It’s enormously complex, but the job is to not let people see the complexity, and not to see that people – not for people to have to see all the wires and the behind the scenes things.  And the – in order to map the series out, we took a very unusual way to go about it.  I’m the son of a history teacher, so I know a lot of history, and I also collect Time and Newsweek magazines, and – which I know is kind of a weird obsession.

But what we did is we created a timeline with three columns in it.  Column 1 was – and I have a collection of UFO books and all that.  So column 1 was UFO events, where we would take dates of any UFO event and stick them into the timeline.  Column 2 was where we took dates from history books and from my Time and Newsweek collection from the 1960s and plugged them into that column.  And column 3 is where we wrote interpretations, when column 1 and column 2 lined up with something interesting, column 3 is where we did our Dark Skies spin.

So for example, I don’t know if you’ve seen the whole series, but there’s one episode called “To Pray in Darkness,” where the New York power blackout of 1965 occurred within the same 24 hour period as columnist Dorothy Kilgallen’s death and a UFO sighting over New Hampshire, where the power station failed.  And we just – we said, that’s just too good.  If that’s not an episode of Dark Skies, we don’t know what is.

So that’s how we found a lot of stories.  So – and that’s how you put the layers in it.  And the other thing we did that I don’t think anyone’s really done, we’re kind of ‘Mad Men’ with aliens, if you will.  What we tried to do is say, look, there’s official history, the history that we can get from those Time and Newsweek magazines, and the history we can get from the history books, but then there’s – if UFOs are real, then there’s also UFO history.  There’s Betty and Barney Hill in 1961.  There’s Lonnie Zamora in Socorro, New Mexico, in 1964.

There are personalities like J. Allen Hynek and Carl Sagan and people like that.  So we started trying to weave that storyline in with the historical storyline, in with our worldview about Majestic 12 and Loengard and Bach and all that, and all this kind of – it could have been a big mess, but instead, the gods smiled on us and it hung together.

What was the biggest challenge in putting that series together, either from a creative standpoint or just a technical standpoint of getting it to the network and all that?

Well, there’s two – let’s divide that into two parts.  Part 1 as a big challenge is simply you’re shooting a period show, and that’s expensive and difficult to get right.  And we took our responsibility of being a sixties period show with as much integrity as obviously the producers of Mad Men do today.  We wanted to – we wanted people who had lived through the sixties to look at our series and say, “That’s how it was.” Other than the UFO part, we wanted them to say, “That’s the clothes I wore.  Those are the glasses I wore.  That’s the car I drove.” That kind of thing.  So we wanted to get all that stuff right, just like Mad Men does.  So that was a big challenge.

The second big challenge is when you’re doing something as wacky as the unification theory of conspiracies that ties in JFK being killed because of the desire to disclose UFO reality, and that’s your pilot episode, and you’re trying to – and an American network is giving you like $44 million to make these episodes, then you have a ongoing daily challenge to protect your vision, and – because there’s always somebody who’s going to say, “You can’t use a real name.  You can’t say this.  This is too crazy.  This will offend so and so.  This isn’t right.”

Any network television series, and this I think is true for every series, has its own share of problems that simply go with different creative types having different visions, whether it’s the studio or the network or the creators.  Any series has that.  So we had that.  But on top of that we had the fact that we were doing a very disquieting thing, and on top of that, we were saying that it was all caused by a desire to tell the truth under the cover of fiction.

So we literally, just one moment in time that’ll show you how bizarre this got, we were shooting I think the first or second episode, and the line producer called me in and said, “We just received a question from the network.  They would like a memo from you by Friday explaining what’s real.” How often do you get that?

So Brent and I had to stop what we were doing in terms of telling the story and our product duties and compose a network memo that explained what parts of the series were real and what weren’t to lawyers. So you can see that it is really Alice in Wonderland in a lot of respects.

Now looking back, I mean, it’s been obviously many years since the series.  What was the process like with Shout! Factory and putting this together?


Oh, absolutely.  Well, first, it – let’s just – let’s put this in perspective.  This DVD should have been out a lot earlier.  I’ve been advocating it since 1997.  Okay?  But people always said the music rights would cost too much money.  We went through three different DVD companies, two before Shout! Factory and Shout! Factory, where we approached them and got them to say that the material – they loved the material.  They wanted to put it out.  They said it was great.  And then they did a budget on what it would cost to license the music and said, “We can’t afford to put it out.”

And so even Shout! Factory turned us down with the cost.  And so at that point, I started investigating with my music supervisor the possibility that we would bite the bullet, take all the music out other than the composer stuff, which we had rights to, all the original songs that gave it such a beautiful, sense of honesty, and instead put in sound-alike songs that we had rights to, were not expensive.

And just as we were pushing that forward, and that would have been a mess of its own, just as we were pushing that forward, Sony calls and says, “We’re not exactly sure why, but the same lawyers who for 13 years have been telling us that we don’t have the music rights and have to re-clear them, those same lawyers now have read the contract over and say we do have the rights.”

That’s what happened.  So then we went back to Shout! Factory and said, “Actually, we have the music rights.  You don’t have to re-clear them.” And they said, “Well, that’s different.  Now we can afford to put it out.” And the only thing that I insisted when they called me was I have a vast amount of – I’d saved from the beginning all the extras and the goodies that you find on that tape.  I mean, I don’t think they would have found them from anybody else, the promos, the sales reels, all that stuff.  I gave them everything, but I just said, “The thing I want to make sure is I want this to be the best DVD presentation that it possibly can be, so I want to be involved all the way in it.”

And they were thrilled, I think, to have that.  So we turned it into a real collaboration in terms of just trying to make this something that really, really stands out.  I think they did a brilliant job, and I think they think that they couldn’t have done the brilliant job they did if I hadn’t steered them in the right directions.  And so I’m very proud of it.  I think they’re proud of it.

Do you think at any point we’re going to be able to finish that story that you started so many years ago with Dark Skies?

I pray that we could.  Wouldn’t that be the comeback story of all time in television?

It sure would.

Well, there’s no reason why not. I mean, there’s no reason why not.  It was cut off prematurely.  We could easily rejoin the battle.  We could recast.  We could find a new way to dip our toe in the water.  But part of the reason I’ve worked so hard to get the DVD set out is my dream has always been to do exactly what you just suggested.  But in order to do that, we need to demonstrate that there is fan support to see that it happens, and that’s why I look at the success of the DVD that is coming out on January 18th.  If it becomes a raging success in the sci-fi community, which it has the possibility of doing, then we could come back, and that would be a beautiful thing.  I think Brent and I would be thrilled to finish the story.

Remember that timeline went from 65 million BC to 2030. So we have lots more story.  We could jump into the time stream almost anywhere.  And there’s so many new things.  I mean, think about it.  What interpretation would Dark Skies bring to 9/11?  What about Watergate? There’s so much good stuff!

What do you make of the recent rumblings about Wikileaks and possible alien activity being revealed, which kind of ties into your book a little bit?

Well, I think Wikileaks probably has some documents that probably show something that we’ve known for years, which is people in government take UFOs seriously.  Do they have a smoking gun document?  I’m not sure.  I think if they did, I think the cover-up has been so extreme that even the Wikileaks people would doubt the authenticity of the document.  So I don’t really – I don’t look for Wikileaks by itself to bring about disclosure, but Dolan and I in our book, A.D.: After Disclosure, do think that it’s a symphony of events that will have to lead one to another into an avalanche of disclosure.

So it won’t be one single event, but Wikileaks, for example, could be one of those events, coinciding with a mass sighting, coinciding with say a deathbed confession from somebody like a Colin Powell or somebody like that, or a George Bush Senior.  Some collection of events will break this thing open someday, and probably sooner than later.

Awesome.  Now in the – in the world of entertainment, what other projects are on the horizon for you that we should be on the lookout for?

Well, one thing that we’re doing with A.D.: After Disclosure, I’m – my company, Stellar Productions, is partnered with Brent’s company, Brent Friedman’s company, and Jeff Sagansky’s company, Electric Farm Entertainment.  So it’s really bringing the Dark Skies boys back together.  Sagansky was our Sony executive. And we are developing the television series of A.D.: After Disclosure.  So we’re working on that right now.

Also, I’ve just closed a deal to write the screenplay to Majic Men, M-A-J-I-C, Majic Men, which is going to tell the story of breaking the Roswell story from the point of view of two of the researchers whose life rights I’ve optioned, Stan Friedman and Donald Schmitt, and their books, Top Secret Majic and Witness to Roswell.  So we’re going to try to tell that story as sort of – it’s the story of two down to earth guys chasing a story that’s out of this world, if you will. I have some other non-UFO related things going on as well, but those are the sci-fi kind of things.

I read that article that you had written about television and “The Blur” called “The End of Television As We Know It.” I thought was very well-written.  How do you see technology impacting sci-fi as a genre in the future?

Well, that’s a really good question. I think the one thing that’s right about that article that you’re quoting is telling ourselves stories is something we’ve done since we did it around the fire, eons ago, and still will continue to do it, and only the technology will change.  But for example, the technology is going to allow more people to see Dark Skies now, and to talk about it, and to network about it, which could cause it to become a television series again.

There is an impact of that stuff.  Or we could decide, Brent’s company, Electric Farm, by the way, has pioneered a number of web series.  And so the – I guess the way sci-fi is going to be impacted is that there are different venues to tell your story now, and there’s – and the – sort of the flattening of the technology means that we all have access to it now.  So people can tell stories who aren’t professional storytellers anymore. So some of it’s good, but some of it means that we’ll be overwhelmed by some mediocre product, too.

That’s why networks still I think are going to exist into the future, because you still want your really big series that can really compel your attention like ‘Lost,’ Battlestar Galactica’ and ‘Dark Skies’.

If anybody wants to learn more about you, what’s the best place to catch up with you in whatever  you’ve got going on at the time?

Interviewee: Well, I have a website with my name.  It’s www.BryceZabel.com.  But also, we have a very vibrant website for the A.D. book if they want to know about UFOs, and Dark Skies, I put a lot of stuff about Dark Skies on the A.D. site, and so it’s called Afterdisclosure.com. I would say people who are interested in Dark Skies or science fiction or UFOs, Afterdisclosure.com is a good place to go.

Awesome. Well, I’ve watched a couple of video interviews with you over the past few days, and obviously I’m just scratching the surface, but I definitely want to turn some people on to the series and what you’ve been up to, because it’s very fascinating.

You’re really kind.  I appreciate it. It’s been a pleasure!


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Poster Art and NSFW Trailer For Michael Biehn’s ‘The Victim’

Poster Art and NSFW Trailer For Michael Biehn’s ‘The Victim’

One of our most anticipated films of 2011 is, without a doubt, Michael Biehn‘s ‘The Victim’. The flick stars Michael Biehn (Terminator, Aliens, Grindhouse), Ryan Honey (“ER,” Hallowed Ground), Jennifer Blanc (“Dark Angel,” “Party of Five”), Denny Kirkwood (Never Been Kissed, Groove), and our favorite “Horrorgal” Danielle Harris (Rob Zombie’s Halloween, Hatchet II).

Check out the NSFW trailer below and swing by the official site of the film at www.grindhousethevictim.com for loads a look at the cast/crew and loads of stills from the film! If you are into scantily clad bad girls… this is the place for you!

Synopsis: Good time girls ANNIE (Jennifer Blanc) and MARY (Danielle Harris) went into the wilderness looking for a good time. But when Annie witnesses a violent act at the hands of two Sheriff’s Deputies, she is forced on the run and stumbles across KYLE (Michael Biehn), a recluse living in the woods.  Two worlds collide in this psychological thriller that will make you question your trust in mankind. WHO IS THE VICTIM?

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